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  #1  
Old 12-26-2011, 04:32 AM
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Default Mortality and our fleeting legacy

I've been tidying up my dad's house and found a bunch of books in a box. Each is an anthology that contain at least one short story by my mother (who was a writer and book reviewer).

She'd marked each book's index to highlight her story. No doubt she was very proud when these were published, especially when she was younger. Yet, here are the books - unseen until now - forgotten, ignored, inconsequential. I'm in the process of cataloguing them now to add to her scanty Wikipedia profile.

I think of all the recordings (unreleased) that I've done and realise that it's only of use to me - while I remain interested. Even if I did have something released it would make little difference.

Funny thing. We think we have something to say but it's all very temporary and, ultimately, it doesn't matter.

I don't mean for this to be heavy, just that I had such a strong sense of this while going through the anthologies. As Yesdog's sig says "It's all about fun people!"

(I'm assuming that he's saying to people that it's all about fun ... not that it's all about "fun people" :)
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Old 12-26-2011, 04:58 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

It's a good thing to experience the immensity of this life we find ourselves in. Without mortality none of it would be so profound, you know. Life would be a real drag if we all lived forever.
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Old 12-26-2011, 05:03 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

Funny, now I understand when bassist Tony Levin said; "It's nice when you can just play your music and it goes out into the air". I think he meant what he does is just to be enjoyed right then and there. I feel the same way now. I've made horrid recordings of myself (probably still do) and it was only important to me then, at that time. It's not even important to me now - if it was I wouldn't be so embarrassed about them now. But I was proud of it back then - just as I'd be proud of something I made right now. But who knows how I'd feel about it in five or even seven years?

I think, more importantly, when I realized I'm not into drumming and music to become a star, but just how it makes me feel, when I realized all that, everything became more fun. I stopped taking everything so seriously and just did what I do and if it didn't work out, I was happy that I did it anyway. It's become much more important that I 'took that step outside the box' rather than failing at the attempt because I've realized not everyone can 'step outside the box' as easily as I can.

Kudos to you for cataloging your mother's work. My parents don't have anything to catalog, other than being the parents of three kids and making sure there was always a home to come to.
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Old 12-26-2011, 05:48 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

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It's a good thing to experience the immensity of this life we find ourselves in. Without mortality none of it would be so profound, you know. Life would be a real drag if we all lived forever.
Coincidentally, I'm currently reading Anne Rice's The Vampire Chronicles, where the vamps are all wrestling with the complexity of living forever (as long as they avoid the sun and fire) in different ways, trying to find a way for it to be meaningful and to reconcile themselves with the nightly murder they commit to stay alive ... which, for them, is equivalent to feeling the morality of a vegetarianism but needing to eat meat to stay alive.


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Funny, now I understand when bassist Tony Levin said; "It's nice when you can just play your music and it goes out into the air". I think he meant what he does is just to be enjoyed right then and there. I feel the same way now.

... I stopped taking everything so seriously and just did what I do and if it didn't work out, I was happy that I did it anyway. It's become much more important that I 'took that step outside the box' rather than failing at the attempt because I've realized not everyone can 'step outside the box' as easily as I can.
Yes, music is ultimately about the moment. I've always been a recording freak, which is maybe like someone who spends all their holidays taking photos. It calls to mind this cartoon:



The cataloguing is a bigger job than I thought. I knew there was a collection of her stories published in 1967 but I did realise her work was so heavily anthologised - up to 33 so far, no counting periodicals and there are too many newspaper clippings to deal with. She wanted to write novels but she never had the knack (as she'd say "I'm a sprinter not a distance runner") so there's all these tidbits ... that have effectively gone into the ether ... just a bit slower than music.
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Old 12-26-2011, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

I think most people above the subsistence level (and maybe some who aren't) want to think their lives have meaning. Some find it in religion, some in art. Some never find it, though they want to believe.

I think what it comes down to, is this; each of us means the world to a few people, more or less, but to the world, we mean nothing. That's probably fine.

Good on you, Polly, for cataloging your mom's work.
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Old 12-26-2011, 07:46 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

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I think most people above the subsistence level (and maybe some who aren't) want to think their lives have meaning. Some find it in religion, some in art. Some never find it, though they want to believe.

I think what it comes down to, is this; each of us means the world to a few people, more or less, but to the world, we mean nothing. That's probably fine.

Good on you, Polly, for cataloging your mom's work.
What keeps you going is that those few people also mean the world to you, eh?
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Old 12-26-2011, 09:52 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

...

and I thought I was the one with all the wierd zen threads.. ; )

I do get a sense of what you are feeling because I've experienced some of what you are going through.

Its easier to be philosophical as we get older but ultimately it is about 'playing your music' ( read metaphor for life ) .. So what is our legacy, then?

I wear an old Tshirt very proudly which has a man and his dog walking into the horizon and it says Dont Leave a Trace . Its an axiom that I'm getting more and more comfortable with. Ashes to ashes dust to dust.

I have come to believe that the living moment, the here and the now, is the only truth that I can old on to, and everything else is just notes in the air. People who believe otherwise are chasing life's many shaggy dogs, including the desperate need to be relevant, meaningful, impactful, rich whatever...
Perhaps I say this is with the advatage of some hindsight, having some 50 odd years under my belt and after one has fought many of lifes battles, some won, some lost and some drawn.

As Bo said, creating a home that feels warm and inviting always, is Nobel Prize- worthy in my silly opinion too. I know you are an admirer of Geoge Carlin and his take on who we are as a species and our role on this planet is highly self indulgent and arrogant.

Accomplishment is what it is in the end. The need to evaluate ourselves. But by what rule do we measure? Paul McCartney, Steve Jobbs or Bo's parents. They all created something that someone else drew inspiration and strength from. Who judges?

As for your music, I think it lives in you, the person and not on your disk drive, or your recordings. Its the people you touch through any medium.

As a kid, my world was transformed forever, not only beause I heard the Beatles, Zepplin, or any of the big 'game changers'. It changed because I heard Paul Nye play a major 7th arpeggio in a cheap dive I'd snuck into in NYC.

I dont know what became of Paul Nye or what his legacy was, but I know for sure that I am a part of it.
And he doesnt know that.

...

Last edited by aydee; 12-26-2011 at 10:37 AM.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:27 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

People talk about leaving your mark on the world but I like the "Good Camper" slogan that says that you should use the campground and enjoy it but leave everything as you found it for the next guy.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:38 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

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What keeps you going is that those few people also mean the world to you, eh?
Not to mention plain old enjoyment. I certainly don't do creative things for those close to me. Certainly my family and (non band) friends couldn't care less about my toons and music.

Humans have an urge to create and express themselves. An interesting article about it here
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Old 12-26-2011, 02:20 PM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

In our lives, we are constantly influenced by what has happened or been said in the past, as well as being influnced by what is happening and being said alonside our day to day lives.

As an exemple, what my parents have taught me, gave me (as an education as well as their view on life) will remains with me until I die, the same apply to some school teachers, my best friends, the best musicians I've played with, they all influenced my life one way or another. These "absorbed" influences within ourselves are then "transmitted" to the next generation, whatever it's done conciously or un-counciously.

Now this applied to my parents and as it is to my daughter, they have and are being influenced by the past and the present moments of their lives.

I tend to think that the legacy of people who have passed away are living within us today, and I believe that my legacy, once I'm gone, will live in my daughter and her children (she hasn't got any yet) and through the people I've touched one way or another with sufficient impact to change their view on a given subject for the rest of their life.

(The cataloguing is a bigger job than I thought...) Good on you to do this for you mom and good luck with it.... :-))
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Old 12-26-2011, 03:37 PM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

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What keeps you going is that those few people also mean the world to you, eh?
It sure helps keep me going sometimes, Bo!

I'm not much for having a detailed, well thought-out philosophy of life, (I'm open, pay attention, and assimilate what I learn, but I have NOTHING figured out yet!) but it seems to me that the life force has to come from within - some people, with all the love and support in the world just don't make it, while others, under the most awful circumstances, survive and even thrive.

Speaking only for myself, I know there are times when knowing someone else needs and loves me helps me face things in life I probably wouldn't otherwise choose to face. But I also don't have the "live to serve" personality either - like Polly, I do things that please me and let me express myself. I just don't entertain any illusions that they are going to have any long-lasting legacy. Those things are for me and the people around me who enjoy them, and they are for now.

And now it's time for me to wade back out - I feel the waters lapping at my chin, and I'm not very tall! lol
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Old 12-26-2011, 03:44 PM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

“We are but a moment’s sunlight fading in the grass”
- Chet Powers – “Get Together” (The Youngbloods)

I used to really believe this was the sum of our timeon earth until my father passed away. His funeral was standing room only (600+ people) and it became clear to me that each of us has an effect on others that is not temporary so, in some way, we all contribute to the dirction of mankind. Sort of heavy and sappy but it is really true. Life is short and just a speck of dust in terms of the history of the earth but we all matter to someone.

Music/drumming have inspred me every day to make the most of my time here and since his passing I have really been making a point of making the most of my time and every hour for that matter.

Dont let grass grow under your feet. If you want to do something, go do it. You have forever to be dead and just a short while to live.

(please interpret this in a positive mannerr- it really is a simple set of rules to live by)
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:53 PM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

Imagine trying to live without changing anything. You'd never be able to walk on a lawn.

I don't think anything stays the same, really. So we are all part of that change, whether we think we are or not.
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Old 12-27-2011, 12:39 AM
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Default Re: Mortality and our fleeting legacy

At least we do something that can be recorded and preserved for the enjoyment of future generations, something no insurance salesman could say. I think it's important to record. I made a thread about this about a year ago, basically stating that uploading recordings here on the internet, is a way to start a legacy. My great great grandchildren will be able to listen to me, my voice, my work, and have something tangible that they can go to, and access at anytime if they are interested. My descendants...the only thing that may survive is pictures, which are a great thing too. But recording yourself in the present year...is like a time capsule. The things we take for granted now (Oh man, I was dragging on that tune) will be fondly looked back upon for their historical context.

Playing makes me temporarily happy, but having recordings of my playing gives me real long lasting pleasure. I am so grateful for all the recordings I have, it's a musical timeline of my life. Preserving a whole night of music, the memories, the atmosphere, the people...everything....is something I am very keen on doing. I want to preserve my efforts. I am grateful that what we do is easily preserved. Many professions cannot say that. Sure I am an electrician, and I can say, hey I rewired that house. But no one see's my wiring. Whereas my recordings...my mark is all over that recording.
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Old 12-27-2011, 01:42 AM
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At least we do something that can be recorded and preserved for the enjoyment of future generations, something no insurance salesman could say.

...The things we take for granted now (Oh man, I was dragging on that tune) will be fondly looked back upon for their historical context.
Not so sure about that, Larry. It seems to me that after we die almost all of it disappears into the ether, unless you're John Lennon, Michael Jackson, Buddy Rich etc. For most of us, our recordings' lifespan is pretty well the same as our own.

Your grandkids will only care up to the point of "Oh, Grandpa Larry was a drummer. Cool" (or they'll ask "What's a drummer?"). Then there's a good chance that they'll hear two bars of your music, get bored, and move on.

I've tried reading mum's stories and, while I can tell they are very well written, it's not a style I enjoy.


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Playing makes me temporarily happy
I think this is 99% of the point of playing.


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, but having recordings of my playing gives me real long lasting pleasure. I am so grateful for all the recordings I have, it's a musical timeline of my life. Preserving a whole night of music, the memories, the atmosphere, the people...everything....is something I am very keen on doing. I want to preserve my efforts. I am grateful that what we do is easily preserved.
Yes, long lasting pleasure that lasts the distance of our life span ...
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Old 12-27-2011, 02:20 AM
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I think what it comes down to, is this; each of us means the world to a few people, more or less, but to the world, we mean nothing. That's probably fine.
Well said.

I actually wonder if things haven't changed with the advent of the interwebs. I mean, I have stuff on YouTube that will probably still exist in some shape or form that subsequent generations can access. If my grandkids want to see their grandpa play the drums, they'll be able to, assuming technology or legislation doesn't subtract what's currently available.

This isn't like 30 years ago where it was a big deal to have a recording of yourself and it involved something you couldn't distribute without having a record deal. Anybody can upload media to the internet and it becomes essentially public property.
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Old 12-27-2011, 03:58 AM
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I actually wonder if things haven't changed with the advent of the interwebs. I mean, I have stuff on YouTube that will probably still exist in some shape or form that subsequent generations can access.
I think that was the case a decade ago but now there's so much material out there that each unknown item fades into increasing anonymity. If I wasn't on this site the number of hits for each of my YouTube vids would be under 10.
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Old 12-27-2011, 04:05 AM
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I think that was the case a decade ago but now there's so much material out there that each unknown item fades into increasing anonymity. If I wasn't on this site the number of hits for each of my YouTube vids would be under 10.
I watched one of your video the other day, and girl, I was scared, not by the music, the video started with the face of a girl upside down with horrible make up and green hair, scary nightmare stuff.. ;-))
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Old 12-27-2011, 04:54 AM
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I think that was the case a decade ago but now there's so much material out there that each unknown item fades into increasing anonymity. If I wasn't on this site the number of hits for each of my YouTube vids would be under 10.
I guess I'm not so much talking about my music becoming important or recognized outside my immediately circle, but rather that something isn't necessarily going to be relegated to sitting in a box that might never be opened again after I die. That was the thing I zeroed in on from your OP.

People search their family trees to trace their roots all the time using genealogy sites. I just mean that anyone interested in my family lineage could find more about me online in a few minutes than our parents' generation could with months of painstaking research. Including, "Didn't he play the drums? Let's look. Oh, yeah. There he is. That was his band. Wow, his left hand is amazing!"

Okay, I may have taken liberties with some of that dialogue :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 05:52 AM
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Not so sure about that, Larry. It seems to me that after we die almost all of it disappears into the ether, unless you're John Lennon, Michael Jackson, Buddy Rich etc. For most of us, our recordings' lifespan is pretty well the same as our own.

Don't understand this or agree with it. Recordings won't delete themselves from the net when I die

Your grandkids will only care up to the point of "Oh, Grandpa Larry was a drummer. Cool" (or they'll ask "What's a drummer?"). Then there's a good chance that they'll hear two bars of your music, get bored, and move on.

So you're saying my music is boring? lol JK. Were you bored cataloging your Mom's writings? Even if they do get bored, at least they can actually see what I was like, how I moved, my expressions, and a hundred other nuances

I've tried reading mum's stories and, while I can tell they are very well written, it's not a style I enjoy.




I think this is 99% of the point of playing.

Disagree here too, I play for the music and the others. Being happy is a side effect


Yes, long lasting pleasure that lasts the distance of our life span ...
Again, recordings on the internet, assuming they stay there, will outlast me. Don't understand your logic here
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Old 12-27-2011, 06:50 AM
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A long time ago, in galaxy far away (when I realized that I wasn't going to be a rockstar), I came to conclusion that all I really wanted to do was make some recordings that I could be proud of. Much like a photograph (and even better in some ways), something that my children, their children and, hopefully, beyond cound or would appreciate later on in time. Not that all of them would, but maybe some of them, who themselves would become musicians, would appreciate. Maybe even get some inspiration in the fact that this runs in the family to some degree. We never know. In some cases it takes someone like you, Polly, to take the time to preserve this for future generations to enjoy. It is not up to us to determine what level of "enjoyment" will be be had of it, but the hope that it will be appreciated by some.
Now, when I say 'recordings that I can be proud of", I am a long way off from that. But, I know me well enough to know that I'll probably never really be "proud'. It's a never ending search for for satisfaction. I think this is what plagues most artists. You shouldn't sell yourself so short when it comes to your own recordings.
I look at it this way, if someone were to give me an old, scratchy musical recording from one of my great- great grandfathers (or mothers) it would be charished by me no matter the quality of talent, but because I would have comfort in knowing that musicainship runs in my family and there is a heritage there.
I commend you for cataloging your mother's legacy and I hope you and your dad are doing well this holiday season.
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Old 12-27-2011, 07:08 AM
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I watched one of your video the other day, and girl, I was scared, not by the music, the video started with the face of a girl upside down with horrible make up and green hair, scary nightmare stuff.. ;-))
That was Who Is That Calling Me Now by my weird old early 80s band. The silly visual kind of suited the song, though, didn't it? :)


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People search their family trees to trace their roots all the time using genealogy sites. I just mean that anyone interested in my family lineage could find more about me online in a few minutes than our parents' generation could with months of painstaking research.
That's true. We can leave breadcrumbs. However, mum's work was used in plenty of high profile publications but now her work is historical and largely forgotten. Grains of sand on a beach. Thing is, she always eschewed the literary scene and had few contacts and friends in her field. So when she passed away, few literary people knew or were strongly impacted by her passing and her work sunk under the weight of new works.

If you're not the creme de la creme then hardly anyone (sometimes no one) gives a damn - apart from people who like you.


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Recordings won't delete themselves from the net when I die
No (though they may be archived) but who's going to play them?


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Were you bored cataloging your Mom's writings? Even if they do get bored, at least they can actually see what I was like, how I moved, my expressions, and a hundred other nuances
Have to say it was a chore. Her grandson has never read her stories and he's not interested. He's not much keen on books per se - he prefers music, girls, movies and games.

We get obsolete pretty fast these days.


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Disagree here too, I play for the music and the others. Being happy is a side effect
But that's why you want to make others happy - it makes you happy to make them happy. You play music to be happy - be instant happiness or extended happiness via recordings (despite the cringe moments).

I hope you don't ask me what my point is because I'm getting lost now :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 07:51 AM
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My intention is not to have the world appreciate my stuff, I couldn't care less. My impetus is to leave breadcrumbs (love that term) for my descendants who are interested. I want what I love to be able to be shared after I'm gone with anyone who is interested enough in me to look. If no one looks, whatever, but I am going to make sure I leave something to find for the ones who are interested. I think my descendants would be mad that I didn't leave them anything, when it's so easy to. That's selfish in a way. To live your entire life and to have nothing to show for all the time you spent on the thing you love the most...is a pity. Recordings are like fossils, they tell a story. I've loved listening to and making recordings as long as I can remember. The recordings of my sons voice when he was 2 and my grandfathers voice before he died are precious to me. My recordings are the most valuable aspect of my music. Because they last, unlike my own memories.

In my mind, being a musician and having no recordings is like being a fine artist who paints with a paint that disappears as soon as it's finished. It's like it never happened. All that work with nothing to show. What a pity.
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Old 12-27-2011, 08:36 AM
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In my mind, being a musician and having no recordings is like being a fine artist who paints with a paint that disappears as soon as it's finished. It's like it never happened. All that work with nothing to show. What a pity.
Thing is, it's only relatively recently that musicians could record. Until then it all went into the air (or, later, on paper). That suggests that the main point of music is not to leave evidence but the feelings while it's happening. The recording is just a bonus.
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Old 12-27-2011, 09:31 AM
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I dont know what became of Paul Nye or what his legacy was, but I know for sure that I am a part of it.
And he doesnt know that.

...
Yesterday, I crouched down between the adjacent graves of my parents. I placed both hands directly over their heads to connect them together through me, & I watched my tears absorb into the earth below me. I smiled, as for the first time since their deaths, I remembered their smiles, rather than the horror of the time prior to their demise. My parents are buried in a woodland, with no headstones or anything to mark their presence. They wanted to be there as a part of the landscape, & only the ones who's lives they touched would identify with the location. My mother said, "when I'm in the ground, look to the sky". I did.

The point I'm making is that it's often the small things that last in the consciousness of others, not the things we believe will be our legacy. My mother's legacy to me is her smile, & behind that smile, all the values that she held as dear. If we strive to leave a legacy, especially something we regard as special or unique in some way, it's more likely to be the tiny things, a moment, a smile, that stays with the ones we've touched along the way.

As for my music, it's future is inconsequential to those I care about, & even if I was lucky enough to leave some fantastic piece of music that was appreciated by millions, it wouldn't be the music itself that touched the individual, it would be the memories evoked by association. Very few people in life really touch you, & by the same mechanism, you truly touch only a handful yourself. Let your music be a joy of the moment. A joy for you, a joy for those you are entertaining. It's really nothing more than that, but if you're lucky, your music will be the catalyst for something that really touches someone else, & that will most likely be the memory of a smile.
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Old 12-27-2011, 10:17 AM
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Yesterday, I crouched down between the adjacent graves of my parents. I placed both hands directly over their heads to connect them together through me, & I watched my tears absorb into the earth below me. I smiled, as for the first time since their deaths, I remembered their smiles, rather than the horror of the time prior to their demise. My parents are buried in a woodland, with no headstones or anything to mark their presence. They wanted to be there as a part of the landscape, & only the ones who's lives they touched would identify with the location. My mother said, "when I'm in the ground, look to the sky". I did.

The point I'm making is that it's often the small things that last in the consciousness of others, not the things we believe will be our legacy. My mother's legacy to me is her smile, & behind that smile, all the values that she held as dear. If we strive to leave a legacy, especially something we regard as special or unique in some way, it's more likely to be the tiny things, a moment, a smile, that stays with the ones we've touched along the way.

As for my music, it's future is inconsequential to those I care about, & even if I was lucky enough to leave some fantastic piece of music that was appreciated by millions, it wouldn't be the music itself that touched the individual, it would be the memories evoked by association. Very few people in life really touch you, & by the same mechanism, you truly touch only a handful yourself. Let your music be a joy of the moment. A joy for you, a joy for those you are entertaining. It's really nothing more than that, but if you're lucky, your music will be the catalyst for something that really touches someone else, & that will most likely be the memory of a smile.
I get what your parents felt, Andy.

Conversely,

.... my mother was a writer and a singer. She performed and recorded a fair amount. She also had hundreds of tapes of some well known opera singers, and classical musicians, in conversation-performance, rehearsals... valueable stuff- she thought. Given my interest in music, she wanted to make sure I inherited her collection. The passage of time and my lack of interest in the years following her death destroyed and de- oxidized all the tapes, and today theres is nothing.
Similarly, my father collected antique furniture for 20 years, not because he loved it, but because he thought he would bequeath something of value & wondferful to the homes of his 2 sons. Lo and behold when the time came, both his sons prefer not to have that furniture in their homes, and all of it today is rotting in our basements.

All the plans on mice and men...


....
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Old 12-27-2011, 10:59 AM
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I get what your parents felt, Andy.

Conversely,

.... my mother was a writer and a singer. She performed and recorded a fair amount. She also had hundreds of tapes of some well known opera singers, and classical musicians, in conversation-performance, rehearsals... valueable stuff- she thought. Given my interest in music, she wanted to make sure I inherited her collection. The passage of time and my lack of interest in the years following her death destroyed and de- oxidized all the tapes, and today theres is nothing.
Similarly, my father collected antique furniture for 20 years, not because he loved it, but because he thought he would bequeath something of value & wondferful to the homes of his 2 sons. Lo and behold when the time came, both his sons prefer not to have that furniture in their homes, and all of it today is rotting in our basements.

All the plans on mice and men...


....
Such a shame Abe. Makes me think if I should leave my prototype kit to my son. Even though he appreciates the sound of the kit, I think the aesthetic is way off the mark for him. I'd hate to think of it rotting in a basement. Guess I'll just have to give it to Larry :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:23 AM
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Guess I'll just have to give it to Larry :)
Honestly??? its not as ludicrous a thought as it might seem. People should have stuff they really want- even if they are heirlooms.

...
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:27 AM
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.... my mother was a writer and a singer. She performed and recorded a fair amount. She also had hundreds of tapes of some well known opera singers, and classical musicians, in conversation-performance, rehearsals... valueable stuff- she thought. Given my interest in music, she wanted to make sure I inherited her collection. The passage of time and my lack of interest in the years following her death destroyed and de- oxidized all the tapes, and today theres is nothing.
Similarly, my father collected antique furniture for 20 years, not because he loved it, but because he thought he would bequeath something of value & wondferful to the homes of his 2 sons. Lo and behold when the time came, both his sons prefer not to have that furniture in their homes, and all of it today is rotting in our basements.

All the plans on mice and men
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Makes me think if I should leave my prototype kit to my son. Even though he appreciates the sound of the kit, I think the aesthetic is way off the mark for him. I'd hate to think of it rotting in a basement. Guess I'll just have to give it to Larry :)
Yep yep yep. I look at the things my parents see of value and most of it I see as old, dirty, worn out and, well, a bit icky lol (apart from the old record players).

My nephew will feel exactly the same way about my stuff. When I was cleaning out dad's place before moving in I must have put 100s of bottles and little containers that he'd kept for decades in the recycle bin ... I'm hoping not to leave a similar legacy with my earthly remains.

I think the trick is to train your beneficiaries from an early age to be heavily interested in history / vintage things :) There's probably millions of young people (and maybe some not so young) who think the iPhone 3 is old hat ...
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Old 12-27-2011, 12:06 PM
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Guess I'll just have to give it to Larry :)
No, no, not Larry! .... me, me, me..... ;-)

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That was Who Is That Calling Me Now by my weird old early 80s band. The silly visual kind of suited the song, though, didn't it? :)
Yep, it sure did... :-)

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You play music to be happy - be instant happiness or extended happiness via recordings (despite the cringe moments).
How so true, I have dozens of tapes that I hate to listen to nowadays... :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 12:55 PM
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No, no, not Larry! .... me, me, me..... ;-)
Henri, hopefully, I won't have to give it to anyone any time soon :) It's also probably the nearest I'll get to a physical manifestation of my legacy, for what it's worth.
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Old 12-27-2011, 01:10 PM
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Henri, hopefully, I won't have to give it to anyone any time soon :) It's also probably the nearest I'll get to a physical manifestation of my legacy, for what it's worth.
Ditto for me, and the inheritance of my drumset is already planned, it goes to the son of of the Godfather of my daughter. He's so much in love with it. :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 01:30 PM
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When I croak I expect my kit will be on eBay before you can say Generation Y!
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Old 12-27-2011, 01:47 PM
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I do get a sense of what you are feeling because I've experienced some of what you are going through.

Its easier to be philosophical as we get older but ultimately it is about 'playing your music' ( read metaphor for life ) .. So what is our legacy, then?

I wear an old T-shirt very proudly which has a man and his dog walking into the horizon and it says Don't Leave a Trace . Its an axiom that I'm getting more and more comfortable with. Ashes to ashes dust to dust.

I have come to believe that the living moment, the here and the now, is the only truth that I can old on to, and everything else is just notes in the air. People who believe otherwise are chasing life's many shaggy dogs, including the desperate need to be relevant, meaningful, impactful, rich whatever...
Perhaps I say this is with the advantage of some hindsight, having some 50 odd years under my belt and after one has fought many of life's battles, some won, some lost and some drawn.

As Bo said, creating a home that feels warm and inviting always, is Nobel Prize- worthy in my silly opinion too. I know you are an admirer of George Carlin and his take on who we are as a species and our role on this planet is highly self indulgent and arrogant.

Accomplishment is what it is in the end. The need to evaluate ourselves. But by what rule do we measure? Paul McCartney, Steve Jobs or Bo's parents. They all created something that someone else drew inspiration and strength from. Who judges?

As for your music, I think it lives in you, the person and not on your disk drive, or your recordings. Its the people you touch through any medium.

As a kid, my world was transformed forever, not only because I heard the Beatles, Zeppelin, or any of the big 'game changers'. It changed because I heard Paul Nye play a major 7th arpeggio in a cheap dive I'd snuck into in NYC.

I don't know what became of Paul Nye or what his legacy was, but I know for sure that I am a part of it.
And he doesn't know that.
Sorry, I missed this fabulous post earlier. An Abe special :)

Don't Leave a Trace ... well, like the man's dog walking into the horizon, we can't help but to leave few, um ... traces behind us, eh?

It's a romantic notion (Abe, a romantic? Perish the thought :) to whisk through life as lightly as a ghost but we human enjoy doing things that leave "traces" for others to "sniff". Whether anyone does sniff them, well, that's their business ...

So true about little things having the biggest impact and that we can unwittingly transform each other's lives with the simplest things.
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Old 12-27-2011, 04:34 PM
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...

and I thought I was the one with all the wierd zen threads.. ; )

I do get a sense of what you are feeling because I've experienced some of what you are going through.

Its easier to be philosophical as we get older but ultimately it is about 'playing your music' ( read metaphor for life ) .. So what is our legacy, then?

I wear an old Tshirt very proudly which has a man and his dog walking into the horizon and it says Dont Leave a Trace . Its an axiom that I'm getting more and more comfortable with. Ashes to ashes dust to dust.

I have come to believe that the living moment, the here and the now, is the only truth that I can old on to, and everything else is just notes in the air. People who believe otherwise are chasing life's many shaggy dogs, including the desperate need to be relevant, meaningful, impactful, rich whatever...
Perhaps I say this is with the advatage of some hindsight, having some 50 odd years under my belt and after one has fought many of lifes battles, some won, some lost and some drawn.

As Bo said, creating a home that feels warm and inviting always, is Nobel Prize- worthy in my silly opinion too. I know you are an admirer of Geoge Carlin and his take on who we are as a species and our role on this planet is highly self indulgent and arrogant.

Accomplishment is what it is in the end. The need to evaluate ourselves. But by what rule do we measure? Paul McCartney, Steve Jobbs or Bo's parents. They all created something that someone else drew inspiration and strength from. Who judges?

As for your music, I think it lives in you, the person and not on your disk drive, or your recordings. Its the people you touch through any medium.

As a kid, my world was transformed forever, not only beause I heard the Beatles, Zepplin, or any of the big 'game changers'. It changed because I heard Paul Nye play a major 7th arpeggio in a cheap dive I'd snuck into in NYC.

I dont know what became of Paul Nye or what his legacy was, but I know for sure that I am a part of it.
And he doesnt know that.

...
So much truth here.

It must be Christmas/Holiday time as we're getting all philosophical about mortality and loved-ones lost.
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Old 12-27-2011, 10:12 PM
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It must be Christmas/Holiday time as we're getting all philosophical about mortality and loved-ones lost.
Nah - I'm like this 24/7/365 :)
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Old 12-27-2011, 10:53 PM
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Nah - I'm like this 24/7/365 :)
Now, I'm really considering that love fest.... ;-))
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Old 12-28-2011, 07:47 AM
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Now, I'm really considering that love fest.... ;-))
If you enjoy deep ...

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Old 12-28-2011, 11:30 AM
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If you enjoy deep ...

May the force be with you Polly ;-))
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Old 12-29-2011, 03:23 AM
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I think that was the case a decade ago but now there's so much material out there that each unknown item fades into increasing anonymity. If I wasn't on this site the number of hits for each of my YouTube vids would be under 10.
I certainly like your bands version of It's a Man's (Man's) World. That really is some soulful drumming. I didn't make that comment on YouTube, but I certainly agree.

As far as the whole philosophy thing, I'm not going to try to say something meaningful because I'll probably just say something stupid. All I can do is try to leave the best impression I can on everyone I think deserves it. To me, life is all about living a life worth living. I'm not going to spend my life being miserable just so that i can live another 20 miserable years. I just hope I am remembered as a good person and a good drummer. That's all I care about.

My dad is remembered in the Folk music, specifically as an Autoharp player and luthier. He is as important to those circles as any drummer on the home page of Drummerworld is to drumming. He never got rich or anything, but he made his mark. I'll probably never measure up to him musically, nevertheless I can enjoy playing music just the same.
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