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  #41  
Old 12-30-2016, 07:06 PM
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JosephDAqui JosephDAqui is offline
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Default Re: Birch drums

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Originally Posted by Wave Deckel View Post
I guess, you are comparing two types of drumsets that cannot be compared in this case. The Renown has a 30°bearing edge, which dominates its sound way way more than the maple wood, giving it warmth, some kind of mellow tone, while birch sets usually sport a 45° bearing edge, that will automatically give you way more attack and punch once you hit the drums.

Maple and birch can both cut through everything, if the shells meet the design requirements, as well as the heads and the tuning meet the sound requirements. And as long as the drummer with his sticks the playing requirements
Agreed, and I'm up on the technicals. I actually repaired the Renown kit I speak of. The die-cast hoops on the model I had supposedly increase attack, which may be the case, but they didn't cut it in shows or recordings. They were sold quickly. Then there was the DW collectors which were close but the bass drum didn't cut through either - solid mids and lows but not enough attack.

I've played the Yamaha Tour Customs (maple with same specs as stage customs) and Stage customs, same heads, same music (symphonic metal), same hard-hitting and same room. The band noticed the difference immediately. I immediately noticed the difference in the bass drums.

This is just my experience playing metal and hard rock for many years. In all the bands I've been in, they always preferred the birch kit or hybrid birch kit to the maple.
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  #42  
Old 12-30-2016, 10:37 PM
Wave Deckel Wave Deckel is offline
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Default Re: Birch drums

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I had supposedly increase attack, which may be the case, but they didn't cut it in shows or recordings.
Well, that is probably because of the 30° bearing edge. I remember that WhoIsTony posted a thread a few weeks ago, that you might enjoy to read. http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=133291
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  #43  
Old 12-30-2016, 11:11 PM
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Default Re: Birch drums

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Originally Posted by Wave Deckel View Post
I guess, you are comparing two types of drumsets that cannot be compared in this case. The Renown has a 30°bearing edge, which dominates its sound way way more than the maple wood, giving it warmth, some kind of mellow tone, while birch sets usually sport a 45° bearing edge, that will automatically give you way more attack and punch once you hit the drums.
This is a bit mis-leading. I the interior cut (30/45/60 degree) has almost no relevance on the drums sound, especially as you get in to thinner and thinner shells. On a kit with thick re-rings (think vintage kits) the added mass of the re-ring and how much of that mass is removed with the inner cut will make a mildly noticeable difference. However, on a modern kit with something like a 5-6mm thick shell and no re-rings, you will never be able to hear any difference between a 30/45/60 degree inner cut.

Where you will notice a difference in sound is in the outer cut and how the apex of the edge is designed. More head to shell contact will add warmth, increase shell tone, diminish attack, decrease overtones and reduce head sustain. Drums with more head to shell contact tend to sound quieter and have less cut because the higher pitches of the attack and sustain have been absorbed by the mass of the shell.
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  #44  
Old 12-31-2016, 07:09 PM
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Default Re: Birch drums

I have two Birch Kits. A Yamaha recording Custom & a Yamaha Rock Tour Custom. Ok, The Rock Tour Custom is a Birch Hybrid with one layer of Mahogany.
The RC's are just the most beautiful of drums & do exactly as the name suggests - Record perfectly & this is all that I use them for.
The RTC's are a phenomenal kit for playing live. The Mahogany layer along with the resin outer coating make these the loudest drums I have ever heard. They are also very controllable & dead easy to tune. I bought my set second hand for £400. These were pro kits in the 90's & used by Guns & Roses, Cozy Powell etc.
Most definitely a great deal second hand & the perfect kit for Rock/Metal etc :)
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  #45  
Old 06-28-2018, 03:36 AM
harrben harrben is offline
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Default Re: Birch drums

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Originally Posted by drummingman View Post
Those are nice but not completly what I'm looking for sound wise.
I know it's been awhile since this thread was started, and I don't know if you're still looking but I have a set of Premier Genistas from the 1990's. I think the time has finally come for me to do a bit of downsizing. My kit is crowded, and no matter how many times one of those floor tom legs bites one of my toes, I simply cannot successfully pull any of its members away for any sustained period of time. I've got them at my lake house, which is small enough as it is. So, I'm thinking I'll replace them with another acoustic kit that has a smaller footprint.

I love these drums! I've had them for almost 20 years. The reason for my post is to (hopefully) glean from you cats some advice on where I should price them. I've done a little poking around online and, is it just me or, has Premier all but abandoned the drumset business (especially the high-end lines) for orchestral and marching band stuff? Apparently, no more Signia line, but it looks like they're now offering the Genistas in maple!?! Furthermore, my memory is not what it used to be, but their price tag seemed to be a good bit lower than what I recall shelling out!

Anyway, enough fiddling around, here's what I've got:
22 x 18
10 x 12 rack tom w/ RIMS
12 x 14 rack tom w/ RIMS
16 x 16 floor tom
16 x 18 floor tom
14 x 7 snare (thunderous!)

Now, no matter how many pains I've taken over the years to keep these things from getting beaten up, they are far from pristine. The bass drum has borne the brunt--its top (from the bottom of the rack toms) and its wooden hoops. Also, the bass drum legs are crap--truthfully, all of Premiere's hardware is crap, in my opinion! With the exception of the post that fits into the bass drum and holds the two ball-jointed, articulating rack tom arms, however, I've still got it all. Those plastic balls are marred and brittle, and using a pair of channel locks is necessary to get it tight enough so that the vibrations from playing doesn't cause the arms to droop, but it's here. I'm not using it; I'm using hardware manufactured by others. Most of that, however, belongs to my brother. But, my bass drum is supported by a little structure that I made years ago. As a general contractor, it's often easier for me just to design and build exactly what I want instead of wasting hours trying to figure out if someone else makes it, what it's called, and where I can find it. The bass drum is cradled from underneath by a concave piece I cut from a sheet of 2-inch thick foam (extruded polystyrene), to promote resonance. Plus, it's lifted off the ground so that the bass drum beater lands in the center of the batter head (I have since realized that those "lifts" have grown in popularity), but it's also angled slightly upwards (resonant end higher than batter) which provides a mechanical advantage to my liking. One thing that my much-loved contraption lacks, I think it's safe to say, is aesthetic appeal. So, I guess it's a good thing that Premier still offers bass drum legs for its Genistas...at least, that was still the case when I checked their website last night.

I can provide any more explanation, clarification, or photos, just let me know. Thanks!
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  #46  
Old 07-10-2018, 03:02 PM
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Ben Tama Ben Tama is offline
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Default Re: Birch drums

Birch is my favourite shell material, I wish there were more choices for it as I'm having a hard time finding the right snare.

Does anyone know where I can find a 14" x 4" or a 13" x 5" 100% birch snare? No re-rings, no laminate, quality birch like Scandinavian?
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  #47  
Old 07-10-2018, 03:18 PM
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Default Re: Birch drums

Sonor makes several. Google "sonor birch snare" then click on "shopping"
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  #48  
Old 07-10-2018, 03:24 PM
harrben harrben is offline
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Default Re: Birch drums

Birch snares are the bomb. Mine is tight and snappy...but loud.
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  #49  
Old 07-10-2018, 03:25 PM
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Default Re: Birch drums

Wildly unpopular choice, but if you can try a Premier Artist Birch.

Beautiful drums, sound amazing, dirt cheap.

I'm UK based, that may be why prices are so low...
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