DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:03 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Hi guys, I've been interested in drumming for a while and I've finally started to take it seriously. I got pretty good at rock band drums (yeah....) a few years back, and now I'm starting to build a foundation and work up to composing/performing! I'm at university so getting good gear and transporting it around will be a little problem, but I'll figure something out.

In terms of my tastes, I mostly prefer indie / alt music (the strokes, animal collective, deerhunter, etc.), but also stuff like Tool. Not really jazz for now, and not really death metal or anything. Also, my favorite drummer right now is Greg Saunier from Deerhoof. I just saw him live a few days ago! (skip to 3:10).

I'm not really a musical person (math/computer science, actually), but I have lots of experience learning new things so I think I might be able to compensate for it. I've started learning 4-Way Coordination as per the recommendation of a friend, and it's going great so far. Over the next month or so I'm going to get my fundamentals with this book and trying to play along to my favorite songs.

I was told to look into Stick Control in addition to 4-Way Coordination. Will these two be sufficient for a technical foundation, or are they lacking (or too in depth)? I'm trying to make sure I don't have any holes or bad habits, but also be as efficient as possible while I learn.

With all that said, it's nice to have found this community of drummers and I look forward to hearing from you guys!




EDIT: Oh, and for my kit, the plan was to look on craigslist for a used mid-quality kit for <$300 preferably. I'd prefer to start minimal: snare, hi-hat, bass, floor tom, ride. Is there a better plan than this? Remember I'm a student!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:21 AM
davidbehrens3.14 davidbehrens3.14 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 149
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

First off, congrats on getting your start! I'm a '19 NC State commit myself. Out of curiosity, where do you go?

Stick Control is a good book (I wouldn't start with 4-way coordination for now; stick to some snare stuff first). Also, Progressive Steps to Syncopation, the Drummer's Cookbook, the Chart Reading Workbook and some others will serve you well.

Teaching yourself is a very tough process. If you can, connect with some drummers and / or educators in your area and learn what you can about technique. This is a crucial aspect of drumming. It's best to learn the right way to play a drum as a musical instrument, and execute with proper habits right off the bat. This will solidify HOW you play.

WHAT you play is very much up to you. You can expand your vocabulary with practice, exercises, and more experience. This will let you express your voice. Your own mind will tell you what's appropriate to play. To help you become confident in this, I'd just recommend listening to a whole lot of music you like.

Hope this helps. Have fun; best of luck!
__________________
It's not about your part... It's about what you're a part of.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:36 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Thanks for the reply David! I'm going to school in Minneapolis, pretty cool indie rock scene here. I'll look into connecting with drummers in the area.. I have some friends in the music school here, and a good friend of mine plays drums in marching band.


Could you (or someone else) help comment on the following kits and say if they are good or bad for my situation? I have no idea what constitutes a good drum, except that certain brands (e.g. Yamaha) are good.

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...906980811.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ws...938415807.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...907104238.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/an...897182681.html

I think the third one looks pretty neat, especially if I can recoup my costs relatively easily.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:36 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

I wish there were an "I just decided I wanted to get into drums" FAQ.

You have a number of options, work, and challenges ahead. Grab a practice pad and some sticks and give everything a lot of consideration while you practice for a few weeks. Talk to some drumming friends. A few questions to ask yourself.

* Will anything impede your learning? If you were to buy an acoustic kit, would it fit in your dwelling? Could you practice at any hour?

*What's your goal? Play in a band? Play in hippy drum circles? Learn an instrument as a hobby to inspire your future children? Play as a profession?

*In a year, what kind of financial investment are you looking to make into the hobby? You can find a poplar kit with single braced stands and B8's on Craigslist for $300 , but should you?

*How much time are you looking to dedicate? Are you going to cancel your Warcraft and/or Eve-Online subscription? Will drumming end up competing with work/education/girlfriend?


In the mean time, grab a practice pad and some 5a's at you local music store. Practice while you give it though, look for kits online, and figure out where you're headed.

Last edited by KamaK; 03-20-2015 at 06:50 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:42 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Could you (or someone else) help comment on the following kits and say if they are good or bad for my situation? I have no idea what constitutes a good drum, except that certain brands (e.g. Yamaha) are good.

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...906980811.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ws...938415807.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...907104238.html
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/an...897182681.html
The two Ludwigs are Accents. Asian made 9 ply poplar. Their only association with Ludwig is the sticker, and it literally is 'a sticker'. Pass.

The Yamaha's are decent, and come with a decent pedal. It's by far the best of the bunch.

Pass on the Percussion Plus kit.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:46 AM
davidbehrens3.14 davidbehrens3.14 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 149
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

In regards to the kits, that Stage Custom is a great deal. I couldn't tell by the pictures if it was a Stage Custom Advantage (which would be a LITTLE worse), but either way, for $400, that is pretty perfect for your situation.

Also, big +1 to everything KamaK said. Again, good luck.
__________________
It's not about your part... It's about what you're a part of.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-20-2015, 06:52 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
I wish there were an "I just decided I wanted to get into drums" FAQ.
Yeah, sorry if I'm repeating a lot of beginner questions.

Quote:
You have a number of options, work, and challenges ahead. Grab a practice pad and some sticks and give everything a lot of consideration while you practice for a few weeks. A few questions to ask yourself.

* Will anything impede your learning? If you were to buy an acoustic kit, would it fit in your dwelling? Could you practice at any hour?

*What's your goal? Play in a band? Play in hippy drum circles? Learn an instrument as a hobby to inspire your future children? Play as a profession?

*In a year, what kind of financial investment are you looking to make into the hobby? You can find a poplar kit with single braced stands and B8's on Craigslist, but should you?

*How much time are you looking to dedicate? Are you going to cancel your Warcraft and/or Eve-Online subscription?


In the mean time, grab a practice pad and some 5a's at you local music store. Practice while you give it though, look for kits online, and figure out where you're headed.

I actually have been practicing for a few weeks now, and I think I can mostly answer the questions you've raised:

1. I can't play in my apartment, so I will need to find a friend's house to jam in at certain times (2 candidates lined up)
2. Playing in a band and/or expressing creativity and getting my energy out, both of which are fun.
3. I think after 3-4 months if I'm still interested then I am willing to actually invest in the hobby. I've been very interested and practicing for 2 weeks now, so that's a good sign.
4. I've been doing 30-60m every day, and will continue that trend till the summer (when I will leave my stuff for an internship :( )

Thanks for checking out the craigslist things - is the Yamaha one good enough to pull the trigger on? I've already got my sticks, so seems like I just need the symbols/hi-hat afterwards, yeah?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-20-2015, 07:10 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Yeah, sorry if I'm repeating a lot of beginner questions.

I actually have been practicing for a few weeks now, and I think I can mostly answer the questions you've raised:
The apartment thing is probably going to be your biggest hurdle. Not having your own place for your kit and having restricted access is always a hardship.

The typical way I see everyone going is $300 CL kit till they improve enough to justify something more expensive. Sometimes people jump right in at the $750 mark with a Stage Custom and some quality used cymbals. If you're like me you'll buy a $300 Ludwig Accent, realize the mistake, and spend $2k on a high quality set 4 months later.

These days, there's another alternative, and that is the e-kit. While it would probably solve the issue of practicing in your apartment, it's a bit like trying to learn to ride a bicycle on an exercise bike. You'll lack certain fundamentals until you play on a real kit. A saving grace is that you can resell them on CL pretty easily to the next person who wants to learn to play drums.

Mull it over, I'm sure other opinions will come in shortly.

Last edited by KamaK; 03-20-2015 at 07:24 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-20-2015, 01:35 PM
mikel mikel is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midlands. England.
Posts: 2,266
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

I am still un decided as to wether the internet is always a good thing. I dont know what prompted the OP to want to play drums (probably the internet) but sometimes you can have too much information, most of it conflicting.

If you "realy" want to play the drums you will do it. You will play on tables chairs, sofa cusions, whatever. Its a compulsion, you dont need to ask others what you should do. Find your own way, be different, dont blindly follow the crowd or the "Recognised" way. Its Rock and Roll, there is no right or wrong, thats the beauty of music.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-20-2015, 11:37 PM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikel View Post
I am still un decided as to wether the internet is always a good thing. I dont know what prompted the OP to want to play drums (probably the internet) but sometimes you can have too much information, most of it conflicting.

If you "realy" want to play the drums you will do it. You will play on tables chairs, sofa cusions, whatever. Its a compulsion, you dont need to ask others what you should do. Find your own way, be different, dont blindly follow the crowd or the "Recognised" way. Its Rock and Roll, there is no right or wrong, thats the beauty of music.

I think your concern is a bit unfounded, at least in my case. The internet didn't inspire me to learn the drums; good music did. I'm not asking others for what to do, per se, I've already started drumming on my own and I want to make sure I'm learning as best as I can. The internet is nice because you don't have to rely on people in your life or a friend of a friend to give you information ... you can just ask experienced people from all over and you will get quality advice.

If the goal is to become proficient at the drums, there most certainly is a wrong way to learn! I have a lot of experience learning stuff on my own (languages, programming), and learning things the right way first time saves a lot of time in the long run.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-21-2015, 12:51 AM
JacobDB JacobDB is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Greensboro, NC, USA
Posts: 54
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
If the goal is to become proficient at the drums, there most certainly is a wrong way to learn! I have a lot of experience learning stuff on my own (languages, programming), and learning things the right way first time saves a lot of time in the long run.
There is definitely a wrong way to learn which include picking up bad habbits that could inhibit you improving your skill. To be honest, that yamaha kit is probably the best, but it's also the most expensive and viewing the ad, doesn't look like it comes with much. Even if you buy entry level cymbals, you're still looking at a couple hundred dollars. Like others said before, it really depends on how comfortable you are and how much you want to invest (especially in regards to being in college).

Like KamaK said, I would recommend getting an Electronic kit at first. Then you could play in your apartment at any time with headphones or play along to songs and worry about getting an acoustic set later.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-24-2015, 01:00 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Not really into an electric kit, I don't want to build up bad habits and I have a practice pad + house I can go to with a real kit.

Just found a Tama Rockstar kit on CL at $250.. the Yamaha one was sold already :( Is this a good buy? Doesn't look like they are made out of poplar.

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ws...942554597.html
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-24-2015, 01:27 AM
pgm554's Avatar
pgm554 pgm554 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 1,471
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Try your local Guitar Center,they often get in decent kits at a fraction of the cost of new.
Plus they have a 30 day money back guarantee even on used.
__________________
Pearl MCX Gretsch Renown and many many Fibes snares.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-24-2015, 02:42 AM
No Way Jose's Avatar
No Way Jose No Way Jose is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Between the hi hat and floor tom
Posts: 874
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Just found a Tama Rockstar kit on CL at $250.. the Yamaha one was sold already :( Is this a good buy? Doesn't look like they are made out of poplar.
The Tama Rockstar kit looks interesting. Figure another USA $ 100 + for stands and basic pedals.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-24-2015, 04:18 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by No Way Jose View Post
The Tama Rockstar kit looks interesting. Figure another USA $ 100 + for stands and basic pedals.
My main concern is buying a crummy poplar kit (?), and then immediately wanting to buy a better kit (e.g. yamaha stage customs) and losing money on the crummy kit. So, is the price good enough that I could resell them and potentially break even, and will they be sufficient (not great) for practicing, jamming with friends, and perhaps some small gigs eventually?

Oh, and the is your +$100 USD for cymbals as well? Can I make due with just a hi-hat and ride, or do I really need a crash? I also feel like 3 toms is a bit excessive.

EDIT: These just popped up: http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/an...937831813.html . Googling seems to indicate Artstars are good kits, though the condition is a bit questionable here.

Last edited by Vareee; 03-24-2015 at 07:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-24-2015, 02:38 PM
STXBob's Avatar
STXBob STXBob is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA USA
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm554 View Post
Try your local Guitar Center,they often get in decent kits at a fraction of the cost of new.
Plus they have a 30 day money back guarantee even on used.
THIS. In fact, hit *any* local music store and look at the used racks. Don't fanny about with CL unless you don't have a music store within a couple hours' drive. From your posts with Craigslist links, I deduce you are in the Twin Cities area. Google tells me there are a bunch of music stores, including at least two Guitar Centers, within your metro area.

You can make do with any ol' kit, but it *always* means an investment in new heads and scrupulous tuning. Inexpensive, beginner kits are tricky to bring to playable condition, trickier to make sound "good", and both require a level of experience you don't really have yet. I fear you'll get irritated at the crappy sound and drop your new pursuit prematurely.

Vareee, your mission, should you choose to accept it, is this:

1. Before you buy anything at all, find an acquaintance who is an experienced drumset player. Surely you know someone. Even if you don't know anybody directly, you'll no doubt be able to find someone in the music program at your university who can refer you to a percussion major or even the professor of percussion. Hell, grab the bull by the horns and call the percussion professor! You want to take an experienced player/gear-head with you on your shopping trips, lest you buy a lemon. While you're at it, get a referral from the professor for a private teacher, because you must...

2. Start taking lessons. Now. At once. Even if it's from the above-mentioned percussion-emphasis music ed major, and you're paying her a sixer of PBR for the lesson, START NOW. If you're serious, commit. Commitment means guidance, young Padawan. ;-)
__________________
Cheers,

Bob Davis

www.reconstructinghistory.com
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-24-2015, 10:55 PM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by STXBob View Post
THIS. In fact, hit *any* local music store and look at the used racks. Don't fanny about with CL unless you don't have a music store within a couple hours' drive. From your posts with Craigslist links, I deduce you are in the Twin Cities area. Google tells me there are a bunch of music stores, including at least two Guitar Centers, within your metro area.

You can make do with any ol' kit, but it *always* means an investment in new heads and scrupulous tuning. Inexpensive, beginner kits are tricky to bring to playable condition, trickier to make sound "good", and both require a level of experience you don't really have yet. I fear you'll get irritated at the crappy sound and drop your new pursuit prematurely.

Vareee, your mission, should you choose to accept it, is this:

1. Before you buy anything at all, find an acquaintance who is an experienced drumset player. Surely you know someone. Even if you don't know anybody directly, you'll no doubt be able to find someone in the music program at your university who can refer you to a percussion major or even the professor of percussion. Hell, grab the bull by the horns and call the percussion professor! You want to take an experienced player/gear-head with you on your shopping trips, lest you buy a lemon. While you're at it, get a referral from the professor for a private teacher, because you must...

2. Start taking lessons. Now. At once. Even if it's from the above-mentioned percussion-emphasis music ed major, and you're paying her a sixer of PBR for the lesson, START NOW. If you're serious, commit. Commitment means guidance, young Padawan. ;-)

Does it change things if I know the first kit I buy will be temporary, and my main goal will be to maximize the resale value (while still playing a kit that sounds OK)? That would mean I can look for something like a Yamaha Stage Custom (or similar) on CL, try to get a good deal, and the recoup most of my money when I try to upgrade. I'm also probably moving within a year so that's why I'm a bit nervous about dropping $500+ on a music store kit I know I'll lose money on. Remember I'm a college student! :)

Thanks for pushing me towards the lessons, that seems like the right thing to do for sure.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-24-2015, 11:17 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Does it change things if I know the first kit I buy will be temporary, and my main goal will be to maximize the resale value (while still playing a kit that sounds OK)?
Therein lies the dilemma.

When I started, I grabbed a Ludwig Accent and B8's on craigslist. 3 months and one lesson later, I was shopping for a real kit. I gave my Ludwig to my neighbor to bang around on. Had I not been blessed with financial stability, it would have sucked to be me.

A Yamaha Stage Custom falls somewhere between an intermediate kit, and a player's kit. Even professionals will use them without regret, usually as a secondary or stage kit. It will serve you well for the foreseeable future.

There are certain inexpensive staple instruments that seem to perform beyond their monetary value. New-beat high-hats. Yama Stage Customs. Ludwig Acrolites. If I were being thrifty on a first kit, this would be the direction I would take.

There are other options that may give you more for less, but that usually requires saving-searches and watch listing items. For example: Here's a Renown Maple for $50 currently... If you can land that for $350-$400 shipped, it's a hell of a deal.

Last edited by KamaK; 03-24-2015 at 11:55 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-25-2015, 02:35 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
Therein lies the dilemma.

When I started, I grabbed a Ludwig Accent and B8's on craigslist. 3 months and one lesson later, I was shopping for a real kit. I gave my Ludwig to my neighbor to bang around on. Had I not been blessed with financial stability, it would have sucked to be me.

A Yamaha Stage Custom falls somewhere between an intermediate kit, and a player's kit. Even professionals will use them without regret, usually as a secondary or stage kit. It will serve you well for the foreseeable future.

There are certain inexpensive staple instruments that seem to perform beyond their monetary value. New-beat high-hats. Yama Stage Customs. Ludwig Acrolites. If I were being thrifty on a first kit, this would be the direction I would take.

There are other options that may give you more for less, but that usually requires saving-searches and watch listing items. For example: Here's a Renown Maple for $50 currently... If you can land that for $350-$400 shipped, it's a hell of a deal.
Awesome, I will keep new-beats and acrolites in mind for the future. Sorry to be using this thread as a price-check for CL, but I found another set of Stage Customs for $380 (negotiated). Will this be better than what I'll find at a music shop? I'm really itching to get on an actual kit sometime soon.

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/an...899160219.html
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-25-2015, 02:39 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
I found another set of Stage Customs for $380 (negotiated). Will this be better than what I'll find at a music shop?
http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/an...899160219.html
Good kit. Good price. Comes with a usable snare. Unoffensive/Neutral color (easy resale). Looks like a 2014?

You're going to have to budget for hardware and cymbals.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-25-2015, 02:44 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
Good kit. Good price. Comes with a usable snare. Unoffensive/Neutral color (easy resale). Looks like a 2014?

You're going to have to budget for hardware and cymbals.
Looks like it's going to be a bass pedal, snare + stand + pedal, ride+stand, and throne? I'm fine with a more minimal setup. Would a drum shop be the best place to get this piecewise stuff?
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-25-2015, 03:50 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,654
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Looks like it's going to be a bass pedal, snare + stand + pedal, ride+stand, and throne? I'm fine with a more minimal setup.
Hardware: Pedal/Throne. Hat stand, snare stand, and 2 booms.
Cymbals: Hats, Crash, Ride.

I don't know what to recommend for hardware. So much of it is crap, and so much of it is overpriced. You can compromise on the quality of the stands if the kit doesn't move around too much, but the throne, the BD pedal, and to a lesser extent the hat, are tightly coupled to the player. You're going to have to sort that out locally with what's available. Same with Cymbals.

On the up side, GC's used inventory can be ordered and has a 30d return if you eat the shipping. There's about a 15% premium on their used gear, but you can still snag a pair of 14" new-beats for $125 that should clean up real nice.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-26-2015, 12:35 AM
STXBob's Avatar
STXBob STXBob is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA USA
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vareee View Post
Does it change things if I know the first kit I buy will be temporary, and my main goal will be to maximize the resale value (while still playing a kit that sounds OK)? That would mean I can look for something like a Yamaha Stage Custom (or similar) on CL, try to get a good deal, and the recoup most of my money when I try to upgrade. I'm also probably moving within a year so that's why I'm a bit nervous about dropping $500+ on a music store kit I know I'll lose money on. Remember I'm a college student! :)
"I know it's temporary" will only get you so far if the kit you buy sounds like ca-ca. You can only grit your teeth so long.

With a kit like a Stage Custom, you might find yourself not wanting to upgrade. That's a solid, pretty instrument with excellent sound. Price-wise, it really punched above its weight. For example, the kit you linked to (the last link you posted) is a good buy. You could play that for years to come and be totally satisfied with it. Marry that Yamaha with good cymbals and you're good to go.

One more insistent demand: Do not skimp on cymbals. Pro-level cymbals + entry-level kit = good sound. Pro-level drums + cheap cymbals = crap sound. If that means you have to add to your setup one at a time over months, rather than buying it all immediately, do that. Buying used is a good idea. There are also excellent-sounding cymbals with entry-level pricing, like Paiste PST 7 and Istanbul Agop Xist. If you have to buy new, keep those in mind (of course, those lines sounding "excellent" is my opinion, which is entirely subjective).

Quote:
Thanks for pushing me towards the lessons, that seems like the right thing to do for sure.
Damn skippy. ;-P
__________________
Cheers,

Bob Davis

www.reconstructinghistory.com
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-26-2015, 12:47 AM
STXBob's Avatar
STXBob STXBob is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA USA
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Okay, I lied. One MORE insistent demand: Do not skimp on your throne/seat. Get the best you can possibly afford. An uncomfortable seat means you won't play/practice, which will make this whole affair pointless.

Trust me on this one, okay? This is experience talking. I thought I was getting a bargain. I should have bought the one I liked but talked myself out of because it was twice as $pendy as the one I initially chose. I ended up going back and buying the expensive one anyway.

That reminds me, I wanted to address that as part of my response to your earlier comment of "buying with intent to flip" and my advice about cymbals.

Don't do it.

This is your instrument. This is your voice. It's how you express yourself. If you go buying something cheap because "that'll do," you not only compromise your voice, you are deliberately throwing good money after bad. Chances are you're not going to make your money back. Ever. Used gear is like that. Go for what speaks to you, what makes your hairs stand on end. If it means you have to wait until you can sell enough plasma or sperm to buy THAT CYMBAL, bloody well WAIT. Don't buy some POS B8Pro or Meinl HCS or Zildjian ZBT sh!t "too see me through" "because I can maybe make nearly as much as I spent on it". Exercise restraint and wisdom.

Here's the math in case the words don't convince you. You're in the music store, you're shopping for a crash, and you've got $200. There's a B8Pro crash there for $185, and a Zildjian A Custom for $220. You LOVE the A Custom. But you buy the Sabian. Then, later, you upgrade to the Zildjian.

That math is simple. You haven't spent $185. You've spent $405. Yeah, you might get $50-75 for your old B8 on the used market, but even if you factor that in you've still spent $330 instead of $220. On what planet does that make sense? Save the other $20 and buy what you WANT. The FIRST time.

This message brought to you by HOLYCRAPI'VEWASTEDALOTOFTIME and the number -$LOTS

:-D
__________________
Cheers,

Bob Davis

www.reconstructinghistory.com
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-26-2015, 01:02 AM
Vareee Vareee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 25
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Thanks guys, you don't know how useful your advice has been.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
Hardware: Pedal/Throne. Hat stand, snare stand, and 2 booms.
Cymbals: Hats, Crash, Ride.

I don't know what to recommend for hardware. So much of it is crap, and so much of it is overpriced. You can compromise on the quality of the stands if the kit doesn't move around too much, but the throne, the BD pedal, and to a lesser extent the hat, are tightly coupled to the player. You're going to have to sort that out locally with what's available. Same with Cymbals..
Quote:
Originally Posted by STXBob View Post
One more insistent demand: Do not skimp on cymbals. Pro-level cymbals + entry-level kit = good sound. Pro-level drums + cheap cymbals = crap sound. If that means you have to add to your setup one at a time over months, rather than buying it all immediately, do that. Buying used is a good idea. There are also excellent-sounding cymbals with entry-level pricing, like Paiste PST 7 and Istanbul Agop Xist. If you have to buy new, keep those in mind (of course, those lines sounding "excellent" is my opinion, which is entirely subjective).
My goal is to get the rest of my kit for <$200 if possible. I'm tracking a few new beat cymbals/rides on ebay (e.g. THIS. Don't out bid me please :P). Also prowling Craiglist for some good stuff - I'm not a metal drummer or anything so it seems like the hardware quality won't matter too much. Main concerns are cymbals, a decent bass pedal (I want to learn heel-toe or slide) and a good hi-hat stand.

Progress so far..

-Found a crappy set of hardware for $50 that might serve me for the very near future so I can actually start playing: http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...947017420.html
-Found a ZHT ride which is supposedly OK: http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ra...847579283.html
---And the guy has other stuff for sale, and I quote: "My ride is still for sale. I also have an old Tama kick pedal I’d sell for $20, a straight stand I could sell for $20, and an old hi-hat stand I could sell for $10. The pedal and cymbal stand are in good shape, but the hi-hat stand rod is bent a bit, which is why I would sell it for $10."
-Emailed a bunch of people with decent kits if they'd be willing to part with their cymbals/hardware.

Imagine there's a world where I get the $50 hardware and then the ebay New Beats for $150, then a throne somewhere. Reckon that will suffice? I'll pick up a crash when I feel like it, not a big fan right now.



EDIT: Just saw your second post STXBob -- thanks for the advice. A few years ago I got into dressing well (clothing), and that's normally the rule of thumb there too. Buy good stuff that lasts and you'll like, and you sort of save money in the long run.

Still, I do need to be concerned about the cost, and doubly so because I haven't even sat behind a kit yet and know how much I like drumming. I think there's value in tentative but smart first purchases (e.g. these sweet yamaha stage customs) that aren't risky. At this point in my life it's a little scary to throw $500+ at a new hobby within the first month, so hopefully my apprehension is understandable.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-26-2015, 03:47 AM
STXBob's Avatar
STXBob STXBob is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA USA
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: College kid getting into drums - first steps?

Your apprehension is totally understandable. You've reached the age where new hobbies have a rather higher bar to entry than before. Try picking up historical Western martial arts! That rig can cost upwards of $2000 if you do it right. At least bargain shopping for drum gear doesn't mean you run the risk of having bones broken if safety equipment fails. :-)

We are of one mind when it comes to quality. I own three suits. I had them made in London while I was there on vacation. I've had them for 15 years and they show not the slightest sign of wear. They'll last me the rest of my life. Quality is worth the higher price! (Though a higher price doesn't necessarily mean higher quality.)
__________________
Cheers,

Bob Davis

www.reconstructinghistory.com
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com