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  #1  
Old 10-14-2009, 01:40 AM
MadJazz MadJazz is offline
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Default Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

You know these:
http://images.static.steveweissmusic...MF-1008-00.jpg

They muffle the kick enough so you don't need a pillow. By keeping the kick empty, you don't lose volume. At least my empty kick with emad sounds like a cannon. So far so good.

Thing is, these foam rings fit into a plastic tray that makes direct contact with the bearing edges. Basically, it prevents the head from touching the shell. Are these rings actually worth putting on pro kicks? Do they reduce the kick to a generic sound, similar to an entry level kick?

Does emad suffer the same? If so, I don't see the point in investing in an expensive kick when it will sound similar to something much cheaper. The downside of emad is that the ring comes loose - I had to paste it with tape - and that makes me look into the old fashioned powerstroke3 with foam muffle.
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:36 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
If so, I don't see the point in investing in an expensive kick when it will sound similar to something much cheaper.
That, in and of itself, is a great question. When I see all these cats with $800 kick drums padded, muffled, and stuffed.....what's the point. Other than the kick matches the rest of the set, which hopefully is not in "full" bondage. But "to each, his own". Yeah, my thoughts are you can make "any" $800 kick drum sound like a $100 kick, with enough muffling added. The inverse is not true. The $100 kick will not usually compete "wide open" with a $800 kick.
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:42 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by harryconway View Post
That, in and of itself, is a great question. When I see all these cats with $800 kick drums padded, muffled, and stuffed.....what's the point. Other than the kick matches the rest of the set, which hopefully is not in "full" bondage. But "to each, his own". Yeah, my thoughts are you can make "any" $800 kick drum sound like a $100 kick, with enough muffling added. The inverse is not true. The $100 kick will not usually compete "wide open" with a $800 kick.
Because sometimes a gig or a studio session requires such muffling. Its not at the demand of a crappy soundman either. I have had engineers or artists I'm doing a session for request a more muffled kick that is quick and tame. Fair enough, its his song, its what he wants. Who am I to argue and say my kick sounds better empty?

Too many of us preach open kicks, unmuffled snares and toms. Sometimes the job just doesn't require such techniques.
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:47 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

They're not redundant...they're totally unnecessary! *Usually* when people fork out big money for a kick, they're not looking for the sound produced by a beginner kit with a muffle ring. While that sound might almost sound like the overly-produced kick sound you hear on an album, if you try to play that same kick with an ensemble, you'll lose the sound of the kick in an instant, because you're muffling all the sound and life out of it.

As for me, I don't put any huge amount of muffling in my drums. There's the occasional EMAD that my DW might sport, and the felt strips on my Ludwig bass drum, but those are intended to get specific sounds for specific gigs, and those drums still SING!

Those muffle rings don't sound anything like an EMAD, in my opinion...
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:54 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
Because sometimes a gig or a studio session requires such muffling. Its not at the demand of a crappy soundman either. I have had engineers or artists I'm doing a session for request a more muffled kick that is quick and tame. Fair enough, its his song, its what he wants. Who am I to argue and say my kick sounds better empty?

Too many of us preach open kicks, unmuffled snares and toms. Sometimes the job just doesn't require such techniques.
I don't find myself situations where I need to muffle my drums. Maybe that's just me, though. Recording engineers that I work with know that the full tone of a drum comes from an untreated drum, and if they want a tighter sound, they put a compressor/gate on the signal. My drum still sounds full and big, just tighter. The most I've had to do to treat my bass drum in a session was toss a small towel between the head and my pedal, and detune the reso head a little. It gave a "slappy" sound that I, personally, wasn't too pleased with, but as you say: if the producer or engineer wants it...
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Old 10-14-2009, 03:07 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

I tried the Remo Muffle rings once, Just once! That is all that I have to say about them! It's an SK II or nothing for me on the batter! I don't stuff or use anything on the reso either. Let the sound guy sort it out, That's his job! I had an engineer say to me once, " There is to much ring on the bass" I said, "Fix it" He did, and all was fine with the world! I think that these guys get lazy and they look for an easy way out from time to time. I don't want my bass to sound like a 60s recording!
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Old 10-14-2009, 04:05 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

If you need to really dampen I'd go with the pre-damped head - Superkick if you need that more muffled sound, Powerstroke for a more modern sound, double ply with a felt strip for its vibe, wide open, etc etc. IMO the higher end drums sound better clean (as said elsewhere) but still sound good when treated with muffling.

What's right? Again, I say, what's right for the song? If I need to take the front head off my kick, lay a packing blanket in and put an RE20 a few inches in front of the drum, I'll do it. It's just music.

Or as has been said elsewhere: you can reduce resonance, but not add it. I would imagine the muff'ls are gonna just pancake against the head and give you an indistinct dead flap even on a nicer drum. If that's the sound you want (... ?) then no need to buy a nicer kit.
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:06 AM
MadJazz MadJazz is offline
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

First of all, I don't like a kick wide open. It needs to be tight and deep. I don't see how you can achieve that fat tone without some muffling. I don't stuff my drums with pilows but a P3 sounds open without any muffling. Instead of adding a small pillow that will also lower the volume, I was thinking about that foam ring. The other option is an emad but like I said, the ring comes loose. The emad I have now on the 22 kick sounds huge and doesn't need extra muffling.
Then there's also the possibility of a heavily coated batter but I've never tried that.

Secondly, a kick doesn't cost 800$ here, it costs 1500, that's three times as much. I'm talking about a 20" Yamaha absolute. I need to know whether ordering it is worth it.
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Old 10-14-2009, 12:51 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
Secondly, a kick doesn't cost 800$ here, it costs 1500, that's three times as much. I'm talking about a 20" Yamaha absolute. I need to know whether ordering it is worth it.
You wanna take a $2400 drum, and muffle it to the point where it sounds like a typical Guitar Center floor demo kick. No, it's not worth it. I bought a Yamaha 20x14 marching bass of eBay, mounted Gretsch spurs on it, and put Powerstroke 3 heads on both ends, for under $200 total, and probably got a sound close to what your looking for.
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  #10  
Old 10-14-2009, 03:45 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
You know these:
http://images.static.steveweissmusic...MF-1008-00.jpg

They muffle the kick enough so you don't need a pillow. By keeping the kick empty, you don't lose volume. At least my empty kick with emad sounds like a cannon. So far so good.

Thing is, these foam rings fit into a plastic tray that makes direct contact with the bearing edges. Basically, it prevents the head from touching the shell. Are these rings actually worth putting on pro kicks? Do they reduce the kick to a generic sound, similar to an entry level kick?

Does emad suffer the same? If so, I don't see the point in investing in an expensive kick when it will sound similar to something much cheaper. The downside of emad is that the ring comes loose - I had to paste it with tape - and that makes me look into the old fashioned powerstroke3 with foam muffle.

Those are way over kill for muffling a kick drum for anything other triggering.

PS3's fron and back and an Evans EQ pad would be plenty for most applications
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  #11  
Old 10-14-2009, 05:17 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
First of all, I don't like a kick wide open. It needs to be tight and deep. I don't see how you can achieve that fat tone without some muffling.
Hmm...maybe get yourself a used CB 700 kit and a muffle ring then. Seriously...if THAT is the sound you're going for, then there's no reason to pass that much salad for an expensive kick. Your drum might sound tight and fat, sure, but chances are it won't cut through a group that well. Just sayin'...

So, I think you just answered your question for your case. If you can achieve that sound you're looking for inexpensively, there's no technical reason to spend the big bucks on a kit.
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  #12  
Old 10-14-2009, 05:50 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

The only things that alter my bass drum sounds are the Evans EQ4 batter head, some creative tuning and the type of beater I use. I'm using the same batter heads on my 22" bass drums as I do on my 20" bass. I've tried other heads such as the Emad and Emad 2, including some Remo kick heads, but went back to the EQ4. When I get the batter head tuned to where I like it, a lot can be done with the resonant head to fine tune my sound. JAW gives me the boom in your face sound, where a slightly tighter head will give me a more punchy bop sound. A lot depends on the bass drum I'm using too.

Dennis
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  #13  
Old 10-14-2009, 07:11 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

Just to add another angle to this thread, I carried out a side by side comparison a few weeks ago. My son plays a Pearl Vision maple kick & I play the same size Spaun Maple kick. He wanted to use the same heads as mine so we equipped his kick accordingly with an Evans Emad + small ring. Both kicks tuned exactly the same on batter & reso. The difference in depth and volume was very significant. Under such conditions, I can only conclude that the superior shell was responsible for the difference. The Spaun was tight, punchy & deep but with enough sustain to offer true bass. The Pearl offered a similar sound profile but with far less depth & volume.

I think a higher quality shell is worth the difference in cost but only if you're going to tune it correctly and not dampen the hell out of it.
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Old 10-14-2009, 07:26 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by harryconway View Post
That, in and of itself, is a great question. When I see all these cats with $800 kick drums padded, muffled, and stuffed.....what's the point. Other than the kick matches the rest of the set, which hopefully is not in "full" bondage. But "to each, his own". Yeah, my thoughts are you can make "any" $800 kick drum sound like a $100 kick, with enough muffling added. The inverse is not true. The $100 kick will not usually compete "wide open" with a $800 kick.
I agree. I see people stuff pillows, mattresses and refrigerators in their drums in a desperate attempt to destroy their sound. And it works!

I have exceptionally resonant drums, making them troublesome to tune. I have found all the control I need by using thick drum heads and careful tuning. The more resonant the drum, the thicker the head should be.
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:00 PM
MadJazz MadJazz is offline
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by TheArchitect View Post
Those are way over kill for muffling a kick drum for anything other triggering.
Isn't emad just the same thing?


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PS3's fron and back and an Evans EQ pad would be plenty for most applications
That sounds reasonable.
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:03 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by keep it simple View Post
Just to add another angle to this thread, I carried out a side by side comparison a few weeks ago. My son plays a Pearl Vision maple kick & I play the same size Spaun Maple kick. He wanted to use the same heads as mine so we equipped his kick accordingly with an Evans Emad + small ring. Both kicks tuned exactly the same on batter & reso. The difference in depth and volume was very significant. Under such conditions, I can only conclude that the superior shell was responsible for the difference. The Spaun was tight, punchy & deep but with enough sustain to offer true bass. The Pearl offered a similar sound profile but with far less depth & volume.
That's what I was thinking too: cheap drums sound thin and a pro kick will sound fuller even when muffled. I'm glad you confirmed my thoughts. Still, 1500 euro for just one kick is steep. I don't think I'll be able to negotiate a better price.

Quote:
I think a higher quality shell is worth the difference in cost but only if you're going to tune it correctly and not dampen the hell out of it.
Isn't emad equal to "dampening the hell out of it"?
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:08 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

The replies in this thread are hilarious. Too many damn snobs that obviously don't work enough to understand that muffling is okay. Its not always about super resonant drums that sustain for 10 minutes. Until they get some pro work, they will never understand.
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:17 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
The replies in this thread are hilarious. Too many damn snobs that obviously don't work enough to understand that muffling is okay. Its not always about super resonant drums that sustain for 10 minutes. Until they get some pro work, they will never understand.
Please explain your concepts to all of us newbies..

Dennis
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:26 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
Isn't emad equal to "dampening the hell out of it"?
Not in my book. "Dampening" a drum is more like throwing a pillow in it, touching both heads. When you don't get a nice "BOOOOOOM" out of it, you have successfully dampened or muffled or stifled a drum. I can still get a nice full sound out of a drum with an EMAD. Sometimes you need to choke a drum a little, like if you're in a very live room, but mostly you want to preserve as many overtones of the drum as you can, in my opinion and experience.


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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
The replies in this thread are hilarious. Too many damn snobs that obviously don't work enough to understand that muffling is okay. Its not always about super resonant drums that sustain for 10 minutes. Until they get some pro work, they will never understand.

Hmm...sounds like one more drum snob! Welcome to the forum! I look forward to hearing about your "pro work" where you are called upon to completely fill your drum with 10 pillows. :D
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:28 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by TheArchitect View Post
PS3's fron and back and an Evans EQ pad would be plenty for most applications
I'll back this.
I play a PS3 batter and factory ddrum reso with a piece of studio foam cut to 18" (depth of my kick drum) that barely touches each head and it's perfect.
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Old 10-15-2009, 03:22 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
The replies in this thread are hilarious. Too many damn snobs that obviously don't work enough to understand that muffling is okay. Its not always about super resonant drums that sustain for 10 minutes. Until they get some pro work, they will never understand.
Well, I don't think the OP has indicated his intentions to do "any studio work", and if that's the case, he's hopefully gonna get a lot of it, to be able to justify laying out of pocket $2400 for a kick drum. Most cats in Los Angeles would contact Ross Garfield and the Drum Doctors http://www.drumdoctors.com/blogger.html or a similar cartage, and rent the appropriate kick for the job, if they didn't have one. That's gonna cost "way less" than $2400. And a lot of the time, the producer is gonna pay for equipment rental. Your remark about "drums that sustain for 10 minutes", could that also qualify as a "hilarious". Really....10 minutes of sustain. In my 43 years of drumming, I've never seen/heard a drum sustain for that long. That said, MJ plays a beautiful Yamaha kit (see picture). And he's a big boy. And he's gonna spend his money any way he wants to. And if $2400 spent on a 20" Absolute is gonna make him happy, that's fine. But the way it seems like he wants to set it up, and to "again" answer his question, I don't think spending that kind of cash is necessary. For 1/6 the price, he could get that "generic" thump. I did it for 1/12th the cost. And used a Yamaha shell, to boot.
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  #22  
Old 10-15-2009, 04:19 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Isn't emad just the same thing?
No, the Remo foam rings are a lot more extreme. They have a try holding the foam against the head with some pressure, not just attached to the head
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  #23  
Old 10-15-2009, 04:30 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
You know these:
http://images.static.steveweissmusic...MF-1008-00.jpg

They muffle the kick enough so you don't need a pillow. By keeping the kick empty, you don't lose volume. At least my empty kick with emad sounds like a cannon. So far so good.

Thing is, these foam rings fit into a plastic tray that makes direct contact with the bearing edges. Basically, it prevents the head from touching the shell. Are these rings actually worth putting on pro kicks? Do they reduce the kick to a generic sound, similar to an entry level kick?

.
I think those work great for getting a good bass drum sound quickly without a lot of fuss.
When I was working in drums shops year and years ago, we put one in every kick on the floor.

However, there are better options now that have come out since those rings were 1st invented.

The Aquarian Super Kick series (I'm partial to the Super Kick II), the Remo P3, and similar heads are capable of getting a good "muffled" sound without impairing the bearing edge, or overly muffling the drum like large pillows can.

I've never been much of a fan of stuffing a bass drum full of pillows.

However, musical context will play into the situation. What one needs for a jazz gig vs a funk gig vs a metal gig could all warrant different muffling techniques.

-----

A funny (true) story about those muffle rings is once someone came into the shop with a piccolo snare drum to trade it, because he hated the sound it made. OK, fine. I turned the drum over, and realized he had installed a muffle ring on not only the top head, but the bottom head of the snare drum as well. Oh my, no wonder he didn't like the sound.

He didn't care for my suggestion for simply remove the rings, and traded the drum in for another drum that wasn't muffled. Go figure!

Last edited by DrumEatDrum; 10-15-2009 at 06:24 AM.
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Old 10-15-2009, 04:33 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by DrumEatDrum View Post
I think those work great for getting a good bass drum sound quickly without a lot of fuss.
Went I was working in drums shops year and years ago, we put one in every kick on the floor.

However, there are better options now that have come out since those rings were 1st invented.

The Aquarian Super Kick series (I'm partial to the Super Kick II), the Remo P3, and similar heads are capable of getting a good "muffled" sound without impairing the bearing edge, or overly muffling the drum like large pillows can.

I've never been much of a fan of stuffing a bass drum full of pillows.

However, musical context will play into the situation. What one needs for a jazz gig vs a funk gig vs a metal gig could all warrant different muffling techniques.

-----

A funny (true) story about those muffle rings is once someone came into the shop with a piccolo snare drum to trade it, because he hated the sound it made. OK, fine. I turned the drum over, and realized he had installed a muffle ring on not only the top head, but the bottom head of the snare drum as well. Oh my, no wonder he didn't like the sound.

He didn't care for my suggestion for simply remove the rings, and traded the drum in for another drum that wasn't muffled. Go figure!
totally agree! Also, I love the snare story! LOL many times!
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Old 10-15-2009, 12:19 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by caddywumpus View Post
Not in my book. "Dampening" a drum is more like throwing a pillow in it, touching both heads. When you don't get a nice "BOOOOOOM" out of it, you have successfully dampened or muffled or stifled a drum. I can still get a nice full sound out of a drum with an EMAD. Sometimes you need to choke a drum a little, like if you're in a very live room, but mostly you want to preserve as many overtones of the drum as you can, in my opinion and experience.
Perfect reply caddy. I get more than enough true bass from my kick whilst keeping it controlled enough for mic applications. I only use the thin foam ring. Everything else is tuning. I take the ring out and change the reso for one without a port for acoustic work.
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  #26  
Old 10-15-2009, 11:16 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
The replies in this thread are hilarious. Too many damn snobs that obviously don't work enough to understand that muffling is okay. Its not always about super resonant drums that sustain for 10 minutes. Until they get some pro work, they will never understand.
I like your style :)

Harryconway, no reason to get upset. Drums prices are unfortunately absurd in Europe and I think it's not worth the money just to have a smaller kick. I'm asking about these heads because they aren't cheap and I don't want to throw away money.

I'll just stick to the emad for now. Since I got this head, the kick sounds huge with some sustain. It's empty inside. In the past I have used those foam rings on a P3, long time ago, and the kick sounded better with them than without. It's just been too long ago to remember exactly how it was like. The only downside of the emad is that the ring keeps coming off and I had to paste it with tape. This got me thinking of getting back to the old fashioned P3 with evans pillow (which isn't the same as stuffing the drum!). Or replace the reso by a remad, that might do it as well.

Thanks to everyone for contributing.
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  #27  
Old 10-17-2009, 12:55 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

Apart from matters of sheer taste, the answers are not so simple.

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Originally Posted by PureRockFury View Post
Because sometimes a gig or a studio session requires such muffling. Its not at the demand of a crappy soundman either. I have had engineers or artists I'm doing a session for request a more muffled kick that is quick and tame. Fair enough, its his song, its what he wants. Who am I to argue and say my kick sounds better empty?

Too many of us preach open kicks, unmuffled snares and toms. Sometimes the job just doesn't require such techniques.
Much truth here. I will say that I've noticed that more sound guys--both live and in the studio--are open to a more resonant sound these days, but you're doing a job and you're not in charge of tone.

However: many drummers don't realize the difference in requirements for miked vs. unmiked. When you're miked you can expect to be using some muffling, or premuffled heads, a port in the reso, and JAW tuning.

But I see many drummers playing a bass drum set up like this in the live unmiked situation, too. Sounds perfectly fine from the driver's seat, but I bet most of them don't know that their bass drums are nearly inaudible.

For unmiked you definitely need sustain--it's what gets you heard. You hear the sustain at the kit but the audience doesn't--they just hear a louder bass drum.

My setup for unmiked is PS3s front and rear, no port, and nothing in the drum. Reso tuned up above JAW a little, up to where it begins to sustain. Batter tuned a smidge higher.

I would never expect that setup to work well under the mikes, either live or (especially) in the studio. But if you're playing out unmiked, no one will hear your bass drum otherwise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadJazz View Post
You know these:
http://images.static.steveweissmusic...MF-1008-00.jpg

They muffle the kick enough so you don't need a pillow. By keeping the kick empty, you don't lose volume. At least my empty kick with emad sounds like a cannon. So far so good.
Well, no. Muffling = softer. That's why they call it muffling. Doesn't matter if the muffling is a futon in the drum or foam sticking to the head. It will sound different than with a pillow, but it will cut volume all the same.

That's not an issue when miked, obviously.

The point is (as PRF alluded to), different situations call for different approaches to muffling and tuning. There is no one-size-fits-all solution. You can be a purist all you like in the practice room, but when you're on a gig you need to give what your employer wants.

I play unmiked all the time, while the kid plays mostly unmiked, but not always. If we're not sure about whether the drums will be miked we take two resos to the gig, one ported and the other unported, along with an Evans EQ pad and a rolled-up towel for muffling. A little tweaking of the tuning and you have one drum for both sounds.

Quote:
that makes me look into the old fashioned powerstroke3 with foam muffle.
Just FYI, the PS3 has no foam ring, just a "control" ring of head material around the perimeter.

Finally, after all these years, I still like the sound of felt strips for muffling. They are adjustable in effect and fully removable. Win-win.
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  #28  
Old 10-17-2009, 03:37 AM
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Deathmetalconga Deathmetalconga is offline
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

If sound men ruled the world, they would just have us play on cardboard boxes and attach triggers. It would make their jobs much easier.

Failing that, they can get dummers to stuff furniture into their bass drums and kill all sound, making them sound like a dead cardboard box, which the sound man can then make into any other sound he wants or needs.
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Old 10-17-2009, 02:18 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

Quote:
Originally Posted by drumtechdad View Post
However: many drummers don't realize the difference in requirements for miked vs. unmiked. When you're miked you can expect to be using some muffling, or premuffled heads, a port in the reso, and JAW tuning.

Agree with everything but the JAW tuning, particularly in the studio. JAW tuning with a PS3 for example puts the pitch of the drum way down in the sub region where its difficult to make it speak in the mix.

Unless there is a very specific sound trying to be achieved, some level of muffling will always be needed in the studio. Studio playing is not the "black art" some would have you believe but it does have different requirements than live
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Old 10-17-2009, 03:57 PM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

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Originally Posted by TheArchitect View Post
Agree with everything but the JAW tuning, particularly in the studio. JAW tuning with a PS3 for example puts the pitch of the drum way down in the sub region where its difficult to make it speak in the mix.

Unless there is a very specific sound trying to be achieved, some level of muffling will always be needed in the studio. Studio playing is not the "black art" some would have you believe but it does have different requirements than live
I'm sorry, I did not mean to imply that PS3s ought to be tuned at JAW, just that JAW was a common tuning for studio and live/miked work.

As a longtime user of PS3s I know that they do not sound their best at JAW, but need to be a little higher to really sound good. I have, however, used ported PS3 resos at JAW when miked to good effect, so long as the batter is a bit higher.
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Old 10-19-2009, 03:53 AM
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Default Re: Foam muffle rings redundant on quality kicks?

I'm going to start using the foam strips used on marching bass drums. It goes inside just on the edge and dampens the head without interfering with the tuning of the heads or the airflow inside the drum. I love an open sound for jazz, but it just doesn't fit all styles and venues. Pillows absorb all the sound of the shell whether or not they press into the heads for dampening.
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