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  #41  
Old 02-11-2009, 06:27 AM
Mystic
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

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Originally Posted by timmdrum View Post
I think I get it... you're saying "I won't choose Evans heads solely on the fact that they're named Evans", right? Not "Because they're named Evans, I refuse to try them." That would be saying you rule them out because you don't like the name Evans.

Incidentally, my last name's Evans, but that has no bearing on my reply, nor of my choice of heads. I've actually used Remo more but I've liked some Evans heads. I'm still trying to wrap my head around the G-Plus (single 12 mil) and EC-1 (single 14 mil!)... Everyone I've asked is saying that the G-Plus heads sound more dead & tubby than the EC-1's, which are thicker...?!? I think I need to hear a pair of identical toms each with 1 of these heads, tuned identically, and hear for myself. Evans needs to get some sound samples up on their website!!
The thing is, I don't refuse to use them if I have to, but I refuse to buy them, so in a sense I guess I would be ruling them out of the money factor, but I would still use them if they were the only head I had handy or if I was playing someones kit. Nothing against the name in particular it just doesn't appeal or sound as sharp to my ear as say Remo or Aquarian, I like Evans I just don't care to buy the name, its a weird thing I suffer from, I am slowly getting over my namophobia lol, I started by buying a Meinl stick bag instead of pro mark, yay everyone clap lol. Don't take offense to my choice I am just trying to figure out in my mind how to get over the fact that name doesn't matter, well it does to an extent (i.e. buy a quality name) but it is a lot easier to buy from someone you trust than someone you have never bought from before, see what I'm getting at or am I just ranting? lol anyway

About your question on the heads though, just buy 1 of each for 1 size tom and test them both out on the same tom, and sound clips would be cool, but people would probably get confused and say stuff along the lines of "why don't my drums sound like these when I use those heads" and the reason would be, because they are on different wood shells than yours, but it would still be cool to be able to use them as a reference to each other. Good feedback guys :D keep the comments and questions rolling in.

Last edited by Mystic; 02-11-2009 at 04:53 PM.
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  #42  
Old 02-18-2009, 05:43 PM
Christ-Hammer
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

I have been switching between 1 and 2 ply heads, but I can't figure out what I like more. It seems like when I use single ply it's harder to get a nice tone, but you get more volume and a brighter sound. With 2 ply it seems like you sacrifice volume for a pre made sound that the manufacturer made, but I have this thing in my head telling me that using 2 ply is wrong and I should let the drums open up with single ply after watching Danny Carey's Lateralus video.
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  #43  
Old 02-19-2009, 04:42 AM
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topgun2021 topgun2021 is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

I use a Evans st dry snare head, it took me a week to tune it, but it turned out so nice!

I also tune to resonance, none of that tune to a note because:

1) I have no clue how to

2) I don't see how that does anything.
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  #44  
Old 02-19-2009, 07:04 AM
Christ-Hammer
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Well I kind of trust the tone tuning fact. I watched a Bob Gatzen video about it and he demonstrated it. I think you can come up with some interesting tones with that idea, but I could be wrong.
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  #45  
Old 02-19-2009, 12:07 PM
legobeast legobeast is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Pure entertainment!

This thread is far out, man!

So educational, yet so entertaining at the same time.

I particularly enjoyed the 'Evans' debate. It reminded me a lot of my own concerns.

Although so many people rave about the value of "Moongel", I just can't bring myself to try it out, even though I am sure I could use some. It's the "Moon" bit that freaks me out. I'm scared of far-off places. Do they sell anything similar called "Earthgel". I could cope with that!
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  #46  
Old 02-20-2009, 06:52 AM
Christ-Hammer
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Well I have Moongels and I would say they are definitely worth the money, but I still like the sound of rings more. Even the fact that you don't like the name, with $5 or so you can get a set of 4 of them and they are one of the best ways to dampen, so try them out when you got some extra pocket change. Anyway I am down to the point to where if I buy a head I don't care what name is on it, if it makes a decent sound I don't care lol.
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  #47  
Old 03-11-2009, 04:49 AM
SGT_Drummer SGT_Drummer is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

the only tip i could throw in here would be an old trick i used to do to cut back on over-resonance. (yes, they can ring TOO much)

the answer is DUCK TAPE!! (proof positive that yes! duck tape can fix anything) i would only use them on batter heads. I would take the reso heads off, do a quick tune on the batter, then apply a few SMALL strips of duck tape. they have to be very small other wise you lose ALL resonance. then i would put the reso head back on, tune to desired sound/pitch/tone/whatever, then proceed to give the batter head a final tuning. it worked nicely but was very time consuming so i quit doing it after awhile.

this method also increases head longetivity. i had to replace my snare head about 2 years after i started playing, on the head i got to replace it i applied the duck tape method. 14 years later when i passed that snare down to my sister it still had the same head on it, and it still sounded good. it definitely did not sound new, but it did sound good. 14" remo coated weatherking if anyone was curious.


also, if you break cymbals, try stacking the broken ones. very interesting sounds can be achieved. or there is a guy in joliet, IL that fixes them. by fixes i mean he cuts out all the broken parts so they are still useable. they have a different sound after which makes for a very unique overall sound.
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  #48  
Old 03-11-2009, 04:58 PM
Christ-Hammer
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Quote:
Originally Posted by topgun2021 View Post
I use a Evans st dry snare head, it took me a week to tune it, but it turned out so nice!

I also tune to resonance, none of that tune to a note because:

1) I have no clue how to

2) I don't see how that does anything.
Well after some experimenting I found out that tuning to the note actually works, and like you said you tune to resonance, you are still tuning to a note. Every sound the resonance makes is a note, but the trick is to listen to each head individually and compare it to another instrument if that makes sense. Like I used a tuned guitar for this one, and I noticed the incident when I was tuning my guitar to drop d comparing it to the d string it made a similar sound to the problems we have with drum resonance. As I was tuning it, it made a wavy sound and it got less wavy as I got closer to the note, so this helped me a lot with tuning my drums to make a sweet resonating sound. Fact proven,
Thanks Mystic and Bob Gatzen
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  #49  
Old 03-11-2009, 05:01 PM
Christ-Hammer
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Quote:
Originally Posted by SGT_Drummer View Post
the only tip i could throw in here would be an old trick i used to do to cut back on over-resonance. (yes, they can ring TOO much)

the answer is DUCK TAPE!! (proof positive that yes! duck tape can fix anything) i would only use them on batter heads. I would take the reso heads off, do a quick tune on the batter, then apply a few SMALL strips of duck tape. they have to be very small other wise you lose ALL resonance. then i would put the reso head back on, tune to desired sound/pitch/tone/whatever, then proceed to give the batter head a final tuning. it worked nicely but was very time consuming so i quit doing it after awhile.

this method also increases head longetivity. i had to replace my snare head about 2 years after i started playing, on the head i got to replace it i applied the duck tape method. 14 years later when i passed that snare down to my sister it still had the same head on it, and it still sounded good. it definitely did not sound new, but it did sound good. 14" remo coated weatherking if anyone was curious.


also, if you break cymbals, try stacking the broken ones. very interesting sounds can be achieved. or there is a guy in joliet, IL that fixes them. by fixes i mean he cuts out all the broken parts so they are still useable. they have a different sound after which makes for a very unique overall sound.
I discovered that too much resonance is due to poor tuning, no need for duct tape. When you get the batter and reso tuned to the same note or an octave higher/lower w/e you want, it will reduce bad overtones and it will give it a much nicer sound. I realize now after some drumming experience that resonance is actually a drummers best friend. The only time I would use any form of dampening now is to dampen a really low end set, there are certain kits out there that just sound bad on their own and dampening will make them sound quite a bit better, but it will never do a drummer justice to dampen a high end kit unless they are miced up.

Last edited by Christ-Hammer; 03-12-2009 at 06:37 AM.
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  #50  
Old 03-11-2009, 08:58 PM
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veggo32 veggo32 is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

If you have some cymbal felts lying around (I don't do this myself but I've tried it and it works) cut a thin piece of duct tape and put 1/3 of it on the felt and then tape to the drum hoop so it holds the felt on the head. When you hit the head the felt will jump up allowing the head to do its thing, when the felt returns to the head it will stop the ring. You can experiment by taping the felt so its further or closer to the hoop, also you can try different size felts depending on how dampened you want it.
I saw this on a Russ Miller Dvd.
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  #51  
Old 03-12-2009, 06:31 AM
SGT_Drummer SGT_Drummer is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christ-Hammer View Post
I discovered that too much resonance is due to poor tuning, no need for duct tape. When you get the batter and reso tuned to the same not or an octave higher/lower w/e you want, it will reduce bad overtones and it will give it a much nicer sound. I realize now after some drumming experience that resonance is actually a drummers best friend. The only time I would use any form of dampening now is to dampen a really low end set, there are certain kits out there that just sound bad on their own and dampening will make them sound quite a bit better, but it will never do a drummer justice to dampen a high end kit unless they are miced up.
yeah the set I primarily used this technique on was VERY low end. I won't do it on my new set, and the primary reason i stopped do this was because i learned how to tune properly lol.
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  #52  
Old 10-05-2009, 10:23 PM
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Music is Awesome Music is Awesome is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Anyone know what heads i would need to get my toms to sound like this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae1tBkA2ZB8
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  #53  
Old 10-06-2009, 10:22 PM
MadJazz MadJazz is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Making your kit sound good.

How?

One word: Powerstroke3

This head is great all-round, for snare, kick and toms. It's the most popular head for kick and often seen on snares but few people have thought of trying it with toms. At the same time they wonder how to eliminate overring without killing sustain. That's exactly what PS3 does!

Instead of messing with 2 ply heads and adding moongel, try this one. It also keeps the good stick rebound of a 1 ply.
Just don't take a coated version for toms, unless you like your floor tom to have a bright stick attack.

Don't get fooled, this head is not the same as an ambassador with O-ring. The O-ring is much thicker and more intrusive than on PS3. The difference between amb with O-ring and PS3 is night and day.

I'm still waiting for a diplomat weight PS3. This would be the ideal head for 8-10" toms.
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  #54  
Old 10-06-2009, 11:36 PM
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Abel Abel is offline
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Default Re: Making your kit sound good

Bob Gatzen has some great tips. I also consult the Drum Tuning Bible.

http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/index.html
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