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  #41  
Old 05-31-2009, 11:51 PM
VedranS VedranS is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Then you have drummers like Stewart Copeland...who know that chops mean nothing as long as you've got the feel of a musical jazz drummer (who wears gay gloves).
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  #42  
Old 06-01-2009, 12:38 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Two guys are listening to a band. One guy says, "I really like that drummer's feel." The other guy says, "Are you kidding? I don't think he has any feel at all."
Feel is something that's percieved. No matter how hard you try you're just not going to look or sound to others exactly the way you see or hear yourself. So your best bet is to get your technique down, play musically and let others decide how good your feel is.
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  #43  
Old 06-01-2009, 02:34 AM
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Two guys are listening to a band. One guy says, "I really like that drummer's feel." The other guy says, "Are you kidding? I don't think he has any feel at all."
Feel is something that's percieved. No matter how hard you try you're just not going to look or sound to others exactly the way you see or hear yourself. So your best bet is to get your technique down, play musically and let others decide how good your feel is.
I think that's an excellent point.

Imagine being in a music venue. The crowd is hanging out having fun. Then this song comes along and everyone gets on thier feet and they start dancing.

Is that because the drummer is playing doulbe inverted flamadiddles or because the song just has a great groove? Or one could say, a great feel. The word feel and groove overlap in a musical sense.
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  #44  
Old 06-01-2009, 05:13 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Steve Gadd has good "feel" because he is a technical master. A
In that case, wouldn't a guy like Thomas Lang have the best "feel" in the world?
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  #45  
Old 06-01-2009, 05:22 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Is that because the drummer is playing doulbe inverted flamadiddles or because the song just has a great groove? Or one could say, a great feel. The word feel and groove overlap in a musical sense.

Great point. Not to restate what you just said but the essential bit is getting a nice accessible groove. Play to suit the song, not vice versa.
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  #46  
Old 06-01-2009, 05:25 AM
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Definitely both. When I first learn a song I concentrate on just getting the feel of it, getting a pleasant back-beat. Once I have a good feel, then I focus on the specifics and the technique. I like to learn songs with every note perfectly in sync, but I'd rather play simple and with soul then perfect like a robot.
A down-to-earth comment, robotic drummers are dry and emotion-less.
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  #47  
Old 06-01-2009, 01:12 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Being solid and having great time is a feel thing.
Heh, then a drum machine would have awesome feel :) Or maybe by "great" time you don't mean perfect time but timing that just sounds good, with the little pushes and pulls in the right places?

I think that what separates "feel" drummers from others is their subtle use of dynamics ... those little accents that are felt more than noticed in themselves. To me it's subtelty of touch, like Steve Gadd's and Harvey Mason's tasty nuances, Stewie Copeland's hat work, Bernard Purdie's shuffle ...

Going for too much "feel" doesn't work for me because it affects my timing. I was known as a "feel drummer" when I was young but when I listen back to old recordings my most solid tracks were the ones where I was less precious about it.

Larryace recently made a comment about how he finds he plays better if he uses his head more than his heart and I think that's what he was on about. Sometimes that attempt to get nuances exactly right can screw up the big picture performance ... not seeing the forest for the trees bla bla ...
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  #48  
Old 06-01-2009, 04:47 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Everyone has feel (good, bad or in the middle) and everyone has technique (again, good, bad or in the middle). It's all a matter of degree.

Good feel with bad technique is still good feel, who cares about the technique. Good technique with bad feel, is still bad feel, so I think of the two, I'd rather have good feel, if I had just one to choose.

Since I don't have to choose, I work on technique, and hopefully my feel improves in direct proportion to my musical maturity.

Which raises the question, can one really "work" on feel? Is it directly tied to our personality?
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  #49  
Old 06-01-2009, 06:43 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Everyone has feel (good, bad or in the middle) and everyone has technique (again, good, bad or in the middle). It's all a matter of degree.

Good feel with bad technique is still good feel, who cares about the technique. Good technique with bad feel, is still bad feel, so I think of the two, I'd rather have good feel, if I had just one to choose.

Since I don't have to choose, I work on technique, and hopefully my feel improves in direct proportion to my musical maturity.

Which raises the question, can one really "work" on feel? Is it directly tied to our personality?
I think so. Some people are more expressive, listen better to others, don't let ego or negative emotions get in the way, etc. The more you listen to others and play with others, the better you will be able to develop your feel, assuming that is something you want to do. There are some drummers who don't play with much expressive feel but they are in genres where that isn't valued or wanted so much. As with everything, it all boils down to the context of the music and what you need to play for it at that time.
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  #50  
Old 06-01-2009, 06:57 PM
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I think so. Some people are more expressive, listen better to others, don't let ego or negative emotions get in the way, etc. The more you listen to others and play with others, the better you will be able to develop your feel, assuming that is something you want to do. There are some drummers who don't play with much expressive feel but they are in genres where that isn't valued or wanted so much. As with everything, it all boils down to the context of the music and what you need to play for it at that time.
You both made very good points. I would disagree w/ Larry a bit though...you can't take your heart out of the playing and let your head control and dictate what you play. Like anything I think you need balance. The chatter in your head can impede your playing more than it can help.

When playing "in the moment", I think you have to let go and trust that all of your practice will come through, while you play with your heart. That's where the "feel" is.

The constant inner-chatter where you're asking yourself, "Am I playing the right thing? Am I overplaying? How are my dynamics? Is my time tight enough...I sure hope my pocket sounds deep..." - is self-destructive and stressful.
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  #51  
Old 06-01-2009, 07:10 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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The constant inner-chatter where you're asking yourself, "Am I playing the right thing? Am I overplaying? How are my dynamics? Is my time tight enough...I sure hope my pocket sounds deep..." - is self-destructive and stressful.
Yea, that's the inner critic that someone dubbed here, and he needs to shut up when

you're playing. It's weird, I try to get into a place where my mind isn't thinking consciously

when I'm playing, I try and just let the music pass through me rather than think about

what I'm doing. I'm there sometimes, and when I am, I'm firing on all 8. For some

reason staring straight ahead and focusing on something at least 10 feet away and above

my head helps me to get there, as if my ears are where I'm focusing, listening to what the

audience hears, gaining the larger perspective.
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  #52  
Old 06-01-2009, 07:10 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Very good input. Drummers such as Ian Paice, John Bonham, Bill Ward and Carmine Appice, do they have feel and technique?


From the get go, GTBT, Bonham was playing those sixteenth note triplets on the bass drum. That requires technique and quite a bit of it. And he always had good hands. His placement of notes as well. You have to be able to tell the foot and hands exactly where you want them to place the note, and that is a technical question. Once you develop that technique, it becomes part of your feel.

I listened to Presence the other day because Achilles Last Stand was being discussed on the board. I noticed that Bonham's playing was quite different than on the earlier albums. His drumming evolved. it did become a little more refined. At that point, they were just a studio band so that had to have a profound affect on his drumming.

The over drawn rigors of having to play with a click is a different question. That is a technical ability that one can develop. I think that once you develop the discipline of being able to play with a click, it will help your groove. I got that from Purdie. Again, another great groover with great technique.

I would say that feel is like technique in the sense of once you have it, what are you going to do with it. One of my favorite bands was Stuff, and now that their stuff is out on CD, I have repurchased the recordings, One of the great feel bands like Booker T and the MGs. But to tell you the truth, as much as I love it, I tire of it because at points it just doesn't go anywhere. Why can't you have both?

When we talk about technique it is also necessary to know what technique is and what it does. I have heard musicians many times say things like "I love Jaco because he is not a technical player." Jaco had wonderful technique: wonderful tone and wonderful nuance and great expression. That is all anyone can hope that technique will give them..

I also wanted to add that the question becomes so much more interesting when it is phrased as "feel and technique" and one is not pitted against the other.
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  #53  
Old 06-01-2009, 07:10 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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When playing "in the moment", I think you have to let go and trust that all of your practice will come through, while you play with your heart. That's where the "feel" is.
Bingo! This gent here wins the toaster oven, folks!
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  #54  
Old 06-01-2009, 07:38 PM
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unless we break it down to the technical workings of one's brain chemistry.
more accurately neuropsychologically, there are chemical and structural components and they interrelate and can change in all kinds of ways (even your immune system is part of the show!)
It's one that's easy to discount as "beyond the scope of the conversation" and that may very well be why these convos come up (and it ain't just drummers) and with the tone they do and.
in a way, it could discount a real good platform for looking at the musical experience (as a perceptual/cognitive event...there are people with amusia for instance) and can take us from "This or That" discrete system view to a more highly interrelated type view.


The neuropsych of it can offer some very neat perspectives (Diana Deutsch UCSD does some very cool work on neuropsych of music - eh neither here nor there, but she does some neat and accissible stuff for those who are interested).

Married to a PhD in behavioral neuropsych myself (she was studying while we were dating so it was fun to see the process), it really opened my mind and my world's a lot freakier for it!
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  #55  
Old 06-01-2009, 08:14 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

[quote=justjim;581558]more accurately neuropsychologically, there are chemical and structural components and they interrelate and can change in all kinds of ways (even your immune system is part of the show!)
It's one that's easy to discount as "beyond the scope of the conversation" and that may very well be why these convos come up (and it ain't just drummers) and with the tone they do and.
in a way, it could discount a real good platform for looking at the musical experience (as a perceptual/cognitive event...there are people with amusia for instance) and can take us from "This or That" discrete system view to a more highly interrelated type view.

QUOTE]

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  #56  
Old 06-01-2009, 08:18 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

[quote=larryace;581580]
Quote:
Originally Posted by justjim View Post
more accurately neuropsychologically, there are chemical and structural components and they interrelate and can change in all kinds of ways (even your immune system is part of the show!)
It's one that's easy to discount as "beyond the scope of the conversation" and that may very well be why these convos come up (and it ain't just drummers) and with the tone they do and.
in a way, it could discount a real good platform for looking at the musical experience (as a perceptual/cognitive event...there are people with amusia for instance) and can take us from "This or That" discrete system view to a more highly interrelated type view.

QUOTE]

Huh? 2020202020202020
I'm gonna go ahead and second that "what?"
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  #57  
Old 06-01-2009, 08:22 PM
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no prob

what part's hanging ya up?
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  #58  
Old 06-01-2009, 08:23 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Thanks Jonesy. I'm not alone ha ha. Don't want to appear stupid, but I totally don't get the point as it relates to the thread
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  #59  
Old 06-01-2009, 08:35 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Now I know what amusia is. I'll use it in a sentence. Amusia to make a point.

It is often the case that when something breaks down, in this case the ability to express music, we can come to a greater understanding of what it actually is we are dealing with. When a person has a specific brain injury we can learn which part of the brain actually is processing certain activities. Such may also be the case with music. We are fascinated by question like how do the deaf experience music? for example.

I think we as musicians are romantic in spirit. We believe that music is post-sensory; that it is not just a sensory or even cognitive experience. No matter how much you quantify the experience you can't take away the basic magic behind, "yeah, but how does it happen?"

It is no coincidence I bet that this research was pioneered at UCSC, which is a school that is doing a lot of research in finding the interdependence these kind of polar opposites. It's a very phenomenological thing. I remember when I first went to school you would do a paper like nature v. nurture. You had to take a side and argue it. But the whole time I was thinking it's kinda both. it is always kind of both isn't it? and it's kind of neither sometimes as well. :)

This whole post was pointless.
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  #60  
Old 06-01-2009, 09:03 PM
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Thanks Jonesy. I'm not alone ha ha. Don't want to appear stupid,
oh dude, don't feel that way - it's just another way of checking it out

but I totally don't get the point as it relates to the thread

Probably a good starting point is to notice that it's a response to a particular part about "unless we look at it in terms of brain chemistry"

and that part was just used as a qualifier (as in "yeah, I suppose we could look at it that way...but we won't"), but I think that part (the chemistry/neuropsych) has a lot lot lot to offer in terms of perspective on it
It can give us a different take on how we might think about
"This is learned, but that is innate"
"Oh I'm right brained and he's left brained"
"This is the heart, that is the head"
hell even
"This is the nervous system - that's the immune system"

and a lot of times it begs more questions like "In what sense?" or can bring up the deal "It's not an exclusive OR nor even a discrete OR it can be a continuum, interactive processes, an integrated whole" (just as examples)


I first went to school you would do a paper like nature v. nurture. You had to take a side and argue it. But the whole time I was thinking it's kinda both. it is always kind of both isn't it?


Hell, there isn't even always a brightline between the concepts
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  #61  
Old 06-01-2009, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Here's a video with Jeff Pocaro discussing lope and feel. Starts around the four minute mark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7p-a...eature=related
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  #62  
Old 06-01-2009, 11:15 PM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Here's a video with Jeff Pocaro discussing lope and feel. Starts around the four minute mark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7p-a...eature=related
Jeff Porcaro is unquestionably one of the great technique masters. He is a perfect example of someone who had monster technique and used it to help develop his "feel." Do you think it doesn't take monster technique to be able to play a "lope" on the hi hat? Or those crazy 16th notes with a lope? Check out part 2 of that video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdaxu5rUjcQ
His early demise was at least as much of a loss as Jim Gordon's exit from the music world.

As far as "getting lost in the music" goes, I know a performance is good when I get there. But there is a huge difference between someone with technical competence getting "lost in the music" and a 5th grade snare student. This simply must be restated - "feel" is a nebulous, mushy concept. It can't be argued about or discussed in a meaningful, rational manner. "Feel" has become a currency for people to use as credit without putting in the work.

How about we invent a new concept called "moonbeam". No one really knows what "moonbeam" is or how to achieve it, but if you have "moonbeam" it means you are secretly a better drummer. Every novice in the world can now say 'Steve Gadd is a pretty good drummer, but I don't like his Moonbeam. I think I have better Moonbeam than Gadd and my grandmother says so too!'

Last edited by Average; 06-01-2009 at 11:23 PM. Reason: Wierd, I've seen that video
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  #63  
Old 06-02-2009, 12:18 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Gosh,
I had that video of Porcaro when I was a little kid. It was on VHS and the tape was long ago eaten. I muse have watched it 300 times. I forgot how much of an influence he was on my playing.

Talk about what technical mastery can do for "feel". Porcaro is one of the best examples, in my opinion. He is absolutely solid. Every note is perfect. His "feel" is - to use the modern term - 'bombass.' It would be impossible to achieve Porcaro's "feel" without many years of practice. How many people do you know that sound that solid when playing a groove with no other instruments playing? There are maybe 100 guys alive today that have a right hand capable of playing 16th notes that fast with that much control, probably fewer. What do all these Copeland fans have to say about Porcaro's hi-hat work?

I urge you to watch that series of videos if you haven't already. Also, what do Gadd, Gordon, Porcaro, and other masters have in common? Steely Dan! Talk about an awesome band that gets very little credit.

Last edited by Average; 06-02-2009 at 12:21 AM. Reason: One more point.
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  #64  
Old 06-02-2009, 02:42 AM
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Gosh,

I urge you to watch that series of videos if you haven't already. Also, what do Gadd, Gordon, Porcaro, and other masters have in common? Steely Dan! Talk about an awesome band that gets very little credit.
And don't forget Bernard Purdie. Steely Dan made musicians music. some of the best stuff ever put out on LP.
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  #65  
Old 06-02-2009, 03:04 AM
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- "feel" is a nebulous, mushy concept. It can't be argued about or discussed in a meaningful, rational manner.
I guess we will agree to disagree. When Jeff talked about the groove he played on FM he first played 16ths and didn't like the feel. It was too stiff.

When he choose to use 8th notes it changed the feel. He was trying to duplicate the snakey feel the band had when they played the tune. His words, not mine.

Clearly technique is important. Take the Pocaro track "Dirty Laundry" Four on the floor, two and four on the snare, and an eight note hat ride..Not exactly the upper end of technique, but the feel of that tune is what made it, and not the chops.

Take care.
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  #66  
Old 06-02-2009, 04:37 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

I don't think there is anything "nebulous" about feel at all. Any drummer can sit down and learn a pattern...it's just a series of physical movements. The subtleties that make it sound good and make you feel good when listening to it is exactly what makes it music - the feel.
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  #67  
Old 06-02-2009, 05:25 AM
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From the get go, GTBT, Bonham was playing those sixteenth note triplets on the bass drum. That requires technique and quite a bit of it. And he always had good hands. His placement of notes as well. You have to be able to tell the foot and hands exactly where you want them to place the note, and that is a technical question. Once you develop that technique, it becomes part of your feel.

I listened to Presence the other day because Achilles Last Stand was being discussed on the board. I noticed that Bonham's playing was quite different than on the earlier albums. His drumming evolved. it did become a little more refined. At that point, they were just a studio band so that had to have a profound affect on his drumming.

The over drawn rigors of having to play with a click is a different question. That is a technical ability that one can develop. I think that once you develop the discipline of being able to play with a click, it will help your groove. I got that from Purdie. Again, another great groover with great technique.

I would say that feel is like technique in the sense of once you have it, what are you going to do with it. One of my favorite bands was Stuff, and now that their stuff is out on CD, I have repurchased the recordings, One of the great feel bands like Booker T and the MGs. But to tell you the truth, as much as I love it, I tire of it because at points it just doesn't go anywhere. Why can't you have both?

When we talk about technique it is also necessary to know what technique is and what it does. I have heard musicians many times say things like "I love Jaco because he is not a technical player." Jaco had wonderful technique: wonderful tone and wonderful nuance and great expression. That is all anyone can hope that technique will give them..

I also wanted to add that the question becomes so much more interesting when it is phrased as "feel and technique" and one is not pitted against the other.
Deltadrummer,

I really enjoyed and captured the essence of your message, very constructive.

Thanks,
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  #68  
Old 06-02-2009, 05:40 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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From the get go, GTBT, Bonham was playing those sixteenth note triplets on the bass drum. That requires technique and quite a bit of it. And he always had good hands. His placement of notes as well. You have to be able to tell the foot and hands exactly where you want them to place the note, and that is a technical question. Once you develop that technique, it becomes part of your feel.
I tend to think that note placement is all about feel and not about technique. Playing on top, ahead, or behind, is feel not technique.

Moreover, Bonham is revered for his feel and not his chops by most players.That's not to say he didn't have great technique. Clearly he did, but it was his feel that set him apart.

Maybe it's just semantics, I dunno.
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  #69  
Old 06-02-2009, 05:50 AM
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I tend to think that note placement is all about feel and not about technique. Playing on top, ahead, or behind, is feel not technique..
The point DD made, was that the ability to place a note or multiple notes in the exact 64th or 32nd or16th space that you want in a bar needs good control, practice & technique too.
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  #70  
Old 06-02-2009, 07:15 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Back to the feel thing....I was listening to some Motown songs today, and I thought it would be cool if someone was able to take those songs and using some software, somehow make them so they line up with a click, and compare the original to the altered version, just for kicks. I would like to hear that.
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Old 06-02-2009, 12:20 PM
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Ian Williams Ian Williams is offline
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Default Re: Feel and Technique, importance?

Feel / Groove and Technique / Chops, remain great areas to develop and grow.
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  #72  
Old 06-02-2009, 01:18 PM
aydee aydee is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

I think Vinnie Colauita has great Flops.

He puts great Feel in his Chops.
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  #73  
Old 06-02-2009, 05:17 PM
rootheart rootheart is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

you can have "feel" without any technique..no doubt about this..lots of great drummers did so..
You also can have technique without feel, no doubt about this..lots of drummers do so posting something on Youtube...
Feel counts, technique is just a lousy tool....
----a drummer cannot groove if the band does not groove----
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  #74  
Old 06-02-2009, 07:23 PM
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mattsmith mattsmith is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rootheart View Post
you can have "feel" without any technique..no doubt about this..lots of great drummers did so..
You also can have technique without feel, no doubt about this..lots of drummers do so posting something on Youtube...
Feel counts, technique is just a lousy tool....
----a drummer cannot groove if the band does not groove----
You can count the great drummers who were technique challenged on one hand.

No doubt about that.

Great drummers groove poor bands all the time. But a poor drummer will ruin the best of bands.
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Old 06-02-2009, 08:57 PM
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  #75  
Old 06-02-2009, 09:46 PM
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druid druid is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Average View Post
This argument is about having status without doing the work. Period.
Bingo.......Nail meet Hammer.......
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Old 06-02-2009, 11:07 PM
Average Average is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

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Originally Posted by Steady Freddy View Post
I tend to think that note placement is all about feel and not about technique. Playing on top, ahead, or behind, is feel not technique.
I have to disagree on this point. Being able to intentionally and consciously play ahead, behind or on top of the beat is a technical issue. It requires a lot of practice and a lot of live playing to be able to consciously switch that particular aspect of your playing from song to song or even within a song.

I will give you that certain drummers will accidently play ahead or behind the beat and that can make their sound unique, but intentionally doing it is another matter entirely. That ability is one of the things that separates novices from the pros. It is one of the reasons that studio guys get their gigs. The producer will say 'I need you to play a little behind the beat here,' and the studio drummer can do it on command.
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  #77  
Old 06-03-2009, 04:16 AM
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

That's the point exactly. I did some minor studio work many years ago, and I found the limitations of my technique quite a struggle. When you listen back it is not what you thought it would be because the mic picks up everything, the nuance or lack there of. Never mind the ability to do what you want to do. It's frustrating to be able to hear it but not be able to execute with the same ease and musicality that is going on in your head. Although I had studied a lot and had what I considered good technique, I didn't have the technical training necessary to really excel in the studio. It was a bad experience for me as a young drummer. Had I been more prepared, my story may have been a lot more positive.

Technique allows you to relax and that is a big part of it. I remember when I first played Home at Last with a band. There was those triplet figures on the bass drum. There was a certain place where I wanted those bass drum notes to land, and it was not easy getting that feel, getting them to land where I wanted them to land. It is splitting hairs because it is either in the pocket of it's not and the difference is minuscule. But when I got it to fit in, the pocket was so much deeper; it took it to a new level of expression.

You can talk about Rosanna as well, and the great feel; but the technique that it takes to drive the feel out of the groove is staggering, and Jeff Porcaro was one dude who certainly had it.
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  #78  
Old 06-03-2009, 05:06 AM
aydee aydee is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
That's the point exactly. I did some minor studio work many years ago, and I found the limitations of my technique quite a struggle. When you listen back it is not what you thought it would be because the mic picks up everything, the nuance or lack there of. Never mind the ability to do what you want to do. It's frustrating to be able to hear it but not be able to execute with the same ease and musicality that is going on in your head. Although I had studied a lot and had what I considered good technique, I didn't have the technical training necessary to really excel in the studio. It was a bad experience for me as a young drummer. Had I been more prepared, my story may have been a lot more positive.

Technique allows you to relax and that is a big part of it. I remember when I first played Home at Last with a band. There was those triplet figures on the bass drum. There was a certain place where I wanted those bass drum notes to land, and it was not easy getting that feel, getting them to land where I wanted them to land. It is splitting hairs because it is either in the pocket of it's not and the difference is minuscule. But when I got it to fit in, the pocket was so much deeper; it took it to a new level of expression.

You can talk about Rosanna as well, and the great feel; but the technique that it takes to drive the feel out of the groove is staggering, and Jeff Porcaro was one dude who certainly had it.
great post. the ultimate argument against technique non believers.
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  #79  
Old 06-03-2009, 05:28 AM
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Default Re: Feel and Technique, importance?

Feel + Technique = Expression, Soul.
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Old 06-03-2009, 05:35 AM
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con struct con struct is offline
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Default Re: Feel or Technique, importance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
That's the point exactly. I did some minor studio work many years ago, and I found the limitations of my technique quite a struggle. When you listen back it is not what you thought it would be because the mic picks up everything, the nuance or lack there of. Never mind the ability to do what you want to do. It's frustrating to be able to hear it but not be able to execute with the same ease and musicality that is going on in your head. Although I had studied a lot and had what I considered good technique, I didn't have the technical training necessary to really excel in the studio. It was a bad experience for me as a young drummer. Had I been more prepared, my story may have been a lot more positive.
Yes, exactly. I remember one session I did, I think it was a bank commercial, and there was a kid there that nobody knew who was hired to play the pedal steel guitar. It was a country-ish sort of thing. The rest of us had it down in no time, but this kid couldn't get it. So he was brought into the control room, to dub his part in later.
The point is that the music was easy, I mean easy, a little two-beat country thing, no big deal, right? Forget about it. Simple as it may have been there was a lot of technique being brought to bear on that music, and that's why we always got called back.
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