DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drum Gear > Other Gear

Other Gear Discuss Hardware and all other equipment not covered in the other topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-30-2009, 02:36 AM
trueblue's Avatar
trueblue trueblue is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 15
Default microphone frequency

Hello all
I have been looking at drum microphones kits on the internet, and a lot of them have a frequency range, is this something i should be considering when making my choise?
if so what should i be looking for?

here is an example for the bass mic
Type : Dynamic Microphone
Polar Pattern : Super Cardioid
Frequency Response : 50~16000 Hz
Sensitivity : -62 dBV/pa (0.8mv/pa)
Rated Impedance : 200 ohm
Max.SPL : 147 dB (THD<=0.5% 1000 Hz)
Weight : 370g

any help would be great.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-30-2009, 06:04 AM
ermghoti ermghoti is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 649
Default Re: microphone frequency

The information is supplied by the manufacturer, and there's a lot of ways to skin that particular cat, so it's not a good way to compare from brand to brand, really.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-01-2010, 02:17 AM
trueblue's Avatar
trueblue trueblue is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 15
Default Re: microphone frequency

thank you ermghoti. I will keep looking and see what i can find
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-02-2010, 02:41 AM
ermghoti ermghoti is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 649
Default Re: microphone frequency

So, what are you going to be using the mics for? Live or recording, a little of each? What kind of cash can you spend?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-12-2010, 02:02 PM
derrensmiths derrensmiths is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2
Default Re: microphone frequency

Many people consider the ribbon microphone as the most natural sounding of all of the microphones. Ribbon microphones are used on sets for movies and tv. Studios incorporate this type of microphone in their assortment to complement many different of music. The ribbon microphone is a great microphone for recording sound effects.

The ribbon microphone was also known as the velocity microphone and was the last of the four basic microhone types developed, following the dynamic, condensor, and carbon microphones.
The ribbons' natural sound can also be made to sound warm, big, and syrupy (Bing Crosby-like) when placed within two or three feet of the talent (generally, you can't close-talk a ribbon without having a greatly exaggerated bass characteristic). An adequate breath filter in front of the ribbon is also necessary to protect the delicate ribbon (NEVER blow into a ribbon mic) .
77A by RCA is the grandaddy of all the ribbon microphones. The 77A is also the rarest of the ribbons.

44A, 44B/BX
Successor to the 77A, the 44 could be considered a "cost-reduced" version. However, it was this cost reduction that catapulted the 44 to its legendary commercial success. Even today, some fifty years after its introduction, 44's can be found in broadcast and recording studios throughout the world.

The first of the 44 family was the 44A, a large microphone, although considerably smaller than the 77A. It used a large horseshoe magnet around the ribbon and featured a figure-8 pickup pattern.

The slightly larger 44B was introduced in about 1938. It also had a figure-8 pickup pattern. Both the 44B and the BX were bi-directional having figure-8 patterns. Its frequency response extended from 30 cycles to 15,000 cycles.

Within it's case, the 44 was provided with "V" (voice) or "M" (music) jumper positions. When a lead was connected to the terminal marked "V", a choke was connected in parallel with part of the transformer winding, which substantially attenuated the low frequency response.


77B, C, D, DX
The 44 was replaced in the late 40's by a smaller, restyled version: the 77B. Resembling a large capsule, the 77B and its decendents, the 77C, 77D and DX have become the standard microphone icon known throughout the world.
__________________
r4 ds
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-12-2010, 03:50 PM
audiotech
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: microphone frequency

Quote:
Originally Posted by derrensmiths View Post
Many people consider the ribbon microphone as the most natural sounding of all of the microphones. Ribbon microphones are used on sets for movies and tv. Studios incorporate this type of microphone in their assortment to complement many different of music. The ribbon microphone is a great microphone for recording sound effects.

The ribbon microphone was also known as the velocity microphone and was the last of the four basic microhone types developed, following the dynamic, condensor, and carbon microphones.
The ribbons' natural sound can also be made to sound warm, big, and syrupy (Bing Crosby-like) when placed within two or three feet of the talent (generally, you can't close-talk a ribbon without having a greatly exaggerated bass characteristic). An adequate breath filter in front of the ribbon is also necessary to protect the delicate ribbon (NEVER blow into a ribbon mic) .
77A by RCA is the grandaddy of all the ribbon microphones. The 77A is also the rarest of the ribbons.

44A, 44B/BX
Successor to the 77A, the 44 could be considered a "cost-reduced" version. However, it was this cost reduction that catapulted the 44 to its legendary commercial success. Even today, some fifty years after its introduction, 44's can be found in broadcast and recording studios throughout the world.

The first of the 44 family was the 44A, a large microphone, although considerably smaller than the 77A. It used a large horseshoe magnet around the ribbon and featured a figure-8 pickup pattern.

The slightly larger 44B was introduced in about 1938. It also had a figure-8 pickup pattern. Both the 44B and the BX were bi-directional having figure-8 patterns. Its frequency response extended from 30 cycles to 15,000 cycles.

Within it's case, the 44 was provided with "V" (voice) or "M" (music) jumper positions. When a lead was connected to the terminal marked "V", a choke was connected in parallel with part of the transformer winding, which substantially attenuated the low frequency response.


77B, C, D, DX
The 44 was replaced in the late 40's by a smaller, restyled version: the 77B. Resembling a large capsule, the 77B and its decendents, the 77C, 77D and DX have become the standard microphone icon known throughout the world.
Most of this is fairly accurate, but very dated material. Where did you copy it from? The most widely used microphones on movie sets and TV is now the "condenser" microphone and it's probably been this way for more than twenty five years. From the Sennheiser 416 or 816 for movie dialogue to the tiny Sony ECM 55's, Tram and Sennheiser hiddable condenser wired and bodypacks for TV and also movie use. The last ribbon microphone that I saw on the "foley stage" to record sound effects was probably in the late sixties. As of this date (2010), ribbon microphones have been in use in broadcast and recording for close to 80 years, but because of their delicate nature, they more or less take a back seat to other more impervious microphones. In the late sixties and early seventies I worked as a disc jockey and studio maintenance engineer at a radio station in Pennsylvania. The announcers would work into an RCA "Bantam" Velocity microphone, type KB-2C. It seemed like every other month we where sending one back to RCA for a ribbon replacement because the announcers would work too close to the microphone and their breath pops would stretch the ribbons.

BTW, I own several of the old RCA classics.

Like I said, valuable information, but when you copy something verbatim, please check the dates or at least publish the original article's date.

Dennis

Last edited by audiotech; 01-12-2010 at 06:26 PM. Reason: spelling and additional information
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-13-2010, 05:02 AM
ermghoti ermghoti is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 649
Default Re: microphone frequency

Yup. Although, Shure bought Crowley-Tripp and are mass-manufacturing their excellent-sounding mic, which features a near-bulletproof polymer ribbon. Hopefully, the technology will trickle down to the copycats, and a decent version will be available at the typical prosumer price points in a couple of years.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com