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  #6441  
Old 01-10-2016, 03:08 AM
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Stevesmithfan Stevesmithfan is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Gavin,

I wanted to know your opinion about the current trend of online drum schools. Do you think it's better for the student to have a one on one lesson with a private instructor in the same room?
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  #6442  
Old 01-12-2016, 03:22 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi Duck Tape

I tried the unison thing on the snare drum tonight, I haven't used a pad in a long time. I was often able to make them hit perfectly together. Do you think practising these unison singles will help me? If so what should I do? Just go through a few different tempos?

This is an exercise that's only really possible on a practise pad to clearly understand what's going on. I have found it useful to feel 'calibrated' and feel sure that my hands (and in later exercises my feet) are landing where I'm intending them to land and are sounding 'in sync' with each other. That's when (on the drumset) things start to sound and feel good to me.

Hi Stevesmithfan

I wanted to know your opinion about the current trend of online drum schools. Do you think it's better for the student to have a one on one lesson with a private instructor in the same room?

I don't think I have a helpful opinion on this as I don't teach private lessons nor have I given any online lessons. When I was having lessons - these kind of options didn't exsist. I would say it's better to be in the same room - but for many reasons such as location, availablity and cost - it's not always possible to be in the same room.
Interestingly enough I have participated in a couple of drum festivals last year where I 'virtually' appeared on a screen at the event whilst I was at home in my studio. It was quite strange at first - but the interaction with the audience was kind of the same. Drummers asked me questions and I could answer and demonstrate on my drumset in real time. It was fun for me.

cheers
Gavin
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  #6443  
Old 01-24-2016, 06:05 PM
french_cat french_cat is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin!

Can't say it often enough: I think it's really awesome that you take the time to answer all these questions.

Here's mine:
Are you planning on doing any clinics in 2016 in Germany (/Europe)?

I missed the ones in 2015 and I'm SO regretting it.


Thanks in advance for your answer!
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  #6444  
Old 01-26-2016, 06:17 AM
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willregnier willregnier is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I have a question regarding working with a mixing engineer.

I know you've mixed your Cheating The Polygraph album & the 05Ric records and also you've been involved in the PT mixing process.

I'm doing a few studio sessions these days and most of the time, I'm really disappointed of how the mix turns out. I like when I hear my drumkit as a whole. Sometimes the different drums of the kit sound like they're all in different places and the balance is not representative to the volume you played each parts of the kit. Instead of placing the overheads and building the drum sound around them, they use them for the cymbals only and separate everything instead of blending all the parts together. I'm aware that mixing requires a lot of compromises but I know the drums could sound better - better to me at least - and I find it really frustrating/disapointing. I'm sure you know what I mean...

How do you manage to work with the mixing engineer when you almost or totally can't be involved in the mixing process? Do you send him a mixed demo or reference tracks?

How do you deal with mixes that bothers you or don't recreates properly the way you're hearing your drumset?

And finally, do you make any arrangements when you're hired by an artist to approve the drums before the final mixes get released?

Thanks a lot for your time and inspiration.

Will

Last edited by willregnier; 01-26-2016 at 07:27 PM. Reason: english mistakes
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  #6445  
Old 01-27-2016, 02:47 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi french_cat

Are you planning on doing any clinics in 2016 in Germany (/Europe)?

No clinics planned at the moment. I will be teaching a day or two at UDE just outside London around the end of May /start of June. http://www.ultimatedrumexperience.co.uk/

Hi willregnier

I have a question regarding working with a mixing engineer.
I'm doing a few studio sessions these days and most of the time, I'm really disappointed of how the mix turns out.
How do you manage to work with the mixing engineer when you almost or totally can't be involved in the mixing process? Do you send him a mixed demo or reference tracks?

When I make recordings from my home studio I always send them a stereo mix of my drums - the way I like to hear them and how I felt I played them. 95% of the time they want all the individual tracks as well. If they've hired a 'mix engineer' that's usually the thing they most want to sink their teeth into and try to prove to the world that they can really mix drums.

How do you deal with mixes that bothers you or don't recreates properly the way you're hearing your drumset?

There comes a point (if you're just hired as a session drummer) that you have to let go and let them do what they want (it's not your album after all). I can't think of a single instance where the engineer made a better mix of my drums than I did (according to me) and I'm usually pretty disappointed when I hear the final thing. Sometimes they have used my stereo mix - but killed the drum sound in the mastering process.

do you make any arrangements when you're hired by an artist to approve the drums before the final mixes get released?

I have done that in the past (but - like journalists who promise similar things about sending you interviews before they're released) they quite often forget (or don't want to). Next thing you know it's been released and it's too late to do anything about it. You either have to take a relaxed attitude to it and let whatever happens not bother you - or you just don't do these things. There's not much in the middle.

Cheers
Gavin
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  #6446  
Old 01-29-2016, 07:40 PM
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Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin, hope all is well.

I know you're a big Art Farmer fan and I checked out Crawl Space and really enjoyed it. What other Art Farmer albums do you recommend? What are some of your other favourite Gadd albums?

Also, are you a Steely Dan fan?

I also wanted to tell you that the Cheating the Polygraph surround mix is fantastic. Awesome stuff.

Cheers,

Quinn
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Last edited by Lightbulb_Sun; 01-30-2016 at 06:44 PM.
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  #6447  
Old 02-02-2016, 03:07 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi Lightbulb_Sun

I know you're a big Art Farmer fan and I checked out Crawl Space and really enjoyed it. What other Art Farmer albums do you recommend? What are some of your other favourite Gadd albums?

Two of my favourite Steve Gadd recordings are "Crawl Space" and "Big Blues" (Art Farmer and Jim Hall). Mad Hatter (Chick Corea) is amazing too.

Also, are you a Steely Dan fan?


Absolutely !

cheers
Gavin
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  #6448  
Old 02-03-2016, 09:43 PM
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Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavin Harrison View Post
Hi Lightbulb_Sun

I know you're a big Art Farmer fan and I checked out Crawl Space and really enjoyed it. What other Art Farmer albums do you recommend? What are some of your other favourite Gadd albums?

Two of my favourite Steve Gadd recordings are "Crawl Space" and "Big Blues" (Art Farmer and Jim Hall). Mad Hatter (Chick Corea) is amazing too.

Also, are you a Steely Dan fan?


Absolutely !

cheers
Gavin
Hey Gavin!

Thanks a ton, I'll check those two out as soon as possible.

Awesome! My father introduced me to Steely Dan pretty recently and I've gotten really into them. Steve Gadd's fills in the Aja title track are phenomenal. I haven't gotten around to checking out the album Gaucho yet, but I've heard it's great and I know Gadd is in it for a track or two.

Although not Gadd, I really love the drumming on tracks like Negative Girl, The Fez and Pretzel Logic. Really tasteful stuff.

If you don't mind me asking, what's your favourite Steely Dan album?

Lastly, I felt that I needed to seriously practice my buzz rolls (not my strong-suit). How do you practice your buzzes? Did you ever use a certain exercise to help you?

Cheers,

Quinn
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Last edited by Lightbulb_Sun; 02-03-2016 at 10:18 PM.
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  #6449  
Old 02-04-2016, 07:02 PM
Basil Basil is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

I often check on this forum, so informative and interesting to read the forum posts and your answers, Mr. Harrison.

Just curious if there are any plans for a Porcupine Tree reunion in the near future? Or do we have to consider that band broken up?

Have enjoyed your records with O5ric and Cheating the Polygraph of course, haven't had a chance to see King Crimson live, but I really long for some new PT-music. Bands "win" over solo artists (ok, with a few exceptions), musicians always seem to come more into their own in a band as well instead of being a hired session player (ok, with a few exceptions). In fact that's what I think is missing for a guy like Steve Gadd (although you hardly argue with his musical achievements). Jeff Porcaro is problably more famous for his session work, but sincerely his best and most interesting stuff is with Toto, that's where he really was shining as a drummer plus he got a chance to co-arrange and write as well.

And talking about a perfect session-player album, have you heard a Richard Marx song called "Your World" from 1991 with Terry Bozzio on drums? (Marx's "Rush Street" album, which that song was recorded for, is "my" sort of Aja-album).

Crossing my sticks for some new PT music.

Basil
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  #6450  
Old 02-19-2016, 01:21 AM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi Lightbulb_Sun

If you don't mind me asking, what's your favourite Steely Dan album?


The Gaucho !

Lastly, I felt that I needed to seriously practice my buzz rolls (not my strong-suit). How do you practice your buzzes? Did you ever use a certain exercise to help you?


I don't really have any exercises that I think of that would help playing buzz rolls. I think it was something I could always do. I suppose it is related to hold you hold the sticks and squeeze them when you 'buzz' roll.

Hi Basil

Just curious if there are any plans for a Porcupine Tree reunion in the near future? Or do we have to consider that band broken up?

No the band has not broken up.

Have enjoyed your records with O5ric and Cheating the Polygraph of course, haven't had a chance to see King Crimson live, but I really long for some new PT-music. Bands "win" over solo artists (ok, with a few exceptions), musicians always seem to come more into their own in a band as well instead of being a hired session player (ok, with a few exceptions). In fact that's what I think is missing for a guy like Steve Gadd (although you hardly argue with his musical achievements). Jeff Porcaro is problably more famous for his session work, but sincerely his best and most interesting stuff is with Toto, that's where he really was shining as a drummer plus he got a chance to co-arrange and write as well.


I think Steve Gadd has done ok anyway :-). In my opinion he always plays like a band member in that he contributes to any musical situation. I don't get the feeling he's just going through the motions and just taking the session money.

And talking about a perfect session-player album, have you heard a Richard Marx song called "Your World" from 1991 with Terry Bozzio on drums? (Marx's "Rush Street" album, which that song was recorded for, is "my" sort of Aja-album).

sorry - I've never heard it. One to check out though.

cheers
Gavin
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  #6451  
Old 02-19-2016, 10:53 PM
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Hi Gavin:

I am really enjoying Cheating the Polygraph. Great outing! I, too, am a fan of Patrick Williams' Threshold album and your release has the same feel with stellar musicianship and high energy.

Who else is working today mining the same vein? I love this style. Can you recommend others?

Best regards,
Croc
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  #6452  
Old 02-21-2016, 01:21 AM
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Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
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Hey Gavin!

Thanks for the response.

Is there a chance of any King Crimson shows being recorded for a live DVD or Blu-Ray?

Also, who's idea was it to make the font on Cheating the Polygraph the same font as the one on the PT album, Recordings? I really like the look.

Ever since my last post I have put a lot more time into my buzzes. They're not great, but I have noticed an improvement. It's a shame there's no real exercise. I approach them like doubles except I'm "pressing" them into the snare. It feels like I'm putting way too much energy into each buzz. Should it demand more energy and "work" than a normal double stroke roll?

Thanks for your time,

Quinn
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  #6453  
Old 02-23-2016, 02:57 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi Croc

I am really enjoying Cheating the Polygraph. Great outing! I, too, am a fan of Patrick Williams' Threshold album and your release has the same feel with stellar musicianship and high energy. Who else is working today mining the same vein? I love this style. Can you recommend others?

Thanks. I don't really know who is working in the same vein. Laurence Cottle's own big band and his arrangements of Jaco Pastorius tunes are amazing (some of which you can find on YouTube). I've been enjoying Snarky Puppy - although it's not really focused on the brass arrangements so much as Laurence's work.

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

Is there a chance of any King Crimson shows being recorded for a live DVD or Blu-Ray?

All of the shows last year were multi-tracked recorded and filmed - so I suspect something very good will come out.

Also, who's idea was it to make the font on Cheating the Polygraph the same font as the one on the PT album, Recordings? I really like the look.

The record company suggested it.

Ever since my last post I have put a lot more time into my buzzes. They're not great, but I have noticed an improvement. It's a shame there's no real exercise. I approach them like doubles except I'm "pressing" them into the snare. It feels like I'm putting way too much energy into each buzz. Should it demand more energy and "work" than a normal double stroke roll?

I think they are actually easier to play than a double stroke roll. Of course sometimes they are referred to as "press rolls" and I think if you're only using your thumb and index finger and pressing the notes into the drum head (usually easier to do near the edge of the drum) things should sound nice and blurred.

cheers
Gavin
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  #6454  
Old 02-24-2016, 11:57 AM
TheSoundcage TheSoundcage is offline
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hello from Perth Australia, Gavin.

I've heard your influences growing up and developing have come from the likes of Steve Gadd, Jeff Porcaro and many others. My question is, who are a couple of drummers (well known or not) you've been inspired by, or taken influence from in the past year or so?

Cheers mate,
Marcus.
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  #6455  
Old 02-26-2016, 09:12 PM
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Thanks for your response, Mr. Harrison.
Having just read Mr. Wilson's interview in Prog-magazine, it really looks promising for some new PT music. He also pointed at the pros and cons of writing and arranging songs with higly skilled bandmembers who have their own opinions (which is exactly what I think add quality and interesting dynamics to a lot of music made by bands, though dividing royalties and publishing rights plus serious disagreements in some cases can be a drag of course).
Ok, Steve Gadd was maybe a bad example, he-he.

There is some incredible drumming on "Your World" by Terry Bozzio on Rush Street by Richard Marx (and it reminds me a little bit of you especially with the small splash/mini cymbal spicing he sometimes executes....). And what a list of drummers on that record; Bozzio, Mike Baird, Jeff P, Jonathan Moffett and lo and behold, Tommy Lee. Are there any real drummers recorded at all in today's commercial popmusic?

Basil
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  #6456  
Old 02-27-2016, 01:21 AM
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Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
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Hey Gavin, hope all is well.

That's great news. Also, it's cool to know that you dig Snarky Puppy.. Larnell and Sput are great drummers.

I've been having a blast playing along to the bass line in 21/4 from Steven's "No Twilight Within the Courts of the Sun", a track that you played on. It's a great song to learn to "break" up intimidating time signatures. It's nice to not count it, but to just "feel" the 1. Regarding the fill at 1:40.. What sticking did you use to choke the hihat? Here's a link for reference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXxZkNjKsic It's an incredibly tasty lick. :)

Lastly, I know you guys used a click on stage so that everything was perfectly synced. Why do you still count in the band for a song like Anesthetize or Sound of Muzak if the click is "counting" everybody in? Also, I think you've mentioned that you have recorded yourself "talking" in your ear on top of your click track for certain songs. I'm guessing this was mostly used for tracks like Dark Matter, where there's a lengthy intro that's hard to come in on? It's really quite ingenious.

Cheers,

Quinn

Oh, and Basil, although not exactly "pop", Mark Guiliana is a fantastic drummer who just played on Mr. Bowie's Blackstar.
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  #6457  
Old 02-28-2016, 01:24 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi TheSoundcage

I've heard your influences growing up and developing have come from the likes of Steve Gadd, Jeff Porcaro and many others. My question is, who are a couple of drummers (well known or not) you've been inspired by, or taken influence from in the past year or so?

I like to listen to drummers characters more than their licks or anything really technical. I enjoy hearing great ideas - it gives me an insight into their soul (plus it makes think: why didn't I think of that?) and I get inspired by that.

I often find creative inspiration from things outside of music. Good design can make me feel different (and have a positive affect on me when I'm at the drums). So I haven't really been focusing on any specific drummers that I could give you a couple of names. Sure, I hear a bit of Vinnie Colaiuta and it puts a big smile on my face. Sometime later I might try to channel that energy of what I remember hearing him play - but most likely it will be the essence of what he played rather the exact thing he played. (Not entirely sure I could play exactly what he played anyway). I'm not interested in chops anymore. Only what the person is saying on the instrument. If that requires some ‘big time’ chops then fine. Some people have a lot of chops - but I still might not necessarily like what they are saying.

Hi Devour

For the sake of the question, let's say PT is doing another record and you want to switch to a single pedal for a different approach. Do you know if Steve would be opposed to that?

That's a very strange question. Firstly, I am mostly a single pedal player - but it just so happens that there is another pedal attached to it which (when I feel the moment is right) I might put my left foot on it and do something with it. Steve has never been opposed to that either way. Being a band member means that you trust the other members to do what's right for the situation. I don't tell Steve not to play his "A" string and he doesn't tell me what to do with my bass drum. If we've come up with a riff that requires it - then I'll do what needs to be done.

P.S. Just bought your books. Which do you recommend starting with?


Rhythmic Illusions.

Hi Basil

Are there any real drummers recorded at all in today's commercial popmusic?

I don't listen to today's commercial pop music so I wouldn't really know. I assume so.

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

I've been having a blast playing along to the bass line in 21/4 from Steven's "No Twilight Within the Courts of the Sun", a track that you played on. It's a great song to learn to "break" up intimidating time signatures. It's nice to not count it, but to just "feel" the 1. Regarding the fill at 1:40.. What sticking did you use to choke the hihat? Here's a link for reference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXxZkNjKsic It's an incredibly tasty lick. :)

I can't remember exactly but it sounds like it might be single strokes with the left hand hitting the hi hat.

Lastly, I know you guys used a click on stage so that everything was perfectly synced. Why do you still count in the band for a song like Anesthetize or Sound of Muzak if the click is "counting" everybody in?

Because sometimes not all band members have their 'in-ears' in for the whole show and might only remember to put them in as the song is starting. They might miss the first couple of clicks for instance. Other times they have been distracted by equipment problems or the audience screaming or the lights going off and suddenly they can't see their instrument just as they have to change sounds on a pedal board or keyboard.

Also, I think you've mentioned that you have recorded yourself "talking" in your ear on top of your click track for certain songs. I'm guessing this was mostly used for tracks like Dark Matter, where there's a lengthy intro that's hard to come in on?

Things happen on stage in front of an audience that don't seem to happen in a rehearsal room - things go wrong (as listed above) plus stuff that you just can't imagine ahead of time. On more than one occasion - the audience were clapping along during an intro or a breakdown section - they were so loud - and got faster and faster - that we struggling to hang on to the click. The audible cues just help with those moments - no matter how simple the song.

Cheers
Gavin
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Last edited by Gavin Harrison; 02-28-2016 at 11:19 PM.
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  #6458  
Old 03-03-2016, 12:25 AM
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Hi Gavin,

Could you name approximately three albums that you played on that you really like how your drums sounded in the mix? Could you comment why you personally liked those mixes?

Personally, I especially loved the drums sound on these:
- Nil Reccuring (Porcupine Tree)
- Blood (OSI)
- Cheating The Polygraph (GH)

Though these are a bit different from each other, I really liked how the drums are placed in the mix considering the context.

Also, what's your opinion on mastering? And how it affects the drums sound?

Thanks a lot for your time.

Will
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  #6459  
Old 03-07-2016, 02:11 PM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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HI willregnier

Could you name approximately three albums that you played on that you really like how your drums sounded in the mix? Could you comment why you personally liked those mixes?
Personally, I especially loved the drums sound on these:
- Nil Reccuring (Porcupine Tree)
- Blood (OSI)
- Cheating The Polygraph (GH)


Yes I think those three came out pretty well. They were recorded in my home studio and I had control of the drum sound right up until the finish. I've worked on my drum sound (at home) for nearly 20 years now. Mics and positions have changed slightly over the years - but mostly my mixing skills have improved. When I start to work on a new song I immediately think about how the drums are going to sound in the final mix. I quite often do a quick run through recording (ignoring the arrangement to begin with) to just see how the drums are sitting amongst the other instruments - and I'll start mixing the drums straight away. Working alone (as is most often the case) forces you into the positions of Player, Engineer and Producer.
There's no point me doing lots of takes if the sound isn't right to start with. It's only when I'm happy with the sound that I'll begin wondering about what to play and how to play it.
As I've said before - I try to "play the mix" of the drums. If something is too loud (like the ride cymbal for instance) I'll do it again and just play the ride quieter. Sometimes it might need me to change the ride cymbal because it's not sitting right in the overall mix. If I'm using a lot of my "big room" ambience (and compressing it a lot in the mix) I might not hit any crash cymbals (and overdub them later on) as they are too accentuated in the compression...or use softer sounding crash cymbals such as the Zildjian Crash Of Doom (I have a 20", and custom made 18" and 16").

Also, what's your opinion on mastering? And how it affects the drums sound?

Mastering is indeed a black art and I've witnessed it ruining (in particular) my drum sound on many an occasion. Usually mastering engineers are keen on 'turning up' the whole mix (with compression and limiters) and making it a lot louder. However - whenever I press play to listen to a song (on whatever device) my next move is to put my hand on the volume control (as I don't know what volume is going to appear and how loud I'd like to listen to it that day). Now - if a mastering engineer tells me that they've 'turned up' a mix by 10db then probably I'm going to 'turn down' my listening volume by 10db. But has the sound of the mix changed? Usually it means that the drums have lost some of their attack transients and - relatively - the drums seems quieter than before. It can be very confusing to hear your music in a mastering studio - the room is different - the speakers are different and everything is sounding strange to you before the engineer has even begun messing around with it. I guess you need to find someone who's ears you can trust - and when you play the finished work at home on your regular system (and made the compensation of volume difference) it actually sounds better than before.

cheers
Gavin
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  #6460  
Old 03-07-2016, 06:14 PM
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Hi Gavin:

I understand you have a new drumming mate in King Crimson as Bill Rieflin has announced a sabbatical for 2016. Jeremy Stacey will now sit between you and Pat on the front line. I saw the mighty Crim on both 2014 and 2015 tours and marvelled at the nearly telepathic communication you three had worked so hard to achieve. I hope Bill is okay and wish him well!

Will you approacch the pre-tour practices the same way with Jeremy as in 2013-2014 with you, Bill, and Pat? What might you do differently this time?

Cheers!
Croc
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  #6461  
Old 03-20-2016, 02:11 AM
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Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
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Hi Croc

I understand you have a new drumming mate in King Crimson as Bill Rieflin has announced a sabbatical for 2016. Jeremy Stacey will now sit between you and Pat on the front line. Will you approacch the pre-tour practices the same way with Jeremy as in 2013-2014 with you, Bill, and Pat? What might you do differently this time?


Jeremy lives in London (as do I) so getting together will be quite easy. There's a lot for him to learn - but we do have multi track recordings of all the shows from last year (and video footage too) - so there's plenty to reference. I will meet with him soon and we'll go through the tunes and maybe play along to Pat (and the rest of the band) off the recordings (for now). Later in the year the 3 drummers will rehearse together - just before full band rehearsals begin.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 03-22-2016, 12:54 AM
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Hi Gavin,

What place does the improvisation take into concerts ? Do you improvise into the songs or your objective is to fix a perfect composition that won't move?

Otherwise I consider PT is unique, but do you know a band that is trying to approach the same universe as PT's one? (I'm sick of seeing comparisons with Dream Theater everywhere, they are so rough!)

Thanks a lot for responding, it means a lot to me! And sorry if these questions have been asked hundred times...
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Old 03-27-2016, 01:25 PM
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Hi Emmanuel

What place does the improvisation take into concerts ? Do you improvise into the songs or your objective is to fix a perfect composition that won't move?


Coming from a jazz upbringing - improvisation was always in my blood. It's an exciting challenge that makes every concert unique. I don't criticise those musicians who feel that the songs should be played exactly as the record (including solos and fills) that's just another point of view - however I would go mad if I had to play exactly the same every night. Sometimes I'm the only person iin the room who knows that I'm playing something different - but I'm doing it for myself as much as anyone else. In the King Crimson concerts I play a drum solo every night - and my personal challenge is to play something unique that I haven't played before. Part of my enjoyment is knowing that I'll try to find something new and that it will surprise me. It might not be obvious to the audience (especially if it's the only concert that they've attended) but maybe they can sense that I'm not just regurgitating well rehearsed old licks.
In Porcupine Tree concerts I would vary the subtleties and change most of the fills. There were a few fills that I thought were signature to the composition and that the band were expecting them. Things would develop over the weeks and months of being on tour and usually by the end of the tour I thought we played the songs better. This is quite evident when you hear the live DVDs that were recorded towards the end of a tour.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 04-02-2016, 04:54 AM
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Hi Gavin,

Not mentioning names of course, have you ever played in a live situation where the whole band had different opinions of the tempo on any given night or do you always use a click to save arguments?
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Old 04-13-2016, 06:03 PM
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Hi Stitch Kaboodle

Not mentioning names of course, have you ever played in a live situation where the whole band had different opinions of the tempo on any given night

Yes every band I've been in. Everyone feels the tempo in a slightly different way - and it depends what mood they are in on any particular night.

or do you always use a click to save arguments?

I don't always use a click but it does stop some of the arguments. However some people will push and pull the tempo depending on the night. You have to make them trust you.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 04-16-2016, 04:03 PM
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Great answer, thanks!
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Old 04-18-2016, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
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...You have to make them trust you...

Great perspective!...thanks for that.....
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:29 PM
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

Have you ever had problems with your 12" tom resonating because of the ride? When I use thinner rides, the tom is ringing a lot just by playing the ride. The ride is covering maybe an inch of the tom and is set about 2-3 inches above it.

Thanks!

Will
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Old 04-30-2016, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Gavin I noticed that you sit low. What is your seat height? I also noticed that your left leg is just below the top of your snare drum? Do you ever hit your leg with your left hand when playing rim shots?
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Old 05-01-2016, 01:04 PM
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Hi Gavin,
Im so thankful for this amazing opportunity to being able to ask you questions. I read the whole thread so far and it was very very interesting! Thank you very much for sharing your experience - its priceless!
I also got a few questions for you:

May I start with questions concerning an exercise I recently come up with.
This exercise helps me (right at the moment) to get a way better feeling of my timing; if Im rushing or dragging; if Im laid-back or up-front (and how much) and how good I can feel subdivisons. I would say this exercise is like "ear training" for timing. I called it "Quarters - Back and Forth".
It goes like this: You set up a click to quarter notes (pretty slow tempo, in my case 35 bpm) and try to play quarters exactly on top. then you gradually slow down so that the click "flams" before your hit. Then you get slower so that the flam opens up more and more until you feel that you are playing a subdivison in relation to the click (in the beginning f.e. the note exactly between - like an 8ths displacement, later every subdivision you can think of). Then you slow down so much that you land on top of the click that comes one quarter later. After staying there a while you return to the first click by gradually speeding up taking a little break on subdivison-notes again. I wrote a little pdf-file attached here that makes it more clear.

So my questions are: What do you think about this exercise? Have you already practiced similar things? If you have the time, may you try it out and find out whether you are able to hear if your playing the second note of a 7tuplet or the second note of 32nds in a tempo of 90 bpm? (Because this would mean that you really can hear 10 ms which you mentioned is your "window of acceptance" - and it would be amazing of course :))

Thank you in advance!
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Old 05-08-2016, 09:05 PM
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Hi willregnier

Have you ever had problems with your 12" tom resonating because of the ride? When I use thinner rides, the tom is ringing a lot just by playing the ride. The ride is covering maybe an inch of the tom and is set about 2-3 inches above it.

Like you my ride is very close to the 12" tom and overhangs it by a couple of inches. I tighten the ride down quite a bit so it doesn't swing much - and it never hits the tom. I can't say I've experienced the tom ringing because of the ride cymbal.

Hi Stevesmithfan

Gavin I noticed that you sit low. What is your seat height?

From the floor to the top of the seat 20". But bear in mind that I am 6'2" and I also sit quite a long way back. I've just preferred the feeling of this for many years as I like to sit 'behind' the drums rather than 'on top' of them.

I also noticed that your left leg is just below the top of your snare drum? Do you ever hit your leg with your left hand when playing rim shots?

My left knee is about 7" away from the snare drum and a little bit lower. I have never hit my leg with my left hand.

Hi Robert Schmidt

May I start with questions concerning an exercise I recently come up with.
This exercise helps me (right at the moment) to get a way better feeling of my timing; if Im rushing or dragging; if Im laid-back or up-front (and how much) and how good I can feel subdivisons. I would say this exercise is like "ear training" for timing. I wrote a little pdf-file attached here that makes it more clear. So my questions are: What do you think about this exercise?


I tried your exercise and it's whilst quite interesting - I don't know how useful it would be to me. Maybe you should make a video of this and post it here.

Have you already practiced similar things? If you have the time, may you try it out and find out whether you are able to hear if your playing the second note of a 7tuplet or the second note of 32nds in a tempo of 90 bpm? (Because this would mean that you really can hear 10 ms which you mentioned is your "window of acceptance" - and it would be amazing of course :))

I couldn't easily hear the 7tuplet - at 35bpm. To do that I would have to be subdividing the click by 7. It is already reasonably hard just to stay in time with it - and not flam at all. I could easily hear the 16ths down to the 8th note of course.
I know from having worked with Pro Tools and Logic that it's easy to notice when something is a little bit off and how much to delay something (more or less) when it doesn't feel right. If I'm working on a song and I can hear a midi keyboard playing late - I can have a quite good guess at how many milliseconds I'd want to advance it by to make it 'feel' better (which might not necessarily be perfect).
Sometimes I hear a track where the guitar player is rushing and I might add a 10-30ms delay (depending on how 'out' I though the guitar was) just to bring it 'generally' back into the "window of acceptance" - but of course no human can play accurately and consistently in front of the beat by 30ms. Neither can they play perfectly on the beat all the time. So I suppose you start to gauge when (or by how many milliseconds) generally they are 'going out of time' according to your ears. Some folks will play in front of the beat all the time but by varying amounts. Others will drift in front and behind. Sometimes I hear a drummer and think to myself - I think his bass drum is generally about 15ms early to the rest of his kit.
I might listen back to a recording that I did and focus on a note that I thought was too late or too early and I can measure it on Logic - to see how far out it was. I try not to look at the wave shapes and the grid lines as I'm listening back because they probably all look off (if you are in a high zoom mode). It's better to hear it (or feel it). If I quantised all my notes to the grid - it doesn't sound believable - and I can hear pop record productions where they have quantised the drummer and I just get a feeling about it. Same with 'auto-tune' - I can just hear it.
However - I think it's good to experiment and see how much you can control your own time.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 05-13-2016, 09:55 PM
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Hi Gavin,

A few months ago you wrote about having some of the Zildjian Kerope's.
Wondering how you are finding them and if they are getting much use?
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Old 05-22-2016, 08:30 PM
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Hi Gavin,

I have questions regarding reverb:

In general, what types of reverb do you like to use? Short or long reverb? Small, medium or big rooms?
Which mics do you send to the reverb bus track? All of them? Do you prefer more reverb coming from the close mics or the OHs?

Thanks!

Will

Last edited by willregnier; 05-22-2016 at 11:00 PM. Reason: added a question
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  #6474  
Old 05-23-2016, 12:33 PM
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Hi gwetschdwummer

A few months ago you wrote about having some of the Zildjian Kerope's.
Wondering how you are finding them and if they are getting much use?


yes I really like them - but I've gone back to playing my 21" K Custom Dark Complex Ride as it really suits what I am doing at the moment. The Kerope hi hats are beautiful too.

Hi willregnier

I have questions regarding reverb:
In general, what types of reverb do you like to use? Short or long reverb? Small, medium or big rooms?


I tend to almost always use my big live room. There's nothing quite like real reverb. However I do sometimes add extra reverb (if I don't use much of the big live room) and I tend to use a "Large Wood Room" from Logic's "Space Designer". It has a length of 1.138 seconds

Which mics do you send to the reverb bus track? All of them? Do you prefer more reverb coming from the close mics or the OHs?

I only send the close mics on the snare drum (top mic) and the toms to the reverb plug in. I wouldn't personally send the OH's or the hi hat - it will get very splashy and confused in the mix.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 05-31-2016, 06:41 AM
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Gavin. Did you use buss compression on the overall drum mix for your DVD's?
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Old 06-03-2016, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevesmithfan View Post
Gavin I noticed that you sit low. What is your seat height? I also noticed that your left leg is just below the top of your snare drum? Do you ever hit your leg with your left hand when playing rim shots?
I have the same question .. Gavin
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Old 06-09-2016, 10:32 PM
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Hi Stevesmithfan

Did you use buss compression on the overall drum mix for your DVD's?

I can't honestly remember - I haven't made a DVD in a long time. I have gone through periods of using buss compression (usually a Waves C1 compressor) on the entire drum mix. I don't currently use buss compression. I prefer to compress the snare top and bottom mic separately and sometimes the drum room ambient mics and/or the overheads. It very much depends on the song and the drum sound that I'm tailoring for it. I don't generally compress the toms, hi hat, ride, or bass drum.

Hi davidksmusicschool

I answered this question a few posts back.:-)

cheers
Gavin
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Old 06-12-2016, 05:21 PM
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Hi Gavin.

Thanks a lot for your answer! Im sorry for keeping you wait. Here is a video of me explaining the exercise a little more:

https://youtu.be/jfD8JX-szOI

Very interesting stuff, you further wrote. I also do not look at the grid no more when recording. That really led to moving around every hit. And as you mentioned it becomes surreal. I dont want to do it anymore. For what? It is only self-deception. Its ashamed to me, how many drummers are getting quantised these days. And I think that it isnt always good for the music either. Im just starting out to get a feeling about that when I listen to something as you describe it.

Its crazy. By watching the video of this exercise I can hear myself still being a tiny tiny bit up front when I thought I was exactly on (3:07-3:09). I had to listen really closely to find this out. I mean, of course, for the most times playing live or in a recording situation this should still result in a pretty "ok" performance. But no matter, I want to be able to hear it to make adjustments about it. This brings me to my next question:
Not long ago, I made a recording of a gig I played (whole show to a click). It was pretty terrible. I could hear that I was always trying to line up with the click and therefore the performance was very inconsistent, always rushing or dragging a bit, no groove. Especially it broke the flow when I got a little bit slower to line up again.

So I think, it would be better in such cases (when you notice you are in front of the beat, f.e. after a fill or a tempo change (they had a lot of them and fairly big ones)) to stay in that tempo and then only make an adjustment in an upcoming fill because that wouldnt attract that much attention of the audience. (This is also why I thought about an exercise like this, that helps if you end up somewhere in relation to the click and stay relaxed.) When you notice that your slower than the original tempo, you could slightly increase and it should be fine. Increasing the tempo seems to be sort of a natural thing.

Do you have a similar strategy and/or what are your thoughts on this on?
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Last edited by Robert Schmidt; 06-12-2016 at 10:35 PM.
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Old 06-18-2016, 01:51 PM
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HI Robert Schmidt

Its crazy. By watching the video of this exercise I can hear myself still being a tiny tiny bit up front when I thought I was exactly on (3:07-3:09). I had to listen really closely to find this out. I mean, of course, for the most times playing live or in a recording situation this should still result in a pretty "ok" performance. But no matter, I want to be able to hear it to make adjustments about it.

Its good that you can notice these small timing things. Its an important step to doing something about it. I would just focus on trying to hit all those beats (on the click) as closely as you can. At 35bpm thats not as easy as you think.

This brings me to my next question:
Not long ago, I made a recording of a gig I played (whole show to a click). It was pretty terrible. I could hear that I was always trying to line up with the click and therefore the performance was very inconsistent, always rushing or dragging a bit, no groove. Especially it broke the flow when I got a little bit slower to line up again. So I think, it would be better in such cases (when you notice you are in front of the beat, f.e. after a fill or a tempo change (they had a lot of them and fairly big ones)) to stay in that tempo and then only make an adjustment in an upcoming fill because that wouldnt attract that much attention of the audience. (This is also why I thought about an exercise like this, that helps if you end up somewhere in relation to the click and stay relaxed.) When you notice that your slower than the original tempo, you could slightly increase and it should be fine. Increasing the tempo seems to be sort of a natural thing. Do you have a similar strategy and/or what are your thoughts on this on?


You need to sharpen up your ears so that you can hear when you go off the click (even slightly) and correct it there and then. Dont wait until the next morning when you hear a recording of it. Thats 12 hours too late! You need to be listening (and judging) your performance in real time as its happening. If you hear an early or late note compensate immediately dont wait until the end of the fill or the end of the bar. Sometimes folks dont leave enough room in their mind to actually listen carefully because theyre too consumed in performing the mechanical difficulties of playing the drums. If you find yourself in that position - simplify what you are playing to free up some head space to listen.

cheers
Gavin
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Old 06-18-2016, 06:43 PM
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Hi Gavin:
First of all, sorry for my english and grammar. I'm spanish and it's hard to me to write proper sentences.


If you could play with different brands ( rather than Zildjian, Vic Firth and Sonor), what would they be?

Have you heard the new Red Hot Chili Peppers album ( The getaway)?

Is there any music genre that you want to play but you can't because of lack or oportunities or time?

Cheers mate.
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