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  #1  
Old 03-28-2011, 02:51 AM
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THE MUFFIN MAN THE MUFFIN MAN is offline
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Default Mics/Mixer question

what type of mixer do i need for a 7 piece mic set? do i need one with an input for each mic? most of the mixers i can afford only have 4 direct mic inputs, but i have seen some marked 3/4 and 5/6 7/8 etc. how are those inputs used for more than 1 mic? sorry for the newbie question.
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2011, 03:03 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Short answer is yes, you need an input for each mic. Those additional inputs you see are line inputs, rather than balanced XLR inputs. You can get an adapter to fit an XLR cable to those 1/4 inputs, but you lose the advantages of low impedance cables. IF you run short cables, and work in low electrical noise areas, you can make it work, but it's not ideal.

Alternatively, if that 7 mic kit has condensers for overheads, you can run a bass mic, snare mic, and two overheads. Just wait until you get a bigger board to use the other mics?
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Old 03-28-2011, 03:10 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

thanx. i am so new at this that all i've been reading and watching has only confused me even more! lol.
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Old 03-28-2011, 03:19 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

3 or 4 point micing is really all you need. It captures a kit nicely
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Old 03-28-2011, 04:47 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
3 or 4 point micing is really all you need. It captures a kit nicely
well, i can get a nice deal on a 7 piece set up, so i figure i'll have 3 extra for later on if and when i get a better mixer,
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Old 03-28-2011, 04:53 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Find yourself a used Mackie 1402 VLZ. It'll handle six mics at once. OR, find a Mackie 1202 VLZ that'll handle four mics at once. I just recommend the 1402 because used they're about the same price between the two, you might as well get as much as you can afford. You'll end up doing that later, anyway! Good luck!

Mackie also publishes a book on how to get the most out of your mixer (which applies to alot of mixers, not just theirs) so you can read that to familiarize yourself with how to get into mic'ing.

Getting into audio for drums is alot like getting into lighting for photographers. You begin to find out that the drums/camera don't matter that much once you start using it!
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Old 03-28-2011, 06:04 AM
audiotech
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Most affordable mixers have both microphone inputs as well as "line" level inputs or at least mic level inputs that can have their sensitivity attenuated to be able to use them for line level sources. What you're seeing is a combination of mono mic level and also, as in the case of the 3/4, 5/6 number configurations, stereo (left & right) inputs for high level sources such as Ipods, computer audio outputs and tape machine outputs. Usually you can tell how many microphone inputs, and their pre-amps, by counting the number of XLR female connectors on the mixer. The only time this is not accurate is when the mixer is only using unbalanced 1/4" phone plugs for the microphone inputs.

Shop around and try to get something with 6 to 12 balanced microphone inputs for future expansion or just plain redundancy if something should happen to one of the inputs that you're using. Good quality mixers can be found in Mackie, Yamaha, Soundcraft, Tascam, Allen & Heath and many others. It would be better to save up a few bucks more now, than latter having to buy another mixer when the four microphone channel mixer you bought just won't hackett any longer.

BTW, when you see these 12 channel mixers, they're counting every channel, both microphone and line level. So you might be getting 4 microphone mixing channels and the other 8 will be all line level which low impedance balanced microphones will not work into because of the mics very low output levels, unless the microphones are externally pre-amped before hitting the mixer.



Dennis
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  #8  
Old 03-28-2011, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

i just got my Zoom R16, love it! Best bang for your buck IMO. it's a multi track recorder, but can act as an audio interface too. If it's in your budget I highy recommend it! It has 8 combo XLR/1/4" inputs.
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  #9  
Old 06-27-2013, 11:43 PM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Dennis,

Even though this is an old thread it just helped me big time. I have been researching mics and mixers for live use and this post explained more to me than just about every other post combined. Thanks for the simple, clear, and logical explanation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by audiotech View Post
Most affordable mixers have both microphone inputs as well as "line" level inputs or at least mic level inputs that can have their sensitivity attenuated to be able to use them for line level sources. What you're seeing is a combination of mono mic level and also, as in the case of the 3/4, 5/6 number configurations, stereo (left & right) inputs for high level sources such as Ipods, computer audio outputs and tape machine outputs. Usually you can tell how many microphone inputs, and their pre-amps, by counting the number of XLR female connectors on the mixer. The only time this is not accurate is when the mixer is only using unbalanced 1/4" phone plugs for the microphone inputs.

Shop around and try to get something with 6 to 12 balanced microphone inputs for future expansion or just plain redundancy if something should happen to one of the inputs that you're using. Good quality mixers can be found in Mackie, Yamaha, Soundcraft, Tascam, Allen & Heath and many others. It would be better to save up a few bucks more now, than latter having to buy another mixer when the four microphone channel mixer you bought just won't hackett any longer.

BTW, when you see these 12 channel mixers, they're counting every channel, both microphone and line level. So you might be getting 4 microphone mixing channels and the other 8 will be all line level which low impedance balanced microphones will not work into because of the mics very low output levels, unless the microphones are externally pre-amped before hitting the mixer.



Dennis
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  #10  
Old 06-28-2013, 05:10 AM
audiotech
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Quote:
Originally Posted by drummer-russ View Post
Dennis,

Even though this is an old thread it just helped me big time. I have been researching mics and mixers for live use and this post explained more to me than just about every other post combined. Thanks for the simple, clear, and logical explanation.
Yea, that was a number of years ago, lol. Btw, I still use that Mackie on some gigs.

And you are very welcome, glad I could help.

Dennis
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  #11  
Old 06-28-2013, 01:15 PM
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Just a quick note here....

Unless you're recording analog, you'll need an interface (ie: PC soundcard), not a mixer. However if you're using this to pre-mix for the stage or whatnot then you should be fine.

Example of mixer: whatever Mackie version this is


Example of interface: TASCAM 1800-US (what I have)
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  #12  
Old 06-28-2013, 11:36 PM
csd000 csd000 is offline
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Mackie DL1608

Amazing mixer, very small for tight spaces.Great effects, 16 mic inputs, 6 foldback outs. iPad controlled from any where. Each person in the band could have there own ipad and control there own foldback.....check it out.
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  #13  
Old 06-30-2013, 03:13 AM
soulfly28 soulfly28 is offline
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Default Re: Mics/Mixer question

Here is what I have, got it for $30 shipped.

http://www.guitarcenter.com/In-Store...60-i3136133.gc

Analog and I'm using a delta 1010 pci-e card as my interface. Not a lot of eqing options, but works for what i need
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