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  #1  
Old 02-06-2010, 09:53 PM
superstar93 superstar93 is offline
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Default Help with sound proofing

I am currently looking into ways to quiet my kit.......I have turned my garage into a drum room and have had problems with it being way to loud....I cant use wall insulation because we have already installed some....I was thinking of investing an acoustic acrylic shield....any advice?
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Old 02-07-2010, 02:24 AM
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Brundlefly Brundlefly is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

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Originally Posted by superstar93 View Post
I am currently looking into ways to quiet my kit.......I have turned my garage into a drum room and have had problems with it being way to loud....I cant use wall insulation because we have already installed some....I was thinking of investing an acoustic acrylic shield....any advice?
A couple of notes:

Adding insulation to a wall will help, but it is one of the least effective materials you can add from among those materials that do actually do something. In other words, if I could only add one material to a wall to help make it better, insulation would be way down on my list from a cost/performance standpoint. By contrast, additional drywall layers, sound board and MLV would be very high on my list.

Acrylic shields help, but if sound reduction is your aim, this is not the best cost/performer either. Acrylic is used because it is see through and yet lighter and more durable than glass. If you plan on using it on stage or in recording sessions, then it might be the right place to put your money. Otherwise...

The acrylic shield thing is really just a scaled down, performance friendly version of the basic "room within a room" concept. If sound reduction is your main goal and prettiness isn't important, I would look into building a free-standing room inside your garage. Even a simple, single-stud wall design with a single layer of drywall inside and out will beat the crap out of anything you can do directly to your garage or an acrylic shield. Add even a little more smarts to your wall design and the room within a room concept starts to pull away even further.
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Old 02-07-2010, 05:22 AM
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

acoustic shield won't help much. What kind of insulation did you use? If it's the pink fiberglass stuff you wasted money you need a dense insulation like mineral wool that roxul sells.. Are you looking to control volume within the room or sound that is actually getting out?
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Old 02-07-2010, 06:36 AM
superstar93 superstar93 is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

yes im trying to keep the overall outside noise down.....ive had a little bit of complaining coming from the neighbors
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Old 02-07-2010, 07:25 AM
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

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Originally Posted by Brundlefly View Post
...I would look into building a free-standing room inside your garage. Even a simple, single-stud wall design with a single layer of drywall inside and out will beat the crap out of anything you can do directly to your garage or an acrylic shield. Add even a little more smarts to your wall design and the room within a room concept starts to pull away even further.
This is what I did and it works great, but it takes some investment in time and materials.

I used a 2x6 for the kick plate and top of wall, then used 2x4 studs alternating from one side to the other so that when sheet rock went up on both sides of the wall, the stud it attached to wasn't attached to the sheet rock on the other side at all since each stud is 2" short of being able to reach the other side. That way, there's no way the wall itself can conduct vibration the way standard wall would.

Then I alternated sheet rock / sound board / sheet rock on the inside.

When I close they door, there is almost no sound getting outside.
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Old 02-07-2010, 01:51 PM
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konaboy konaboy is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

So what have you done to the garage, type of insulation, is it a finished garage?

Here's a good place to start

http://www.acoustics101.com/
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Old 02-07-2010, 03:46 PM
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

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Originally Posted by superstar93 View Post
I am currently looking into ways to quiet my kit

Try quieting your drums instead of soundproofing the garage.

Get neoprene silencers. HQ percussion/ Vic Firth/ Zildjian etc.

http://accessories.musiciansfriend.c...ack?sku=445391
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Old 02-07-2010, 11:56 PM
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

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This is what I did and it works great, but it takes some investment in time and materials.

I used a 2x6 for the kick plate and top of wall, then used 2x4 studs alternating from one side to the other so that when sheet rock went up on both sides of the wall, the stud it attached to wasn't attached to the sheet rock on the other side at all since each stud is 2" short of being able to reach the other side. That way, there's no way the wall itself can conduct vibration the way standard wall would.

Then I alternated sheet rock / sound board / sheet rock on the inside.

When I close they door, there is almost no sound getting outside.
Yes, I like what you describe here. A staggered stud frame, standard sheet rock and sound board acting as the viscoelastic layer. Not expensive, easy to get, not too hard to build. And it really works. As mentioned, it takes some time and investment (an maybe a friend to help out), but the payout is huge.

For the OP, don't waste your energy/cash on trying to make the garage itself better. For every dollar you sink into that, 95 cents of it is wasted because the garage has limitations built in that cannot be circumvented. Up to a point, every dollar you sink into a structure like MikeM describes will return a full dollar value.
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  #9  
Old 02-08-2010, 07:24 AM
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

Get this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Peace-Musician...5610212&sr=1-1

It will explain more about sound proofing and in more detail than anyone could possibly post.
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Old 05-11-2010, 05:10 PM
Ted White Ted White is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

Not sure how this turned out, but if you decouple the walls (the staggered stud framing already described in this thread) you would not see much benefit from the soundboard.

Exchanging soundboard for massive drywall would really drive down the resonance point of the wall / ceiling, helping to isolate the low frequencies better.

Just a thought.
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  #11  
Old 05-11-2010, 06:04 PM
deryck deryck is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

Maybe talk to your neighbours and work out a time during the day that you can play. Then use pads/silencers during the other times. What MikeM said is fantastic, as well. If you're practicing with a band in there.. Are renovations possible? Is this a permanent practice space you want? There's no better way than to build a room within a room. Sound travels best through denser material. Putting space between walls is what kills the sound. Is it a temporary solution? Maybe find a new practice space.


ps. I'm not sure that the pink fibreglass insulation is a waste of money (also lots of helpful info):

http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/projec.../gypsum-1.html
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  #12  
Old 05-11-2010, 06:17 PM
Ted White Ted White is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

Insulation is an odd thing. People assume a lot of sound isolation come from using it. It's intuitive, I guess.

It's good to use in moderation. I say this because it's often over-compressed, which allows it to conduct a vibration. Deryck is on the money with the pink stuff. Or yellow. Standard fiberglass is great and cheap. Expensive and exotic insulations don't improve a wall's performance when it's used IN the wall. That link he posted is great, as are the other NRC reports.
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  #13  
Old 05-27-2010, 04:46 PM
Ted White Ted White is offline
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Default Re: Help with sound proofing

I was thinking that perhaps a basic low cost soundproofing wall design might be of interest here. You can build a very well isolated room at a reasonable cost if you follow the following basic, tried and true methodology.

#1 Decouple the framing. This can be done with staggered stud or double stud walls. To decouple the ceiling, consider clips&channel. Resilient Channel (RC-1) attempts to decouple, however there is no industry standard or specification for its construction, so I’d be concerned about using it.

#2 Install absorption in the cavities. This means standard fiberglass R13 in the walls, R19 in the ceiling. Know that there is no data that supports that any other insulation (including the “acoustic” labeled, and recycled cotton) works better. Also, foam (open or closed cell) is superior for thermal, but distinctly worse for acoustic. Use the cheapest fiberglass you can find.

#3 Add mass. Nothing better than standard 5/8” TypeX. Great mass at 70+ pounds a board, and cheap at $7 a sheet. Use two layers. Only mud and tape the final layer.

#4 Consider damping these drywall panels with one of several field-applied damping compounds. Some work better than others, and independent lab data shows you get what you pay for here.

After that, you’d turn your attention to the ventilation, lights and doors. All of these are flanking paths for sound to get out of the formidable room you just built. They can be dealt with fairly easily, but you’ll want to design this in.
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