DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 10-24-2010, 04:09 AM
Lucho's Avatar
Lucho Lucho is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 46
Default Tips for Recording

Hello everyone,

I'm looking for any tips you can give me for recording drums. And I don't mean from an engineering perspective, I mean specifically as a player.

So keeping it simple, playing to the song, that sort of stuff. I've heard all those things before, I'm looking for any great insights anyone might have that can help get me through a studio setting and feel great about my takes afterwards.

Right now I'm recording with a Latin/funk band and I'm just finding that when I come out of the studio, I'm never 100% happy with my takes. The producer is telling me that they sound great, and I should be happy with them, but when I listen to them back it's just something about them, I hear the little bits where I went off or made a slight mistake and it just makes me cringe every time.

Is this something that is normal? Or what can I do to work on this sort of stuff?

Thanks in advance for any advice :)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-24-2010, 04:24 AM
bermuda's Avatar
bermuda bermuda is offline
Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 9,103
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Players will typically hear slight imperfections in their parts, that not even someone who plays the same instrument would catch. You have to learn to live with a certain amount of it, and resist the urge to spend studio time ($$) trying to correct things if the artist or producer are happy. You'd be alarmed at how many classic drum parts are actually pretty loose if you were to solo them.

That's not to say you should rationalize obvious mistakes, but you have to draw the line between what's really necessary to fix, and being overly-meticulous when your drumming already sounds good in the track where it matters.

Basically, if the people who hired you are happy with your work, you should be, too.

Bermuda
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-24-2010, 11:17 AM
jayblazeff's Avatar
jayblazeff jayblazeff is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Akron Ohio
Posts: 223
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Bermuda hit the nail right on the head,which makes sense, since he's a pro drummer! :)

We're our own worse critics. If the artists and/or producer is happy with it, then go with it. There is NO such thing as a perfect drum track, at least I've never played one lol! If it weren't for little imperfections, it would sound like a sequencer, and you wouldn't want that would ya?
__________________
Taye tour pro drums, 8" 10" 12" 14" toms, 5x14" snare, 20" kick. Evans heads, Zildjian cymbals.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-24-2010, 09:49 PM
TNA TNA is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 302
Default Re: Tips for Recording

I agree with the other guys, nobody is ever 100 percent happy with what they record. Even if they are happy with it right after, you'll listen to it a week later and think you could have played much better. The only thing I can recommend would be to know the song in your sleep, and have all your fills down exactly the way you want them. Don't try to improvise a fill or anything on the spot. Other than that just make sure the sound your drums is something you're happy with.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-24-2010, 10:15 PM
Ethan01's Avatar
Ethan01 Ethan01 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 359
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Couple fast tips... Make sure your drums are tuned how you like it. When the mics are setup and you do a sound check, ask to just hear the room/overheads with no EQ/Comp/effects to hear your natural mix (are you cymbal heavy, kick light, snare heavy, or balanced, or...?) and try to naturally mix your kit to the song trying to take into account only the room/overheads. All those close mics will bring out natural tones of your drums but you don't want to rely on them to fix a bad mix, since the sounds bleed a lot into other mics. Really be conscious of your mix.

Bring spare snares/drums/cymbals and try to get the sound in your head onto tape by using difference drums. Always try to adjust a sound by hand before you go into Pro Tools. For instance if you have a real ringy snare, try to tape it down a little. Same goes for cymbals. If you want a boomy kick, open the door to the studio and put a room mic a bit further away. The more time you spend getting the sounds you want, the happier you'll be. On the same token, make SURE you're prepared to play your part.

A rule of thumb for me was to do 3 takes of a song and listen to the best take afterwards to be sure we had it before we moved on. If you aren't prepared and need more takes then that, then you'll have less time getting the sounds you want. The better the drums sound with no effects/processing, the better the foundation, then the more headroom the engineer has later when mixing the whole band.
__________________
My kit pics
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-24-2010, 10:25 PM
alex19's Avatar
alex19 alex19 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Middlesbrough, UK
Posts: 143
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNA View Post
I agree with the other guys, nobody is ever 100 percent happy with what they record. Even if they are happy with it right after, you'll listen to it a week later and think you could have played much better. The only thing I can recommend would be to know the song in your sleep, and have all your fills down exactly the way you want them. Don't try to improvise a fill or anything on the spot. Other than that just make sure the sound your drums is something you're happy with.

i cant agree with this more. when we recorded, i did 3 songs and i did every song on this first take. this is because we practiced these songs like mad, and i had my fills laid out and didnt improvise.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-24-2010, 10:30 PM
BillBachman's Avatar
BillBachman BillBachman is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 1,315
Default Re: Tips for Recording

It's normal to pretty much never be happy with your own recordings, that's the ambitious perfectionist in us all (or most of us).

I've found that the most important thing is to be mentally in a easy going-carefree state. If you're super concerned with every detail you'll end up hyper-listening to yourself and drum like you're walking on egg shells. If you're just having fun then it'll come across that way and sound as good as you've practiced.
__________________
Modern Drummer Ed. team
DrumWorkout.com
Skype hand tech lessons:
billbachman.net
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-25-2010, 05:27 AM
Lucho's Avatar
Lucho Lucho is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 46
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Thanks for the tips everyone!

Gives me lots of things to keep in mind! I appreciate the advice.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-26-2010, 01:04 AM
Davo-London's Avatar
Davo-London Davo-London is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: St Albans, I work in London
Posts: 1,439
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Solid metre. That's the only thing worth criticising. If it isn't on the head then work on that.

Davo
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-26-2010, 01:26 AM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 9,971
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Post-recording cringe. It must be universal.

The hard part is judgement. There are times when everyone is happy with the takes but you know the track would benefit if there was a slight change. For example, our band did a demo earlier this year. There was a slight sense that something was wrong but no one could put their finger on it.

Then our singer realised that he'd sat well on top of the beat in his entire track (no doubt due to being psyched up). So he asked the engineer to pull his entire vocal dub back just a tad in Pro Tools and, when that was done, the whole thing sat better. It certainly made my drum part sound better because, until that was done it sounded like I was lagging :)

In the end it comes down to cost/benefit - how much trouble is it to change the part and how much benefit will come from the change.
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-26-2010, 02:23 AM
Lucho's Avatar
Lucho Lucho is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 46
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
Post-recording cringe. It must be universal.

The hard part is judgement. There are times when everyone is happy with the takes but you know the track would benefit if there was a slight change. For example, our band did a demo earlier this year. There was a slight sense that something was wrong but no one could put their finger on it.

Then our singer realised that he'd sat well on top of the beat in his entire track (no doubt due to being psyched up). So he asked the engineer to pull his entire vocal dub back just a tad in Pro Tools and, when that was done, the whole thing sat better. It certainly made my drum part sound better because, until that was done it sounded like I was lagging :)

In the end it comes down to cost/benefit - how much trouble is it to change the part and how much benefit will come from the change.

Yea, This I think hits it dead on. I spoke to our engineer and told him that I wanted to redo the part if it's not too much trouble, and he said that we should just leave it the way it is because once everything else is added on, it will sound fine.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-27-2010, 07:31 PM
AJNystrom AJNystrom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Taunton, Massachusetts, USA
Posts: 84
Default Re: Tips for Recording

I'm always hyper-critical of my playing in the studio. Like someone else mentioned, we're our own worst critic. Like the saying goes, don't sweat the small stuff.

I was recording with a guy that thought I was simply amazing just by rocking a 4/4 groove and throwing in a few fills. I walked back into the control room with him raving about how awesome it sounded. I just looked at the producer and was like um.. punch me in on the second verse, I was off by a full beat... he just nodded and said "yup, imagine how happy hes going to be when you play it correctly!

It's all in the eyes of the beholder. If the producer/engineer is happy with it and the artist is happy with it then you, too, should be happy with it as long as it's not overtly off-beat or totally "off" in any other sense... like totally eating a fill or something.

AJ
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-28-2010, 03:11 PM
Coreybox Coreybox is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Mesquite, TX
Posts: 16
Default Re: Tips for Recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex19 View Post
i cant agree with this more. when we recorded, i did 3 songs and i did every song on this first take. this is because we practiced these songs like mad, and i had my fills laid out and didnt improvise.
Knowing what to play is big.

OTOH.. improvising can come up with some cool stuff. You don't want to waste the other members time/money in a studio setting though.

Do you own any recording equipment? What works great for me is "pre-recording" before spending money in a real studio (or for an engineer/producer). Record the guitar and bass to a click, and then I can play along, improv, record some ideas.. just get my parts down. If you get a ceratin groove or fill you really like, then transcribe and practice it so you have it down for the real recording session.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com