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Old 04-26-2013, 11:53 PM
Tbonez Tbonez is offline
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Default Slide technique questions

Im a heel/toe guy but I've been working on the slide lately. Do any of you guys that slide use a reverse slide technique (slide down the pedal)? I'm practicing sliding up the pedal but it seems so much more comfortable and faster to slide down. Am I going to lose leverage or speed with sliding down at some point?
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:22 AM
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EarthRocker EarthRocker is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

Sliding down the pedal doesn't seem logical to me. If sliding from the center area of the footboard gives you problems, twist your foot slightly as you do it. I can actually play quick double notes if I twitch my foot to the side and use the rotation momentum to catch the rebound with the right side of my foot rather than simply sliding.

The 'Slide' technique is really exhaderated (sp?) motion. With enough practice, it becomes a twitch. I've done it so long now, there is often no movement of my foot at all on the pedal board - it's just a second twitch of the muscles that gets the rebound note. The only time my foot actually 'Slides' anymore is when playing slower tempos.
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:36 AM
Tbonez Tbonez is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

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Originally Posted by EarthRocker View Post
Sliding down the pedal doesn't seem logical to me. If sliding from the center area of the footboard gives you problems, twist your foot slightly as you do it. I can actually play quick double notes if I twitch my foot to the side and use the rotation momentum to catch the rebound with the right side of my foot rather than simply sliding.

The 'Slide' technique is really exhaderated (sp?) motion. With enough practice, it becomes a twitch. I've done it so long now, there is often no movement of my foot at all on the pedal board - it's just a second twitch of the muscles that gets the rebound note. The only time my foot actually 'Slides' anymore is when playing slower tempos.
Very interesting information...When I have my slide up to speed,which is probably ridiculously slow for most of you, I noticed my foot wasn't actually sliding but imitating the twitch you refered to. I figured I was doing it wrong. Jeff Pracaro said it took him two years to get the slide where he could control it so I know I'm in for the long haul.

in regards to the reverse slide, my understanding is the slide is all about catching the rebound. I can just as easily and more comfortably catch the rebound going down the pedal as up...
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Old 04-27-2013, 02:24 AM
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EarthRocker EarthRocker is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

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Originally Posted by Tbonez View Post
Very interesting information...When I have my slide up to speed,which is probably ridiculously slow for most of you, I noticed my foot wasn't actually sliding but imitating the twitch you refered to. I figured I was doing it wrong. Jeff Pracaro said it took him two years to get the slide where he could control it so I know I'm in for the long haul.

in regards to the reverse slide, my understanding is the slide is all about catching the rebound. I can just as easily and more comfortably catch the rebound going down the pedal as up...
If you can catch the pedal sliding down, cheers. But for me, that's never been something that seemed appealing, or even applicable. But as far as the 'Slide' evolving to a twitch, no doubt you've heard of Bad Religion? I used to be on regular speaking terms with their drummer Brooks Wackerman, and I asked him about the slide technique once. His exact response was "I slide for slower tempos. For the faster stuff, no slide." and I always wondered what he meant.

Then sure enough, after practicing the technique for years, gradually my foot moved less and less. Now, when playing super fast doubles it doesn't move at all. I think the Sliding motion trains your muscles to a point that actually moving the foot is no longer neccesary.

I'm sure everyone has variations or different experiences.
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Old 04-27-2013, 02:55 PM
djmemjy djmemjy is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

I was using heel-toe for my doubles for a long time. I was never happy with the consistency. I finally found a teacher who used single pedal, played heel-up and slide technique.

He didn't tell me how to use the technique at all. Just gave me one exercise:

X ..........X........... X.......... X
R L K K R L K K R L K K R L K K

The X is a left foot hi-hat chink.

Play that pattern as 16th notes at about 60-65 bpm. When it is smooth as hell, go up 5-10 bpm and smooth the new tempo out. Keep going. Do it every time you sit at a kit. Makes for a good warm-up for feet and hands.

I promise you this will develop your kick doubles technique.

Once you get that mastered, start inverting the pattern and putting the kicks in different spots. I use 'slide' technique excuslively now for all my doubles, and they are a lot more consistent and even than before.

As mentioned above, the faster it gets the less your foot actually moves. It twitches, but you need to learn it at slower tempos to control the twitch.
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Old 04-27-2013, 03:43 PM
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TomPlaysDrums TomPlaysDrums is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

slide technique works different ways for different people, some slide up, some slide down and some slide sideways. slide whichever way feels the best/most comfortable for you.
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Old 04-27-2013, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

I use the technique, but never actually slide my foot, even when I learned it. I focus more on the leg/ankle aspect and adding moeller-esque strokes. Playing 16th note triplets helps with this. Find the motion (leg ankle ankle) it is rather twitchy, then once you can feel it try to slow it down. Eventually you get nice even strokes and leg/ankle are the same volume and then you just try different subdivisions. RLKK is also an amazing exercise to develop foot control but make sure there is a separate leg/ankle stroke and not two leg hits.

PS check your seat height peal settings and head tension as rebound is the key to this. I sit relatively high with my feet almost floating over my pedal, as low tension on my pedal without it getting floppy as possible, and no port (made a huge difference) in the reso head. Batter is tuned medium low.
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Old 04-28-2013, 02:01 AM
djmemjy djmemjy is offline
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Default Re: Slide technique questions

Yep I agree with what Andy said. As you build your speed up, you will automatically start to adjust to the leg / ankle movement imo. Leg leg just won't be able to cope with the workload. Although I believe starting exercises slow and building up the speed is the better approach rather than starting fast.

I play with my spring tension medium, the batter head tuned just above wrinkle, and a tight-ish ported reso head. It doesn't matter how you have your bass drum tuned, you just need to have it consistent when you practice. Then you will learn the amount of rebound you can expect to be able to use.
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