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  #1  
Old 10-12-2012, 04:17 PM
Royston Royston is offline
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Default moon gel

Sorry if this is in the wrong place or is a repeated item but could somebody explain to me exactly what the moon gel product does??? I have done a few searches and get the gist that it can be added and my dampen sounds etc but to what effect??.....

Complete beginner here so any experience would be appreciated.\
Cheers
roy
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  #2  
Old 10-12-2012, 04:33 PM
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Default Re: moon gel

The effect depends on how much moon gel you put on the drum. You could have one piece you cut to a size, or you could have a massive ring on the head.
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  #3  
Old 10-12-2012, 04:41 PM
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Default Re: moon gel

You may have noticed high-pitched ringing or overtones coming from your snare or toms when you hit them. Or maybe they just sustain for days and you want a little shorter, chuffier sound. In the olden days people would use duct tape or other expedient means of muffling. Now Moongel has become popular. It's essentially the same stuff as those sticky hand string things you get in the bubblegum machines at the drug store, but in little squares. You attach it to the drumhead, adding more for taste, to eliminate ring or overtones that you can't seem to tune out of the drumhead.

Some like it, some don't; other people use studio rings (also called "Richie rings) to control overtones. With advances in drumhead technology as well as consistency in bearing edges, most overtones can be tuned out without much in the way of muffling. But Moongel represents a sort of shortcut to controlling those qualities of a drum.
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Old 10-12-2012, 04:42 PM
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Default Re: moon gel

The purpose of Moon Gel is to muffle and cut down on over tones.

Google Moon Gel and you should find a web site.
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Old 10-12-2012, 04:43 PM
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Default Re: moon gel

I'm glad this got brought up. I use a little of it, but it gets old and the stuff is kind of pricey. I have seen some whitish looking stuff that seems to stay stuck on longer. Any idea what this is?
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  #6  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:26 PM
ggmerino ggmerino is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

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  #7  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:42 PM
Royston Royston is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Quote:
Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
You may have noticed high-pitched ringing or overtones coming from your snare or toms when you hit them. Or maybe they just sustain for days and you want a little shorter, chuffier sound. In the olden days people would use duct tape or other expedient means of muffling. Now Moongel has become popular. It's essentially the same stuff as those sticky hand string things you get in the bubblegum machines at the drug store, but in little squares. You attach it to the drumhead, adding more for taste, to eliminate ring or overtones that you can't seem to tune out of the drumhead.

Some like it, some don't; other people use studio rings (also called "Richie rings) to control overtones. With advances in drumhead technology as well as consistency in bearing edges, most overtones can be tuned out without much in the way of muffling. But Moongel represents a sort of shortcut to controlling those qualities of a drum.
Thanks for explaining so clearly, much appreciated......i'm guessing the later post referring to masking tape is an example of a more economic option? :)
Cheers
r
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  #8  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:47 PM
wesporter wesporter is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

I use some on my snare and toms. However duct tape basically does the same thing. It just looks a lil better then duct tape. If asthetics matter to you and think duct tape looks tacky then moongel is the way to go. I used to not use any muffling and do agree the a well tuned drum wide open is a good sound. However in my band I'm always playing mic'ed, and with close micing you tend to really be able to hear those overtones in the front of house speakers. Plus even when well tuned, by the last set of a 4 hour club gig they're gonna start going out of tune. So I muffle them slightly. Makes the drums sound better over all in the front mix and that's what's most important.
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  #9  
Old 10-12-2012, 06:37 PM
ggmerino ggmerino is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Only partly kidding with the picture of the masking tape :)

I think one awesome way to dampen drums is to use a small piece of medium-thick felt cloth attached at one end to the drum rim with a piece of maskinig tape so that the felt rests on top of the drum head but is not attached directly to the drum head. Then when you strike the drum the felt piece lifts off of the drumhead and you get a clear resonating drum sound and when the felt comes down again it dampens the overtones. You can buy big pieces of felt in a cloth store for pretty cheap and cut them to desired size (3" by 4" works well)- just make sure it is a bit thick. When something like mooongel or tape is put directly on the drumhead it not just kills the overtones and ringing, but also the initial drum tone, which I do not recommend (unless that is the sound you are looking for). This is an old trick used in recording studios.
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  #10  
Old 10-12-2012, 06:56 PM
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Default Re: moon gel

Basically, it's a kind of gel scraped from the butts of a relatively rare hairless chinchilla species. The idea is that you throw them against the wall so they stick, and they absorb the unwanted frequencies of the off key singing from the guitar players which in turn makes us drummers play better.

This is insider info, most people use them incorrectly, but I wanted to set things straight. Good luck!
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  #11  
Old 10-12-2012, 07:36 PM
boltzmann's brain boltzmann's brain is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

moongel in particular, and all damping media in general, were invented/designed to ruin the sound of drums. :)
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  #12  
Old 10-13-2012, 06:00 AM
Bonzobilly Bonzobilly is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

I'm with Boltzmann on this one. Other than the bass drum, which needs a bit of treatment, I want to hear all of what I paid for.
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  #13  
Old 10-13-2012, 06:17 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Quote:
Originally Posted by boltzmann's brain View Post
moongel in particular, and all damping media in general, were invented/designed to ruin the sound of drums. :)
I've known a few close mics that may argue that point though. :-)
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  #14  
Old 10-13-2012, 08:09 AM
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Aeolian Aeolian is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Moongel is basically little squares of Blu-Tak which audiophiles have been using for years to damp things they set on shelves. It does get dirty over time, and while you can wash it, it doesn't stick the same as when new. Which actually can be handy as it doesn't damp the head as much.

Like most damping materials, it is a soft rubbery compound that has a very low modulus and natural frequency. When confronted with higher frequency vibrations it can't react as fast and the vibrations get internally dissipated as heat. There isn't enough energy to notice any appreciable temperature rise, but that's what happens. Because of this, it damps higher frequency vibrations in things it is attached to. The higher the frequency, the greater the damping. Which is why it is great on drumheads for killing overtones. As a piece of mass with a resonant frequency lower than that of the tuning of the drumhead, it also absorbs some of the fundamental, thus shortening the sustain.
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  #15  
Old 10-13-2012, 03:35 PM
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mrmike mrmike is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Does anyone think moongel sounds different than duct tape? For some reason I prefer tape lately on snare but I am a bit of a wacko and can never stick to one snare sound.

I also prefer the Remo active drum dampening system. http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&s...9,r:2,s:0,i:78
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Last edited by mrmike; 10-13-2012 at 03:59 PM.
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  #16  
Old 10-13-2012, 05:09 PM
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BigDinSD BigDinSD is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Gaffers tape works nice. Won't leave Duct tape residue and you can travel with it on your snares without them falling off in the drum case.

Picked up a white 1" wide roll pretty inexpensive.
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  #17  
Old 10-15-2012, 05:07 PM
afd100 afd100 is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

I never like to muffle my snare at all, because to me it just sounds dull when I do that; I don't get all the beautiful tones from it, and there's no crack. For my toms though, I really like the Evans E rings, I tried moongel but never really liked it. Anyone else use E rings?
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  #18  
Old 10-15-2012, 05:14 PM
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topgun2021 topgun2021 is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Quote:
Originally Posted by afd100 View Post
I never like to muffle my snare at all, because to me it just sounds dull when I do that; I don't get all the beautiful tones from it, and there's no crack. For my toms though, I really like the Evans E rings, I tried moongel but never really liked it. Anyone else use E rings?
I used E 0rings once. My sticks kept going underneath them so they would get picked up and twirl around mt sticks as I played.
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  #19  
Old 10-16-2012, 12:25 AM
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Default Re: moon gel

If I have to slightly control the artifacts of the snare drum for one reason or another, I'll use a piece of Moongel. Rings just flop around too much and sometimes are picked-up by the microphones and in a lot of cases get speared by the sticks. In a practice situation, just about anything will work. Tuning and the correct head combination is always the best way to go.

Dennis
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  #20  
Old 10-16-2012, 12:30 AM
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Deathmetalconga Deathmetalconga is offline
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Default Re: moon gel

Quote:
Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
You may have noticed high-pitched ringing or overtones coming from your snare or toms when you hit them. Or maybe they just sustain for days and you want a little shorter, chuffier sound. In the olden days people would use duct tape or other expedient means of muffling. Now Moongel has become popular. It's essentially the same stuff as those sticky hand string things you get in the bubblegum machines at the drug store, but in little squares. You attach it to the drumhead, adding more for taste, to eliminate ring or overtones that you can't seem to tune out of the drumhead.

Some like it, some don't; other people use studio rings (also called "Richie rings) to control overtones. With advances in drumhead technology as well as consistency in bearing edges, most overtones can be tuned out without much in the way of muffling. But Moongel represents a sort of shortcut to controlling those qualities of a drum.
A good summary, but moongel also works for cymbals to reduce overtones and wash.

I don't use Moongel, but I do use that blue, white or yellow office putty. You can shape it and make it any size needed and it doesn't get dusty like Moongel.
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