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  #1  
Old 03-21-2015, 09:11 PM
Patch Patch is offline
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Default Another drum recording/mixing thread

I'm not sure if there has been a previous discussion of this topic, and searching didn't do me much good. Anyway, I have a 4 mic recording setup for my 4 piece kit and have a few questions about how I can get the best sound out of my situation. I have one mic dedicated for snare, and another for the kick, but I'm messing around with different options for the other two mics. I'm leaning towards using the last two mics for overheads, but am open for other suggestions to try and get solid tom sounds along with good cymbal clarity as well. My main question is once I record, (I'm using garageband with a behringer fca1616 audio interface), what is the best way to mix a 4 microphone set up? Any information will be very helpful! Thanks!
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:42 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=121114

If you're only recording drums (no other instruments present), then grab two large diaphragm condensers. Set them up in X/Y, ORTF, Spaced pair, Glynn, or Recorderman config.

Let the LDC's capture the ambient sound. Let the other mics capture feature instruments (kick and snare typically).
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Old 03-21-2015, 10:35 PM
ermghoti ermghoti is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

Overheads first. capture the kit as well as possible with those two mikes. Add others to reinforce the overheads, or for effects sends. The traditional hierarchy would be OH->kick->snare->toms->hats->other.

Mixing is the same. Go as far as possible with just the OH, add the others more or less in the order above. When it stops getting better, stop adding things. Four mikes will do plenty.
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Old 03-21-2015, 11:04 PM
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keep it simple keep it simple is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

I've just started to experiment with a 3 mic setup in my demo room. Way less than ideal recording space :( It's straight to 2 track in the camera, & no EQ either, so completely reliant on great sounding drums & mic placement. Although that's very restrictive, it does encourage you to get the basics right.

I'm used to getting great captures in a studio environment too, & the preparation is the same, even though there's much more post adjustment possibility. Foundation is everything.

For a number of reasons, I'm using the overheads (little NT5's) at shoulder height, & getting good tom body capture without close mic'ing as reinforcement. No real need for a snare mic either. Although crude, I find the shoulder overhead position picks up what I'm hearing nicely, & that keeps everything in balance, leaving only the bass drum resonant head needing a separate mic.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:07 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

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Originally Posted by keep it simple View Post
No real need for a snare mic either.
Indeed. When I mic the snare, it's typically from the bottom to catch the sizzle that an LDC may miss. The overheads capture close to 100%, and I blend the sizzle in for a little Max Weinberg action. With Glyn and Recorderman, there's even less of a need for an auxiliary snare mic as there's an LDC directly above the snare.

@OP: Understand that you'll want to experiment with different overhead LDC positions. There's no 'right' way of doing it, and you have to choose the configuration that best fits the song.

It wil also make you a better player, as you'll learn how to self-mix while playing.
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:02 AM
Patch Patch is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'll try focusing more on the sound of the overhead mics. As for EQing the tracks, does anyone have any suggestions or basic guidelines for a simple EQ method?
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:52 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Another drum recording/mixing thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patch View Post
Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'll try focusing more on the sound of the overhead mics. As for EQing the tracks, does anyone have any suggestions or basic guidelines for a simple EQ method?
If you're doing an exposition with drums-only, leave everything as raw as possible. Find any offensive frequencies and kill them. Find frequencies that are deficient due to mic quality or positioning and restore them.

If you're going to place it to an ensemble, do the same as above but reduce the frequency bands that are in other players' sonic space. There's a few good youtube videos that touch on this.

If you need to increase the volume of a particular instrument (a tom for example), find it's dominant frequency and nudge it. Work in 3 db increments if you have an immature ear. Mix/EQ in mono, and save stereo separation as a a post-mix step. Watch (with your eyes) for phase bogosity.
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