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  #1  
Old 11-06-2010, 11:40 PM
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Funky CrÍpe Funky CrÍpe is offline
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Default Recording session

I was recording today, and when we listened back there was a bit to change. They said they'll " drop me in " on the part and have me play it again. I never knew that you could do all parts seperatly. Is this done much? Ever do it, takes off a load of pressure when recording
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Old 11-06-2010, 11:57 PM
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Lucho Lucho is offline
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Default Re: Recording session

My experiences with recording have been doing 3 good takes usually, and then the drums are edited afterwards. usually there's one or two little bits that are slightly off and we'll take them from the other takes.
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Old 11-07-2010, 12:04 AM
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Default Re: Recording session

Most pop and rock recordings using real players has the musicians in seperate booths so "stuff" can be tweaked if need be down the road. Even some acoustic jazz settings i've done in the past have had me in a studio isolation drum booth for some recordings. This helped greatly with instrument seperation with one group in particular for a CD which had a horn section playing some very difficult unison ensemble parts and solo backgrounds which due to complete seperation had a few shorts at totally nailng down at a later date. The final product turned out great and only those who "knew" really knew what had to be done for best results using the magic of the rec. studio.

Most stuff I do now has the musicians all in the same room. You may see the odd seperation baffle but that's it in this setting for acoustic jazz music for reference. This presents many challenges both to the players and the rec. engineer. Lots of mic leekage can happen mostly from the drums getting into the other instruments recorded tracks at the session leaving NO option for redoing any seperate tracks down the road for all involved. Most of the classic pivotal jazz recordings many of us dig from the 50's and 60's were done this way. Just like a live concert warts and all with a smaller room to tweak what is documented on the engineers end later in mixing and mastering to the final product.
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Last edited by Steamer; 11-07-2010 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 11-07-2010, 12:26 AM
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Default Re: Recording session

Not since tracking to actual tape have I "dropped in", or "punched in" on a recording.

It used to be more common as the amount of tape you had was finite as opposed to seemingly unlimited hard disk space. I usually work similar to Lucho where I'll put down 3 takes I feel are up to snuff and edit as needed from the 3 takes. It isn't nearly as easy to do this type of editing with tape, hence re-recording a small section was favoured over doing another full take.

Full takes just generally feel and flow better than recording in sections and I kinda fail to see the need to break it up when tracking digitally.

Somehow this doesn't seem to apply to any other instrument but drums.
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Old 11-07-2010, 08:00 AM
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Default Re: Recording session

I've punched-in with some sessions before. It's easy to do as long as you are playing with a scratch track and not live musicians. Just go back a few bars before the part you need to punch-in and start playing over-top of what you already tracked, once you hear the drum track you already recorded drop out, just keep playing and finish the song.

A lot of guys will like to do full take after full take, but if you can do a punch-in it's a lot faster.
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:35 AM
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Default Re: Recording session

Quote:
Originally Posted by jer View Post
Full takes just generally feel and flow better than recording in sections and I kinda fail to see the need to break it up when tracking digitally.
And that's the issue with drop in's. Not just continuity of vibe & timing, but kit crosstalk some distance back in the recording can be an issue. In the good/bad old days of tape, the "flying edit" was king. A one shot deal, as you couldn't keep opening the envelope. Ah, the days of chinagraph pencils!
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Old 11-07-2010, 05:33 PM
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Default Re: Recording session

I could tell on one track the guys just wanted me to be dropped in after 2 takes, but i wanted to do one more full one. It does seem like a much faster way of doing things, but i guess it does depend on the music. There was feel in the music, but not that much for the drums
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Old 11-07-2010, 06:07 PM
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Default Re: Recording session

Quote:
Originally Posted by Funky CrÍpe View Post
I could tell on one track the guys just wanted me to be dropped in after 2 takes, but i wanted to do one more full one. It does seem like a much faster way of doing things, but i guess it does depend on the music. There was feel in the music, but not that much for the drums
Well the feel in the drums is entirely up to you.

I find it helps to sort of "visualize" what you want the track to sound like in your head. Hear the music first before you count off for a new take and then summon all of your energy into putting the best take possible.

When you do two or 3 takes of a song if you don't do this (at least for me) it's really noticeable the difference in energy levels in the takes.

It takes hard concentration to keep the energy level up in your takes one after the other, as well as keeping groove and feel that you want.
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Old 11-07-2010, 06:09 PM
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Default Re: Recording session

It's quite common, and the ability to punch in & out more accurately in ProTools makes it a desirable option to doing a re-take if there are a few wonky parts. Laying down 2 or 3 complete takes is all well and good, but making decisions about 'comping' them takes time and decision-making while on the clock. Better to have one take that's been fixed to the drummer/producer's satisfaction up front, than to grapple with 3 full takes and agonize over the best parts from each.

Conversely, comping is commonly done with vocals, in part because punches on vocal tracks may be more obvious. But with multiple tracks to select from, decisions on timing and inflection can be made more carefully, and blending separate takes is easy and convincing with crossfading. Singers will usually just record 4 or 5 or 6 complete lead vocal takes, and sort it out during the mix.

The reason more care is given to vocals is that they're typically more prominent in most recordings, and therefore subject to more scrutiny by the listener.

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