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  #1  
Old 10-11-2016, 05:22 PM
DrummerCA35 DrummerCA35 is offline
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Default Criticism

So our band played a gig with a bass player we'd never played with before. 3 sets of R&B/funk/disco/rock. The audience loved us, people danced, and didn't want us to leave. The sound man complimented me, and the band got a bonus for the gig.

The bass player was an older guy (about 60) good player, went to the Berklee College of Music (a long time ago). He complimented me, and said I "played great", and thanked me for giving him cues, and said that he and I locked in really well. He also said he loved the "sweet sound" of my drums.

When another member talked to him the next day, however, he told the other member that I "lose time when the drums rest for more than a beat or two", and that "I also lose time to a lesser extent on some drum fills." He went on to then say "I was terrific in other ways but that these things would have to be corrected before becoming more involved with the band, beyond filling in occasionally. (Should such an opportunity come up)

I know there are definitely things I could improve upon, learn, and do better. However, I'm generally complimented on my playing, and the sound guy went out of his way to compliment me that night, as did other band members, and the fill-in bass player himself. Over the course of playing drums for most of my life, I've never been told that I lose time. I'm not sure that I would have done anything any different, and that I played at my best that night. Am I now supposed to approach the guy and ask for clarification on what he told the other band member? Maybe he's right...maybe I lose time when I play fills after all these decades of playing and just never knew it. Maybe I could learn something from this accomplished, schooled player.

One other thing is that he's quit multiple bands because he wasn't happy with the musicianship.

Our band has made changes over time; a singer was replaced who wasn't cutting it; there have been musicians who have PLAYED SONGS IN THE WRONG KEY, and made major mistakes. I guess not everyone is always going to like a certain player in each situation.

I am receptive to criticism with people I trust, I try to improve. Have you guys ran into situations where you felt the criticism may not be accurate? How far do you go in being receptive to it?
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Old 10-11-2016, 05:36 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

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Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post
I am receptive to criticism with people I trust, I try to improve. Have you guys ran into situations where you felt the criticism may not be accurate? How far do you go in being receptive to it?
I've learned over time to be more open to criticism. Mainly because I eventually figure out that the people criticizing me are absolutely correct. Your ego is your most powerful enemy when it comes to learning.
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Old 10-11-2016, 05:38 PM
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larryace larryace is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

FWIW, I wouldn't disregard what he said. It's my opinion that he really felt this, no matter the degree. Why would he say it if he didn't feel it? So address what you heard and don't embarrass the guy by exposing him talking behind your back. Just take the critique earnestly, and try to hear what he is referring to. Basically speaking, I feel you have the right attitude. Just treat what you heard like it's the truth (even if it's off) and conscientiously try to improve your time. Can't hurt, right? Then you will have done everything you can with the info you heard. Be proactive with this info. You don't want ANYONE saying this about you, true or not.

IMO, having really top notch meter and a great tempo sense is a high achievement. It's not easy. Out of all the best musicians I know, only a handful have truly great meter/tempo sense, to the point where they don't need a drummer, or anyone else, to keep the time for them. They know time.

And what Kamak said is gold.
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Old 10-11-2016, 05:44 PM
tcspears tcspears is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post
The bass player was an older guy (about 60) good player, went to the Berklee College of Music
There's your answer right there, a Berklee guy!

Just kidding, I went to NEC, and our jazz programs are always in competition.


I think the more educated someone is, the higher their standards will be... it can also make them a bitter perfectionist.

It's hard to say what happened based on your story... it might even be a little of both!


I find that many people that went to school for music end up being very absolutist, and need everything to be perfect (in fairness it is beat into us for at least 4 years). Which is great for his shows, but as the guest he should really just listen for the first couple of gigs, and then assess if there's actually a problem. Then he could come to you and say: "I'm getting lost when you play that fill, are you coming back in on the one?"

Live music, after all, isn't perfect. Especially when the players don't work together all the time. You might feel a line different than he does. You might bend time differently than he bends time, or he might not hear your thought process...
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  #5  
Old 10-11-2016, 05:51 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

I make it a point to ask for additional feedback whenever I've received criticism. There's usually a kernel of truth in there. The path to becoming a better player and whatnot.

Of course, not everyone is qualified to critique. Even otherwise good musicians can get weird ideas about things.

A bass player in a jazz band I played with many years ago once stopped a rehearsal to complain about how I played time. He told me that every drummer he played with played jazz on the ride cymbal with loud, steady quarter notes on the bell. I thought he was joking, but he was serious. I was diplomatic and the bandleader later fired the guy because he just wasn't working out. But you have to know when to take someone's critique with a grain of salt.
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  #6  
Old 10-11-2016, 06:35 PM
toddbishop toddbishop is online now
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Default Re: Criticism

First, most people's compliments are virtually meaningless in relation to your actual musicianship. It's great if people enjoy the show, because that's why there are gigs, but that doesn't actually tell you how good a drummer you are, or if better musicians are going to want to play with you. And musicians saying nice things to you doesn't necessarily mean they don't have any problems with your playing, too.

You have to judge for yourself if it's worth worrying about what he said, but I would be taking it seriously anytime a good player says something about my playing. Losing time to the extent that somebody good doesn't want to play with you is kind of a big deal. You should kind of always be working on improving your time anyway, IMO-- like your entire career.

But 8mile and tc are right, too-- sometimes people shockingly don't know wtf they're talking about, or are way more perfectionist than is reasonable at times. The fact that this guy can't find anyone to play with suggests the latter-- which doesn't mean he's wrong.

re your last question about listening to criticism: Notes from the person paying you, you always take seriously and do what you must to make them happy-- even if they're wrong. Comments from expert players who just don't GAF and say what's on their mind, you also take seriously, but not so seriously you let it damage your ego permanently. Complaints from mediocre players who don't want you playing better than them, or differently than they're used to, you ignore.
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  #7  
Old 10-11-2016, 07:16 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

Record your next gig, listen critically and evaluate.
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  #8  
Old 10-11-2016, 07:30 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

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Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
Record your next gig, listen critically and evaluate.
YES! Do exactly this.

Also, have a drummer that you trust come to your live performance and have him or her listen to you play. Have them give you an honest critique of your playing.

.
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  #9  
Old 10-11-2016, 07:58 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Have the rest of the band ever mentioned problems with you keeping time?

Do you think, before this guy mentioned it, that you have a timing issue?

How well do you and the rest of the band know this guy?

Why would he tell you one thing, then pass on negative things about you to the rest, behind your back. Why not just say how much he enjoyed playing with you but that you may need to tighten up a little, in his opinion.

The fact he has left lots of bands should sound a warning. Was it because he thought the others were not good enough, or were there other reasons? You could try contacting one of the bands he left, just for a bit of feedback.

If you know the sound man and the rest of the band well, and they have no issues with your playing, I would be more inclined to go with there opinion rather than someone I hardly know. Unless, as I say, you know you have timing issues.
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Old 10-11-2016, 08:16 PM
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bermuda bermuda is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by tcspears View Post
I think the more educated someone is, the higher their standards will be... it can also make them a bitter perfectionist.
More accurate to say "a bitter musician in search of perfection." Meaning, they're probably never satisfied. Also, don't assume that because someone went to Berklee, their time is necessarily great.

Criticism is good, but only if the source is credible. Don't instantly place someone on a high pedestal because they took expensive lessons.

Bermuda
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Old 10-11-2016, 08:21 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

To make any progress, ignore compliments, listen to criticism.

20 years ago somebody wrote a review (work performance) of me within my profession, and described me as in the 'lower 50%" of all people who do what I do for a living. It fuelled me immensely to improve and be better. Now I'm the best (ok just kidding about 'best', lol)
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Old 10-11-2016, 08:28 PM
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IDDrummer IDDrummer is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by toddbishop View Post
First, most people's compliments are virtually meaningless in relation to your actual musicianship.
This! A compliment generally just means someone had fun. or that they enjoyed an aspect of your performance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
Record your next gig, listen critically and evaluate.
This is truly the only way you'll know for sure. If you could get the bass player to listen with you and point out the areas he noticed, all the better.

His criticism mostly means that there were spots where you two didn't match up. Until you listen back, you won't know for sure what really went on.
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  #13  
Old 10-11-2016, 08:42 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

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Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
More accurate to say "a bitter musician in search of perfection." Meaning, they're probably never satisfied. Also, don't assume that because someone went to Berklee, their time is necessarily great.

Criticism is good, but only if the source is credible. Don't instantly place someone on a high pedestal because they took expensive lessons.

Bermuda

/\This.

His comments, to other people, were only his opinion.
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  #14  
Old 10-11-2016, 09:24 PM
New Tricks New Tricks is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

When I was younger, I did not take any form of criticism well. In retrospect, I was WAY off base. I was not nearly good or experienced enough to get angry.


The bass player probably complimented you that night because he was being polite and tactful. He thanked you and pointed out some good things.

His discussion with the other member was more frank and he simply expressed what he would like to see if he were to continue to play with the band.

Remember, these things don't seriously affect the way the general public hears the music. They are taking in the whole drinking, dancing, having a good time scene.

The musicians are more likely to be listening 100% to the music and the bass player and drummer are probably listening to each other more than the other members.


Over the past few years, I have observed that most drummers have some timing issues. I've spent a lot of time playing with a click and it made it made me realize how easy it is to drift, especially during fills. The more I play and record, the more tuned in my ear and brain get.

My advice is to always listen to and analyze criticism. If it is coming from someone who may have a valid point, take steps to make corrections and learn from it. If it's coming from some random clown, just smile, say thanks and disregard it.
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Old 10-11-2016, 09:37 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

Get a metronome and find out if he is right.
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  #16  
Old 10-11-2016, 09:49 PM
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I had never improved more than when I listened carefully to my bass player criticism !
To be honest, he did it with tact and helped to improve on some defaults I used to have (time rightness) and, with just a little work, and a better ear and concentration, I improved fast - a matter of week. Funny enough, he also gave me an advice on my breathing, told me that I sometimes don't breath enough and then, get tired. I changed that and now take deep breath when the rhythm tends to be tiring and it went much better during long concerts.
Morality : listen to the good bass player who has more experience than you.
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  #17  
Old 10-12-2016, 12:59 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Gotta be careful with both criticisms and compliments.

I've heard various aspects my playing criticized by some, while others have complimented those very same things as the aspects they like the most. Whaddaya gonna do?

And it comes from almost every metric: too rigid vs. not rigid enough, too loud vs. not loud enough, too busy vs not busy enough ...

It just depends on who's saying it and where they're coming from. Sometimes it's as simple as some cats just like to comment on others' playing habits/preferences as a way to reconcile any discrepancies with how they're used to hearing things.

But not always, so your default position should always be to hear them out and seriously consider any merits separate from the person saying it. Be wary of both glowing praise and harsh criticisms.

I know what kind of player I'm trying to be, so any feedback I get ultimately gets compared to that ideal. Am I getting it right? Wrong? Am I even close? Whatever the case, it might not necessarily align with the ideals expressed by the one making the comment.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:37 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Many years ago I tried out for a local church band. During the very first night of audition/practice, one member of the group would yell out at me in the middle of the song…"You're dragging! You're dragging!" Almost every song we played she would say this at some point. I thought I was right on the beat. I had no recording to listen to. I just thought this person was being too critical.

To make a long story short…she was absolutely right. I didn't realize that I had a tendency to slow down in at least one part of every song. I learned this bitter truth later when I listened back to recordings that I thought I nailed. This criticism absolutely helped me get more steady playing through a whole song.

What I realized was that at times my mind would drift and I would kind of day dream and my limbs would go on auto-pilot. So my real problem was losing concentration on the music and I would unknowingly slow up at times. Once I became aware of this shortcoming, it helped me to improve myself. I'm never perfect. But now I catch myself as soon as I start to drift and I hardly cringe now when I hear a recording of myself like I used to.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:48 AM
Brian Brian is offline
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Originally Posted by Ruok View Post
Many years ago I tried out for a local church band. During the very first night of audition/practice, one member of the group would yell out at me in the middle of the song…"You're dragging! You're dragging!" Almost every song we played she would say this at some point. I thought I was right on the beat. I had no recording to listen to. I just thought this person was being too critical.

To make a long story short…she was absolutely right. I didn't realize that I had a tendency to slow down in at least one part of every song. I learned this bitter truth later when I listened back to recordings that I thought I nailed. This criticism absolutely helped me get more steady playing through a whole song.

What I realized was that at times my mind would drift and I would kind of day dream and my limbs would go on auto-pilot. So my real problem was losing concentration on the music and I would unknowingly slow up at times. Once I became aware of this shortcoming, it helped me to improve myself. I'm never perfect. But now I catch myself as soon as I start to drift and I hardly cringe now when I hear a recording of myself like I used to.
One time I was at a bands rehearsal space and a well known musician and instructor walked in. The guitar player had an impromptu lesson, unknown to me. This person happened to hear a few demos the guitarist and I had going on. The only comment to me was "I heard your demo, it sounds like you like to play on top of the beat." It spoke volumes without being critical.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:53 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Before you get upset over it.. (i am more bothered that he complimented you then talked to the band about issues).. I would ask your other bandmates if they have noticed those issues with your playing. If not then it's probably a person that needs to complain about something all the time. If so then i would take it as something to fix :)
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  #21  
Old 10-12-2016, 02:34 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Yes this has happened to me. Similar to Ruok's experience, I was sitting-in with a band on a multi-night event. The bass player found the need to provide real-time critiques of my playing, during warm-ups, live, and between songs - in the form of comment, facial expression and some animation. I was not a fan at the time, but I listened because I was new to this group. It turns out he was right on the money. I had slowed during some fills and drifted a bit... I thought about the criticism and manner in which it was delivered, and when I got over it, I locked-in with he and the band on subsequent nights and had a blast, thanking him many months later.

My suggestion is to listen to the criticism, keep working on things, but don't over think or let it negatively affect your confidence.
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Last edited by Thunder 42; 10-12-2016 at 02:45 AM.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:55 AM
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I would suggest you record a gig or two and listen carefully to your playing. You may also wants to set up a click to the starting tempo and listen to your playing wit the click. Concentrate especially on your time coming into and out of fills. Many drummer rush fills .

Music should ebb and flow especially live but not too excess.
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:10 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
Record your next gig, listen critically and evaluate.
Yes, you should have a recording so you can see if there's something to what he was saying. And as painful as it can be to hear (and perhaps difficult to deliver), I've always appreciated people sharing these kinds of observations with me directly, not through someone else.
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:48 AM
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Vintage Old School Vintage Old School is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

A wise mentor pointed out to me that no matter the content or the source of the criticism, there is almost always a kernel of truth in what others say.

Look for that kernel and take it to heart. Prove to others that you are teachable.

There's a difference between being critiqued and criticized. Invite those you trust around you to critique you knowing it will lead to your betterment.
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Old 10-12-2016, 04:08 AM
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DAMN .....there is a LOT of wisdom in this thread.
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Old 10-12-2016, 04:13 AM
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Recordings are humbling. Nothing to hide, nowhere to go.

I discovered something weird on one of our recent recordings. My five stroke rolls on hihat for an intro started and ended on time but the diddles were not evenly spaced. So it sounded as I was dragging but I was landing on time.

And when listening back repeatedly to that track while counting and after three minutes someone says interrogatively "yeah, no, he's on time..." well you feel like an arse.

So I got two things out of the process on this particular occasion : you can make a five stroke drag if the song calls for it while keeping it "in time". Most importantly, when it's done involuntarily well then my humble self has got a bigger roll problem in need if fixing.
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Old 10-12-2016, 05:20 AM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

It would've been nicer if he'd asked you first if you wanted advice, but the content is probably truthful. Speeding up, or slowing down, during fills and breaks is probably the most common error among drummers. If someone with experience is saying this, go ahead and accept it as true.

The mature -- no, saintly -- thing to do is call up the person, explain how you heard the comments, and sincerely thank them. An occasional ass-kicking turns good players into great ones.
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Old 10-12-2016, 05:22 AM
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Default Re: Criticism

Stabbing you in the back to your bandmates while complimenting you to your face was a dick move, no matter what everyone else on this thread says.
Classic passive-aggressive BS.
If he doesn't have the onions to talk to you directly then he is morally and factually suspect.
By all means examine your playing, as suggested. But look out for someone who thinks he can get you replaced with his drummer buddy, who needs a gig, by badmouthing you to your band.
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Old 10-12-2016, 06:08 AM
New Tricks New Tricks is offline
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Stabbing you in the back to your bandmates while complimenting you to your face was a dick move, no matter what everyone else on this thread says.
lol

Read that ^ and tell me what kind of behavior that is lol.

"no matter what everyone else on this thread says"....nice :)

Well, I guess the discussion is over.

Did I mention.... lol?



Why are the words drama queen coming to mind?
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Old 10-12-2016, 06:35 AM
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larryace larryace is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruok View Post

What I realized was that at times my mind would drift and I would kind of day dream and my limbs would go on auto-pilot. So my real problem was losing concentration on the music and I would unknowingly slow up at times.
This is my exact experience as well. Like you, my time drifted because of the slipping of my own mental focus. So my time is basically as good as my focus. When my focus drifted, so did my time. Now I have learned to stay on point from front to back. It wasn't that hard to correct, once the problem was identified. It was kind of a relief in a way knowing that my time is steady as long as I mentally stay on point.
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Old 10-12-2016, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by New Tricks View Post
lol

Read that ^ and tell me what kind of behavior that is lol.

"no matter what everyone else on this thread says"....nice :)

Well, I guess the discussion is over.

Did I mention.... lol?



Why are the words drama queen coming to mind?
Well, not exactly. There are a few on here that dont buy into the "Well he is older than you and he went to an expensive college so ergo he is always right" People can have agendas. Who is to say the bass player in question is blessed with perfect time?

As Bermuda and a few others have said, If the OP or his other band mates are/were aware he had a timing issue before, then fine, get the metronome out and do some work. But to state that if anyone is critical of any aspect of your playing then it must be true, is the road to madness.
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Old 10-12-2016, 10:56 AM
Push pull stroke Push pull stroke is offline
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I say this as someone with a percussion degree and pretty good time--listen to a recording of your playing, and have a metronome going at the same time.
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Old 10-12-2016, 11:12 AM
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"So our band played a gig with a bass player we'd never played with before. 3 sets of R&B/funk/disco/rock. The audience loved us, people danced, and didn't want us to leave. The sound man complimented me, and the band got a bonus for the gig." (Quote)

So you had a great gig, everyone enjoyed it, and you the band and the audience had a good time and felt great. Apart from one guy who you hardly know. Why beat yourself up over one comment and spoil what you were paid to do, entertain people and enjoy yourself.

Now I dont have a degree in anything so you will have to take my advice with a large pinch of salt, but I thought the whole point of music was to entertain others and enjoy yourself at the same time. If you do then you have nailed it.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:49 PM
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Default Re: Criticism

I think it would be great to hear some criticism. I get a little from the band leader because he's a drummer too. Most of the time people compliment me to be nice. It's ok, but really it's a bunch of smoke being blown up the backside.
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  #35  
Old 10-12-2016, 03:17 PM
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uniongoon uniongoon is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

The longer we play, hopefully the stronger your sense of time becomes. But people need to drop their ego and listen honestly. I find it is best to record yourself live as often as you can. It is often difficult to find time to listen back, while paying attention too, but as we grow our sense of time, your ability to hear minor rushes and retards should develop. Mine is pretty developed, yet often I hear a micro pause in a playback and for the life of me it sounded fine when I played it.
Visual distractions and others playing I guess can distract you from the moment and while hearing or seeing something else, a little bump goes by on your own end.
This being said, it is possible the new bass player had a different ebb and flow and it conflicted a little with your natural feel. This could be neither of your fault but maybe shows the bass guy is pretty tuned into that concept, yet if he thinks he is totally right 100% of the time, his first reaction would be to blame someone else.
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  #36  
Old 10-12-2016, 05:53 PM
DrummerCA35 DrummerCA35 is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Hi Guys,

I am of course the OP. Thanks for all the responses. I really appreciate it.

As for recording a gig and and then listening, do you have a recommend way to do this? Just use an iphone? Or buy some kind of recorder that sounds better? I am going to record a gig. But it's not going to be just the drums that are painful to hear. The vocals will be painful, listening to the mistakes the other guys are making, and the rawness of these kinds of recordings are hard to listen to. But I will. Have any of you guys invested in something like this: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/deta...FQ-Zfgod6g0HDQ

After pondering all of this, I made the decision to ask the guy directly to elaborate. (I know that it’s been posted that this would let him know that I found out he was talking behind my back. However, given that he said these things would need to be fixed, he knew it would get to me anyway.) If he responds, I will listen to him and go from there.

I reached out to him, all the while considering the other posts that expressed their concerns about this guy. All in all, I want to see if there is a kernel of truth in what he said, but I wont' know unless I hear more elaboration.

Based on a lot of the comments, I agree that a comment from a dancer at the bar, for example, is very different from another musician that you are playing music with.

Mikel, in answer to your questions: NO the rest of the band has never mentioned problems with me keeping time. Nor have I ever heard this from all of the people I’ve played drums for. No, before this guy mentioned it, I never thought I had a timing issue. How well do I and the rest of the band know this guy? He’s friends with the guitar player, the rest of the band doesn’t know him.

About getting a metronome, I have played to tracks and rhythms or cowbells, etc on my electronic drums and there is no timing issue when playing fills. But I will try it again and pay close attention.

One comment was “ it is possible the bass player had a different ebb and flow and it conflicted a little with your natural feel.” This makes a lot of sense to me, and while I am open to listening to what he says, I feel this different ebb and flow is a possibility.

I also want to say that I've watched videos of this guy, and some are of him soloing, and he's likely one of the best bass players in the county.

Anyway, thanks again to everyone who took the time to respond. I appreciate you guys and this forum.
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  #37  
Old 10-12-2016, 06:49 PM
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PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post

As for recording a gig and and then listening, do you have a recommend way to do this? Just use an iphone? Or buy some kind of recorder that sounds better?
I bought a Tascam field recorder a while back, and I love it. I record performances and practices a lot. It's really helpful.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post
I am going to record a gig. But it's not going to be just the drums that are painful to hear. The vocals will be painful, listening to the mistakes the other guys are making, and the rawness of these kinds of recordings are hard to listen to. But I will.
If you are concerned about how "painful" it will be to listen to, then maybe there's something to what the bass player is saying. Listening to playback can be very eye-opening, and it's necessary if you want to get better. It may help for everyone to listen to it as well.
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  #38  
Old 10-12-2016, 06:52 PM
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IDDrummer IDDrummer is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post
Hi Guys,

I am of course the OP. Thanks for all the responses. I really appreciate it.

As for recording a gig and and then listening, do you have a recommend way to do this? Just use an iphone? Or buy some kind of recorder that sounds better? I am going to record a gig. But it's not going to be just the drums that are painful to hear. The vocals will be painful, listening to the mistakes the other guys are making, and the rawness of these kinds of recordings are hard to listen to. But I will. Have any of you guys invested in something like this: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/deta...FQ-Zfgod6g0HDQ

After pondering all of this, I made the decision to ask the guy directly to elaborate. (I know that it’s been posted that this would let him know that I found out he was talking behind my back. However, given that he said these things would need to be fixed, he knew it would get to me anyway.) If he responds, I will listen to him and go from there.

I reached out to him, all the while considering the other posts that expressed their concerns about this guy. All in all, I want to see if there is a kernel of truth in what he said, but I wont' know unless I hear more elaboration.

Based on a lot of the comments, I agree that a comment from a dancer at the bar, for example, is very different from another musician that you are playing music with.

Mikel, in answer to your questions: NO the rest of the band has never mentioned problems with me keeping time. Nor have I ever heard this from all of the people I’ve played drums for. No, before this guy mentioned it, I never thought I had a timing issue. How well do I and the rest of the band know this guy? He’s friends with the guitar player, the rest of the band doesn’t know him.

About getting a metronome, I have played to tracks and rhythms or cowbells, etc on my electronic drums and there is no timing issue when playing fills. But I will try it again and pay close attention.

One comment was “ it is possible the bass player had a different ebb and flow and it conflicted a little with your natural feel.” This makes a lot of sense to me, and while I am open to listening to what he says, I feel this different ebb and flow is a possibility.

I also want to say that I've watched videos of this guy, and some are of him soloing, and he's likely one of the best bass players in the county.

Anyway, thanks again to everyone who took the time to respond. I appreciate you guys and this forum.
I don't have good advice about recording, because I've either used a full interface and laptop or just my phone. But there are lots of good portable recorders out these days.

One note about playing with a metronome - you can stay with a metronome and still have big fluctuations, especially regarding the feel of how fills fit with the pulse. This MAY be what the bass player is noticing, especially if it is different from his natural feel.

You'll figure it out. I'm interested in how the bass player responds to your inquiry. If he is really that good, and you can develop a rapport with him, that'll be a big boon!

Good luck.
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  #39  
Old 10-12-2016, 07:10 PM
DrummerCA35 DrummerCA35 is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
I bought a Tascam field recorder a while back, and I love it. I record performances and practices a lot. It's really helpful.




If you are concerned about how "painful" it will be to listen to, then maybe there's something to what the bass player is saying. Listening to playback can be very eye-opening, and it's necessary if you want to get better. It may help for everyone to listen to it as well.
Thanks for the tip. By "painful" I meant that listening to raw iphone recordings of drums often sounds like crap to me, as opposed to a sound board or studio recording.
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  #40  
Old 10-12-2016, 07:21 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerCA35 View Post
I am going to record a gig. But it's not going to be just the drums that are painful to hear. The vocals will be painful, listening to the mistakes the other guys are making, and the rawness of these kinds of recordings are hard to listen to. But I will.

If the vocalist and the rest of the band are all making mistakes that are obvious to you, why would "One of the best bassists in the County" want to play with the band? I would seriously give this guy some thought before you beat yourself up.
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