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  #121  
Old 09-03-2005, 06:05 PM
mediocrefunkybeat
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

My personal preferences lean towards a medium-sized kit, say a 7 piece. Anything bigger and I'd be lost! However, an example of one who uses and utilises a large kit is Neil Peart, he has used every single bit of his kit at some point of his career in Rush. In the 'Burning for Buddy' sessions, he used nothing larger than a 4 or 5 piece kit, but he used it all to its full potential.

There is such a thing as overkill, but only when half the kit is for show... but as entertainers there could be a level of spectacle built in too I suppose. So a large kit could be considered good as a bit of crowd pleaser in some situations.
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  #122  
Old 09-03-2005, 07:24 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I respect drummers like neil peart and mike portnoy and carter beuford with their big kits; they are amazing, dont get me wrong, but i think that another way one can show skill is by making magic happen with a very small kit, like a four or five piece kit and a few cymbals. Well, I would prefer a Peart sized kit to a four piece, but I still think think a drummer that can make magic on a small kit can make magic on any kit.
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  #123  
Old 09-03-2005, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

There was a band out of NYC called "Second Step" 10-15 years ago and fortunately they made it to RI on occasion. They had a drummer out of Baltimore. They were a R&B/Funk group with sax, bone, trumpet, bass, guitar, drums and lead singer. Energy out the caboose. The drummer's set up - bass, snare, three cymbals and hi-hat. He had such skill and taste as a player that you never noticed the fact that was all he had for equipment. It's not the amount of drums, it's how you use them.

Come to think of it, I think he was a student of Gary Chaffee for a time - or that may have been their second drummer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davodi74
I respect drummers like neil peart and mike portnoy and carter beuford with their big kits; they are amazing, dont get me wrong, but i think that another way one can show skill is by making magic happen with a very small kit, like a four or five piece kit and a few cymbals. Well, I would prefer a Peart sized kit to a four piece, but I still think think a drummer that can make magic on a small kit can make magic on any kit.
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  #124  
Old 09-03-2005, 11:36 PM
THE ANIMAL
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I really think it depends on the individual's preference,ability and style of music that he is required to play.
Another factor is the venue and the interaction with other musicians.
My main gigging and recording kit at the moment, { for classic rock & blues }, is s follows:

8" 10" 12" 14" 16" toms, snare and 22" bass drum.

15" Hatts, 20" rock & 20" ping ride, 2 x 16" crash, 17" crash, 18" crash, 6" & 10" splash, 18" china and 20" china.

I've just come out of the studio today and the kit has recorded great, i particularly like the sound of the run down on the toms that you just couldn't achieve using only a couple of drums.
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  #125  
Old 09-04-2005, 01:07 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

now i ahve a four peice kit. 2 toms. snare and kick. i only ahve 2 crashes and a ride.i do use doubel kick too. i hhave alwasy been comfortable playing on a small kit. the 4 perice works great. but recetly i ahve been considerign adding a 10 inch and 14 inch tom to my set for a more variety of soudsn for filsl and grooves. i am playing alto mor emetal now too and it makes sense to get more toms so i can do longer fils wihtout going back and forth on the 2 toms. i am also consifering addign more cymbals.
personally i think kit size has alot to do with waht type of music you play. in msot pop muisic when ppl are playing the rock beat 90% of the time there is nto poitn ot have 20 crahes adn 10 toms. but in metal and prog music you need alot mroe soudn sources to give moe variety to the parts.
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  #126  
Old 09-04-2005, 02:27 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I have three kits that are all four pieces. I like the abillity to pack it up and go places easily. So what if I can't do huge cascading single stroke rolls down the kit? That's not my style- I like what I have for what I do.
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  #127  
Old 09-04-2005, 04:35 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

Well I like both. I'm going to try like a seven or eight soon to see how I like it. But when I play on larger sets I feel more powerfull. I can't really explain it but it feels good. Not like the ones that take a full sized mobile home to store it in. Though I would be lost but i can adapt quickly. I have a 5 right now.
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  #128  
Old 09-04-2005, 05:06 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

OK so there's no answer beyond personal preference ...

I myself am planning a drumset collection of a number of different types and sizes of kits, small 4 piece kits, giant 11 piece kits, ones for hip hop, a two piece vintage jazz kit hehe, and of course my own concoction symmetrical kit ... plus whatever else anyways

it is an undeniable fact of course, that you cannot get the sound of say a 13" china from a sizzle ride, or even a 18" china for that matter. Even if a person can get a dozen sounds from one cymbal or drum, that only means that they can get two dozen sounds from two cymbals or drums. The fact is that there are alot more sound possibilities with a bigger kit.

on the other side of the coin, it is true that alot of the players with the huge kits don't use each individual piece of it as diversely as for example, peter erskine. But that's their fault. When there are people with huge kits that do have the sublties of an erskine or bruford, then there ya go. It's still the drummer that makes the performance, not the drumset. You all say "I'd rather see a drummer kill on a little four piece than see someone bash around on a double bass seven tom kit with no skill." Well of course you would! But when someone plays the giant kit with some virtuosity, it wont matter the size of the kit.
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  #129  
Old 09-04-2005, 10:06 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

Well, I love my 5-piece so far. Can't go wrong with it. But, I wouldn't mind having an extra tom or two, another snare, so I can have both snare sounds at once, without turning it off all the time. Most of all though..I'd like more cymbals. I only have my ride/crash and hi-hats, which is fine. I'd just like to get some more sounds, although I have found I can get a lot of different sounds with my cymbals. Although, I listen to Alice In Chains so much, and Sean Kinney does a lot of different things with his hi-hats, and makes some real cool patterns, and I think he only has a 5 or 4-piece. I dunno'. Small Kit..with lot's of cymbals for me I guess, if I could have it like that.
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  #130  
Old 09-04-2005, 12:46 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

In one of my bands we play much of improvised, progressive an free-jazzy things. But there I have only a little Jazz kit with single bass, two toms, snare and three cymbals. I could really need more there!

On the other hand in that band where we play jazz standards with a vocalist I have my big kit with four toms, double bass two snares and many cymbals and I don't need that much.

So if a kit size makes sense mainly depends on the musical situation. If the drummer can't play the problem is an other one...
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  #131  
Old 09-04-2005, 02:07 PM
oliverlawford oliverlawford is offline
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

Its much more skillful in my opinion to exploit as much as you can as many sounds from limited equipment ie a small kit, rather than a massive kit with lots of different sounds available from lots of different pieces of equipment.

Explore new sounds from the gear you already have rather than buying loads of money on new cymbals and drums...

Oli
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  #132  
Old 09-04-2005, 04:54 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

If I turn up to a gig at which other bands and drummers will be playing, and I see a guy with a huge kit, my immediate reaction is one of relief, being confident that that drummer will probably be a showman with little taste who needs to hide behind a mass of drums to a) fool the audience into thinking he must be good, and b) hide his own insecurities. If I see a drummer with a tiny, crappy, beaten up old kit, then I'll be scared!! There may be no rhyme or reason to it, but I'll assume the drummer with the small kit must be way more confident about what he can pull out of it.

This is not to say big kits don't have their place in the right hands. I saw a Marco Minnemann clinic a while back and I couldn't dream of accusing him of having a big kit to hide his weaknesses, because (obviously) he's got monster chops. He also, at that particular clinic anyway, utilised everything in his set-up for a specific purpose, and created an amazing sonic palette with it.

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  #133  
Old 09-07-2005, 07:33 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I like medium sized kits more on the smaller side like i have 12 ,13,14,and 16 inch toms 22 bass and 13inch snare thats all i use for the drums and for cymbals a have 14 inch hi hats 16 inch crash 18 crash 20 inch ride 18 inch china 8 inch splash and a 21 inch ride(it was free) and double bass thats all i use anymore id probly be lost
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  #134  
Old 09-07-2005, 09:27 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I prefer to own an average size kit at home for my personal use & practice .... I think for now ... my 9pcs kit will do just fine. But for Cymbals ...I'm afraid I might end up having more into my collection ... cause different types of Cymbals are required for playing different kinds of Music...eg. Jazz, Fusion, Rock etc. There is no one universal Cymbal for all types of Music.

Anyway it's so funny ... I have a crazy thought all these while .... That I might buy a Small Traveller Drum Kit (those that can be easily carried around - like the Pearl RhythmTraveller 5pcs Drum Kit but it's make in Taiwan ... very cheap only at S$650.00 app. USD393 only )...It looks so cute, small but not mean't for children .... felt like Basking at Orchard Road in Singapore ...not for $$$$$$ really but just for the fun of it ... .... hehehehe ... but I'm scare, wonder what my friends & subordinate will say behind me when they see me doing that. Well it's feasible !


Last edited by RudimentalDrummer; 09-07-2005 at 09:42 AM.
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  #135  
Old 09-07-2005, 05:15 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

Womble - "If I turn up to a gig at which other bands and drummers will be playing, and I see a guy with a huge kit, my immediate reaction is one of relief, being confident that that drummer will probably be a showman with little taste who needs to hide behind a mass of drums to a) fool the audience into thinking he must be good, and b) hide his own insecurities. If I see a drummer with a tiny, crappy, beaten up old kit, then I'll be scared!! There may be no rhyme or reason to it, but I'll assume the drummer with the small kit must be way more confident about what he can pull out of it."

Rudimentaldrummer - " Anyway it's so funny ... I have a crazy thought all these while .... That I might buy a Small Traveller Drum Kit (those that can be easily carried around - like the Pearl RhythmTraveller 5pcs Drum Kit but it's make in Taiwan ... very cheap only at S$650.00 app. USD393 only )...It looks so cute, small but not mean't for children .... felt like Basking at Orchard Road in Singapore ...not for $$$$$$ really but just for the fun of it ... .... hehehehe ... but I'm scare, wonder what my friends & subordinate will say behind me when they see me doing that. Well it's feasible !"



As players we must separate our egos from our playing ability. As people we must separate ourselves from the good opinion of others. If someone plays a four piece like Bonham or a twelve piece like a beginner, it does not change anything about you or your ability.
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  #136  
Old 09-07-2005, 05:39 PM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

I notice the heavy bias leans on small kits. And there is a lot of anti-big kit rhetoric, and rationalization. (equating larger kits to ego's, penis envy, and so on) What about guys that just like a large kit? They have no specific reason to compensate for anything...they just like lots of drums and cymbals. It's no crime---really! And it obviously intimidates some folks to the point that they try to downplay a big kit's intrinsic or exigent value(s). Some folks act as if big-kit drummers have to justify themselves. They don't.

I go back to square one on this: it's not the kit it's the drummer. And there is NO right or wrong kit.

FWIW: There is no quantification or correlation between kit size and drummer ability at all. Either the drummer is good on what he/she has, or isn't. I have seen plenty of drummers on small, old, beat up kits that did nothing special. Small kits are no more of a qualifier of a great drummer than a large kit.
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  #137  
Old 09-08-2005, 11:56 AM
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Default Re: Big kit or small kit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by '67Rogers

As players we must separate our egos from our playing ability. As people we must separate ourselves from the good opinion of others. If someone plays a four piece like Bonham or a twelve piece like a beginner, it does not change anything about you or your ability.
Yes you're right my bro .... it's really not a matter of how big or small the kit is ... if I'm going to do basking for fun sake - my silly idea. It's that "Basking" is still relatively a very new concept here in my country .... many people thinks ... basking is something similar to begging (like beggers) ... hehehe ... so you understand me now? Cheers ! But I really love to do that on one of a Sunday ...it's sharing my passion with the public...and of course assembling & dissembling a smaller kit is much easier for my purpose .... I'm not bias ... As long as it's DRUMS & PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS, big or small kits - I love them ! If only I had the $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ ... I will have a grand collection of all the Models & Brands.
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  #138  
Old 01-23-2006, 11:06 PM
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Default THE BIG KITS VS SMALL KITS DEBATE

It's very othen been said that small kits force you to be more creative. As always there are persons that confirm this and persons who deny this but i think this makes sence: Small as well as big kits lead to creativity. If you play a small kit, u need the creativity to avoid repeating the same fill, chop, whatever over and over again. But big kits force you to just as much creativity, only in another way. When you play a big kit u better use all your toms/cymbals else they're just a waste of money. So i guess the trick of big kits is to get all your sounds into your grooves and not just use them for making fills nicer.

Do you think it's true that there has been an misunderstanding or not ?

(PS: don't start the whole discussion about big vs small kits again. Just tell me wheter my statement makes sence or not and do you think there has been an understanding or not ? )

Thanks for your time, all comment are welcome.
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  #139  
Old 01-23-2006, 11:29 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

i agree with you. the argument is really invalid because creativity thrives both underconditions of restraint and excess...think of painters. a truly good painter can paint exquisite paintings with only blue whit and black paint but also be just as creative with thousands of colours.

j

ps: i will eventually merge this with the big kits small kits debate but lets see how this baby corners.
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  #140  
Old 01-23-2006, 11:34 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Finally someone solved the puzzle!

now that we all that have arguement cleared up ... good work

and the painting analogy is perfect!
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  #141  
Old 01-23-2006, 11:56 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

I'm not sure the painting analogy entirely addresses it - yes, a master painter can work in both mediums. But for the sake of developing your creativity, surely working with just two colours makes you appreciate the value available in each colour and lets you work on form, concept and control rather than just trying to make use of every colour available?

Once you've developed that control over what you want to create then it doesn't matter how many colours you have in your pallette, but I would suggest that it's still better for development to have constraints before you have excess available to you.

Who's the better songwriter, the guy who has to write a fifteen minute epic using every style and time signature to get his point across, or the guy who can do it with an acoustic guitar, a few simple chords and a voice? I'd argue the latter, not that there's no merit in the former. But in my experience I've seen so many local bands trying to write twenty minute progressive opuses when they actually can't write simple songs well. The result is twenty minute progressive opuses with no conception of taste, shape or musical form. Having good control of the smaller, more constrained form develops better taste and appreciation of what is available when the constraints are removed, IMHO.
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  #142  
Old 01-24-2006, 12:33 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I'm not sure the painting analogy entirely addresses it - yes, a master painter can work in both mediums. But for the sake of developing your creativity, surely working with just two colours makes you appreciate the value available in each colour and lets you work on form, concept and control rather than just trying to make use of every colour available?
There are 3 basic colors - red, blue and yellow + black and white. You can get every other colors from these basic colors.

get the picture?

...5piece drum set... :DD That's probably why they are kinda standart set up ;-)
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  #143  
Old 01-24-2006, 12:43 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jammaster
There are 3 basic colors - red, blue and yellow + black and white. You can get every other colors from these basic colors.

get the picture?
I've got a picture of you, with a point flying past you at great speed :)

The colour issue is a non-issue. My point was that constraints enhance the development of creativity in that they focus control in specific areas. If you have no constraints you have less motivation to gain fine control in any one area.

Constraining yourself to limited numbers of colours removes your attention from having to deal with which particular colour you're using and instead focuses it on form, nuance and articulation.

It's quite a simple principle: You have a finite amount of attention, let's call this a. You have a finite number of things to dedicate that attention to. Let's call that b. Therefore, assuming equal distribution of attention amoung things you work on, the amount of attention paid to each thing is a over b - let's call this c. It obviously doesn't have to be equal, but this is just making a point.

My suggestion is that the more "c" you have - time dedicated to individual things - the more that particular thing will develop. Therefore there are a few ways to improve your control in each field.

1) Increase a, your finite amount of attention you dedicate to the whole.
2) Decrease b, your finite number of things that draw on your attention.

This all seems extremely obvious. If you dedicate time to something you get better at it. Limiting your range of colours will give you a better understanding of all the aspects of your art which don't rely on large numbers of colours - like form, control, nuance and so forth. Once you understand these things better you can introduce a wider range of colours and work on your control and nuance of those colours.

But without the foundation it's arguable that you will develop at a slower rate as an expressive artist, because expression exists independent of your colour palette. If you're a good expressive artist then more colours are just that - more colours. If you're not a good expressive artist then more colours are just a distraction from the things that actually matter.
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  #144  
Old 01-24-2006, 12:43 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I'm not sure the painting analogy entirely addresses it - yes, a master painter can work in both mediums. But for the sake of developing your creativity, surely working with just two colours makes you appreciate the value available in each colour and lets you work on form, concept and control rather than just trying to make use of every colour available?

...Having good control of the smaller, more constrained form develops better taste and appreciation of what is available when the constraints are removed, IMHO.
yes - this is the fundamental purpose of limiting yourself. a true artists understands and appreciates every aspect of his craft. for us, that means understanding the potential of every instrument we use, and mastering the techniques needed to draw out that potential.

there is a reason that we study snare drum alone. i would recommend not just playing on a smaller kit, but taking each different fundamental piece of the drum set (snare, bass, ride, hi hat) and seperating it from your kit. go in a corner and just practice ride patterns, or hi hat technique with the foot and hands. learn to draw all the different sounds out of every drum and cymbal you own.

then, once you've learned how to be artistic on a small scale, you can translate that onto a larger scale.

it's the same reason we have to practice technical exercises slowly - to make sure that every part is right.
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  #145  
Old 01-24-2006, 01:06 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I've got a picture of you, with a point flying past you at great speed :)
O yeah, thats surprising how much can you do with a good fingercontroll :D
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  #146  
Old 01-24-2006, 01:19 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

I know that going from a six-piece with about 10 cymbals, to a four-piece with 4 cymbals, my playing has definitely improved. And so has my creativity. I now pay more attention to the multiple sounds that can come from one cymbal or drum. But this is just a temporary setup, I plan on adding pieces back, one at a time. I miss the additional ways to express myself, but I recognized my tendency to overplay, so this is a corrective measure.

The problem is that I started out with too many drums.
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  #147  
Old 01-24-2006, 11:58 AM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Smaller kit requires you to use stickings and rudiments in more creative ways. If you have a million things to hit, you just hit them. If you have 2 cymbals and a floor tom, you are required to think outside the box to get more sounds out of less stuff.

I personally would just like a bigger kit, but I can appreciate what the less is more crowd is doing (as long as they TRULY are good, and aren't just using less is more as an excuse).
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  #148  
Old 01-24-2006, 12:37 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

One thing that hasn't been mentioned in the small-vs-big debate: Feeling and expressive potential of the two approaches.

I recently wrote a drum part for a performance on a 4pc with two cymbals - a ride and a china. As such, I came up with a whole bunch of ways of playing those drums and cymbals in that part - one section includes the ride played with the tip, the shoulder of the stick and crashed on the edge just as part of the shape of a single two-bar looped groove.

Now I'm revisiting playing the same piece on a 5pc with seven cymbals. If I want I can break those multiple ride sounds onto a ride and two crashes. Do I want to? I've tried both ways, and they sound very different.

The one-cymbal approach has a consistent atmosphere, and changes in dynamic feel smoother and more organic as the wash of the cymbal floats up and down with the grove - it feels more "round" and IMHO a bit more expressive. I reckon that what people tend to perceive as expression in music is more about nuance and variation than it is about big changes - so music like Naked City or Mr Bungle which flits between styles tends to feel maybe more exciting and seat-of-your-pants cool, but less expressive than a piece which retains a constant feel and mood and develops emotional peaks inside that.

The multi-cymbal approach feels a bit more soulless, but has more energy and feels like it has more "space" - it's easier to understand the part, it's more obvious to the listener, and it's easier to hear it over a band. So it makes a lot more sense if your band is loud and you need to project, while it might sound dumb and excessive in a more nuanced context.

Ultimately I think the two approaches do have different uses. The thing is, I don't know if I would have taken the time to develop the control required to actually carry off the one-cymbal approach to that part if I'd had the two crashes sitting there as well, because it took a fair bit of practice. If I hadn't known what the results would be like, would I have bothered working so hard to get three sounds when I had three cymbals sitting right there? I'm not sure.

As it stands I think I'll use both approaches in the song in different repetitions of the same section, but I do stand by the idea that the constraints make you a lot more creative and cause you to have to think up stuff that just otherwise wouldn't occur.
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  #149  
Old 01-24-2006, 12:46 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Even the guys with elaborate cymbal setups generally play on 2 or three of them most of the time anyway. Look at Weckl. Most of his cymbals are just for effects or a different color. Most of the time he's on the evolution ride, the hats and that crash/ride right in front of him.
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  #150  
Old 01-24-2006, 07:29 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Thanks for those who agree me.
But i feel so stupid at the moment. As i only am a 17 years old dutch guy, i really don't understand most of finhiggins's replies. I try too but my english level is still too low, hopefully one day i will look back at this thread and understand it =D.

Therefore i don't indicate you guys should stop debating, seems like serious arguments are involved. Once again i'm amazed in which way Nutha Jason managed to put a resemblance to painting in this one.
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  #151  
Old 01-24-2006, 07:33 PM
Stu_Strib
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

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Originally Posted by DrumProgressive
Ti really don't understand most of finhiggins's replies.
Haha, neither do some of us Americans!
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  #152  
Old 01-24-2006, 07:58 PM
Dano3000 Dano3000 is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumProgressive
As i only am a 17 years old dutch guy, i really don't understand most of finhiggins's replies. I try too but my english level is still too low, hopefully one day i will look back at this thread and understand it =D.

I don't believe age or mastery of the english language have anything to do with it. I'm 41 and have used the english language for the majority of those years and still have problems understanding most of finhiggins's posts.

:)
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  #153  
Old 01-24-2006, 08:05 PM
Dano3000 Dano3000 is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

However you will notice that he used a large amount of words to voice his opinion as opposed to just saying "Yes" or "No"
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  #154  
Old 01-24-2006, 08:35 PM
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finnhiggins finnhiggins is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dano3000
However you will notice that he used a large amount of words to voice his opinion as opposed to just saying "Yes" or "No"
Or indeed "lolz man yuh" :)
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  #155  
Old 01-25-2006, 07:36 AM
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Isaacs Isaacs is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

I've played on both large and small kits. The large one (and yeah, I will have to take a trip back to the garage band days again) was so stupid looking that I cringe every time I pull out the picture of it. In the hands of a master drummer it might (key on the word, might) have been OK but the damn thing had toms reaching around the back of it. I had no business at all throwing that thing together but we are talking about the late 80's early 90's and some of the bands I loved just seemed to use kits that were a mile or three long.

The worst part of it was that with so many toms it was nearly impossible to use them all in a creative fill. I say this because at the time my mentality was, "use it all or it's a waste." That was dopey on my part but hey, I got over it.

Today I am huge fan of much smaller kits. A five piece is perfect for me but I must admit I still have a weakness for cymbals. But, even that is kept in check. I mean, I am not using fifteen cymbals on a five piece kit.

I guess it really just depends on the drummer, the purpose of the kit, and the "show" aspect of it. I have no opinion regarding what other drummers should consider their perfect kit, but I do get irritated when drummers who play on large kits think that those of us on smaller kits are simply not able to play on a massive set. Not able and not willing are two different things.

At the end of the day, to each his or her own. But this post is a good one.

Isaacs
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  #156  
Old 01-25-2006, 09:00 AM
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NUTHA JASON NUTHA JASON is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dano3000
However you will notice that he used a large amount of words to voice his opinion as opposed to just saying "Yes" or "No"


Or indeed "lolz man yuh" :)
hahahaha. finn slays me often. hey man, we often don't agree about stuff but appreciate someone who can put a point across and takes the time to tease out their opinions.

i still believe that neither kit is superior or harder in any way because at the end of the day its a matter of taste and delivery. i had an art teacher that forced us to draw apair of army boots in charcoal with our left hands...it took a few goes and some experimentation but the results were surprising as it made us come up with solutions to limitations and also made us use our weakness and mistakes by hiding them in repeated textures from there on.

j
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  #157  
Old 01-25-2006, 10:42 AM
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burnthehero burnthehero is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

I'm just going to go ahead and clear this whole thing up for everybody once and for all...

KIT SIZE DOES NOT MATTER
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  #158  
Old 01-25-2006, 12:37 PM
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Isaacs
I've played on both large and small kits. The large one (and yeah, I will have to take a trip back to the garage band days again) was so stupid looking that I cringe every time I pull out the picture of it.

Isaacs
HAHA! Who doesn't look back and say "what the hell..."? Actually, I played on a 5 piece Tama during my youth (school's not mine, since I never owned my own until i was 32). When I was older I bought a 5 piece Session kit, then added 2 toms, and about 7 cymbals.

There is a big difference between a big huge 14-year old's 7-piece dream kit, and a 32 year-old's 7 piece kit. Confused? Picture Steve Smith's kit in your head...classy, tight, well laid out, right? That's a pretty big kit, but it is not the power toms angled at ridiculous angles and the cymbals hanging upside down from the rack and all that silliness.
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  #159  
Old 01-31-2006, 09:24 AM
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NUTHA JASON NUTHA JASON is offline
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Default Re: A misunderstanding, or just me ?

i think dom famularo agrees with me....heck he even used the same analogy as me, weeks after i posted it....
Quote:
DW: Do you have any thoughts on the Big Kit vs. Small Kit debate?
DF: Picasso would use a black pencil to create great art. Da Vinci used a variety of colors and mixed his paint with lead to create the most vivid colors possible, and he used all of the colors that he had available to him. Who was the better artist? I canít think small kit/large kit. Just because someone has a larger vocabulary, they have more to say? Theyíre a deeper person, or they have better emotions? There are levels of expression for every size of kit. If someone reaches me deeply on a small kit, and those are the tools that they need, great. My object is just to learn all of the tools. If you choose to have all of the tools, and then you choose to build a little birdhouse, and the next guy chooses to build a skyscraper, sometimes I find great beauty and sanctity in the birdhouse. Thereís nothing wrong with the carpenter who built that, as opposed to the architect who built the skyscraper. If I start to analyze the size of the building and the worth that it offers, then I think Iím losing what art is about. To me, thatís spending too much time on a small part and not looking at the big picture. I was at the Louvre when I went to see the Mona Lisa, and as I saw this 500-year-old work of art I was brought to tears. I felt that Leonardo da Vinci was speaking to me from his grave. And as I stood there in tears, another gentleman walked up beside me and said, ďMy gosh, look at all of the cracks in this picture. Why donít they fix it?Ē In life this happens, and in all art this happens. Do you see the great depths of beauty, or do you focus on the cracks? Iím too busy enjoying the beauty. That to me is where we must begin.
j
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Old 01-31-2006, 10:16 AM
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T.Underhill T.Underhill is offline
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Default Re: THE BIG KITS VS SMALL KITS DEBATE

Big kits...small kits, whatever. I'll play on a 4 piece any day of the week, in fact the next one I get will be a 4 piece. Right now I like my kits big!! I enjoy having more options for sounds, that's all. Well, and they look great too! Two 9 pieces, a 10 pc, and an 11 pc. Click the sig. linky.
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