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  #1  
Old 06-12-2011, 09:22 AM
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chrisftl chrisftl is offline
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I have this discontinued Yamaha CS925 boom stand that is HUMONGOUS. I bought it off musiciansfriend thinking it would be perfect for my new ride about 3 years ago. I made it work (sorta) and it's bearable, but it's time for me to take a hacksaw to that damn thing.


I don't know if you can tell from the picture, but it takes up most of my floor space on the right of my bass drum and makes it awkward to put any more stands there. As far as the boom with the counter-weight goes, I think the picture sufficiently shows how nicely it protrudes - I don't like it.

I know what I want to do, but as I'm still a bit of a noobie to DIY, I need to know what these are, how to remove them, and how to put them back:


^This is my one of my stand's legs (I'm trying to disassemble all the legs to isolate the main stand rod and start cutting it to size), so they are both of the same type and size in each picture; I brightened up a tiny square section in photoshop to make it easier to see, and now I realize I made it look like a bolt. OOPS.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:32 AM
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Nodiggie Nodiggie is offline
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Default Re: Quick Question - New Member

Welcome to the forum.

The first photo is a set screw with socket hex. You should be able to remove it with little effort using a hex key a.k.a. Allen wrench. The second photo of the bottom leg stand looks like a blind rivit type fastener. They can be drilled out but that would obviously destroy it. Not sure why you need to remove it but I guess you could use a small bolt with nylon lock nut put back in place loose enough to allow it move freely. The nylon lock nut will stay in place as soon as the bolt passed thru, this will allow the nut to be tight on the bolt without tightening all the way.
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Old 06-13-2011, 02:47 AM
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chrisftl chrisftl is offline
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Thanks.

You were right about the hex screw in the counter-weight. I couldn't really tell it was a hex when I inspected it; I thought it was a rivet. I was drawing a blank last night and forgot what the technical term for pop rivets was when I was looking at my stand's leg construction. All I actually wanted to know was how to remove rivets and make your own, but since I had forgotten the name, I needed to be reminded what they were.

Stage 1 is complete. I shortened my boom arm by exactly 7.5 inches a few hours ago. It looks clean considering it's my first time doing anything "custom" to my set, and it's SO much nicer to adjust already even though I'm not done.



With what I'm planning to do once everything is said and done, it will be a VERY custom job. This picture should explain pretty well why I want to "destroy" the rivets on my stand's legs. It is still wayyyy too tall for where I want my ride to be:

As you can see, I push my legs out the lowest they can go, which not only makes for a tight fit in that corner itself, but a tight (if not impossible) fit for other stands, and I still have to compensate with the boom arm by tilting it downwards, which looks a little retarded IMO. I wanted to cut from the bottom up, but if I can get the "tightener" off (which I'm not sure how) and cut from the top down, that might be easier and I wouldn't have to take the legs off. So I reiterate: any advice? Criticisms?
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Old 06-13-2011, 05:50 AM
audiotech
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Can you also take the clamp off the top of the first section of your stand (the collar where the adjustment screw is located) and take about 8 or 10" of that and then re-install the collar? You'll probably have to take the same amount off the bottom of the top section of the stand also.

Just another idea so that you won't have to fully expand the legs of the stand thus taking up too much room. I didn't take a look at my Yamaha hardware, but there should also be some kind of fastener holding the adjustment collar unto the bottom upright. You can see a tiny hole where an allen or "hex" type screw on the center cymbal stand where the "Firth" is located.



Dennis
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Old 06-13-2011, 08:25 AM
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Homeularis Homeularis is offline
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Default Re: Quick Question - New Member

Dont wanna rain, but I have to ask...With the tons and tons of used gear out there, why didnt you just put it on Craigslist or whatever and trade it for something more to your liking.
You had (and maybe still have) the upper hand with the bigger and more heavy duty piece to trade for something lower and shorter.
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Old 06-13-2011, 12:53 PM
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chrisftl chrisftl is offline
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Yeah, my adjustment collar is built the same as yours. So it's another hex screw? I'll check that out (Maybe I just have bad eyesight. It all looks like rivets to me - they're so tiny). It would be much easier to just take that off, cut from there, and put back on instead of disassemble the legs; cut; put back on like I was originally planning on doing.

There's a reason I don't want to part with the stand. I thought that out before proceeding with my decision and it may not make sense to some, but I doubt anyone would buy a stand this enormous (unless they like jumping out of their seats to play their rides - there isn't a crash/china on the market that would require a stand this beefy/sturdy) that has been discontinued for years anyway, so I took the risk (not to mention the poor resale value for a HEAVILY used stand like this). I figure instead of settling for what I have after ignoring it for so long, why not have fun with it, NOT spend any money with tools readily at my disposal, and make something custom that I'll stick with for life? I'll stick with it for life because I know where I like my ride to be, I know where it's most comfortable, and I'll always have it in that configuration, no matter how many toms to the left and right of me - my ride stand (if I don't ruin it) will be tailored to that if done right. There's not much reason to sell it.

That and it's just a quality goddamn stand. I type too much. I'll let you all know how the rest of my little project goes as I finish. Thanks.
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Old 06-13-2011, 07:12 PM
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harryconway harryconway is offline
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Default Re: Quick Question - New Member

Seems to me, your ride cymbal position could be had with just a straight cymbal stand.
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  #8  
Old 06-14-2011, 12:27 AM
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Homeularis Homeularis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harryconway View Post
Seems to me, your ride cymbal position could be had with just a straight cymbal stand.

+1, or a small boom with no counter weight.

No, I get it. If you love it, you love it. :)
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