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  #481  
Old 09-16-2008, 03:28 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Today I bought Hemispheres so I now own it on CD. I was grocery shopping and saw it in the CD bin for $6.99; I knew it had my name on it. I've gotten a lot of classic rock CD's at the grocery store, it's always a real deal.

I remember the Hemispheres tour because it was the last progressive rock tour that Rush did at the time. People actually sat and listened to the music. Then after Permanent Waves, you got all these kids going who would have been better off at a Judas Priest concert. Those are the loyal legions that will follow the band regardless of what they do. It is smart to cater to your fan base. I saw the the Snakes and Arrows tour; it seems to be more like I remember from back in the day. People actually listening to the music. I guess all those kids grew up.

At the time of Hemispheres, there was the developing idea of Science Fiction Rock, and people thought it was going to be the next big thing. It went back to Yes, Starship Trooper and ELP's Tarkus . But it never really took off. Fantasy is a big part of Heavy Metal. But Heavy Metal seems to be too centered on Religious themes, or a-religions themes. I guess there are albums that would exemplify Science Fiction Rock, like Dream Theater's Metropolis. it kind of mixes both as does Hemispheres or Radiohead's OK Computer or Sail to the Moon.I shouldn't say religion as much as spirituality. I think it is an interesting idea, and I have always enjoyed it. And Hemispheres is really the great work in this genre, that never quite sailed. It's "a little bit Neitzsche, a little bit rock and roll." Did Rush revisit the idea of Science Fiction Rock in their later albums? and who else is doing that these days?
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  #482  
Old 09-16-2008, 05:01 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
Telling someone that a certain drummer doesn't appeal to them, on a thread that's dedicated to said drummer, over and over and over...is insulting.

Demanding to "play nice" should be directed to ALL. Not just to ONE individual.
As long as dissenting opinions are stated maturely and respectfully they are actually allowed here. And my comments were directed at everyone.

Please read the posted rules, especialy the part about commenting on the moderation of the forum. Please stay on subject. Thanks!
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  #483  
Old 09-16-2008, 05:21 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mattsmith View Post
... I want to continue to express my concern for this thought out there that drumming evolves every time it changes.
Isn't that "evolution"? Just because something evolves does not necessarily mean it is made better. The test of time will determine that.

Well written response as usual, Matt. I learn something every time you write. I merely meant "evolution" as a change in "flashy technique" that so many people cling to when determining the worth of a drummer (like how fast you are, for example) and how certain drummers are applying this flashy technique to today's equipment. I just remember being floored by Neil's layered parts and interdependence. Then I saw Bozzio, then Minneman, then Lang and Donati; each of them with greater interdependence and "feet=hands" technique (in my eyes, at least).

Now there can be a giant debate on how this interdependence was already done and how it really isn't music but that would be purely subjective. We could be lead through the history of music and have our hands slapped for irresponsibly slinging terms like "evolve", but the popular vote is for guys like Donati, Lang etc etc as being cutting edge in applying layered drum parts and interdependence to drum technique. The same type of stuff Neil was credited for back in the day (where so much of this "drum god" stuff probably came from in the first place).

So, I take it out of my wallet, and use it again: as drumming evolves, people will say the same negative comments about Donati (again, sorry fanboys and sorry music history buffs and WFD champions).
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  #484  
Old 09-16-2008, 05:25 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mikei View Post
He does look miserable or at least slightly constipated while playing. I always wished that he would "get into it" a bit more.

One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.
Neil does look a little "stern". However, the man has been through more grief than most. Everytime I see him, I think about his past and give him the respect and "props" he deserves.
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  #485  
Old 09-16-2008, 06:00 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Zumba_Zumba View Post
Isn't that "evolution"? Just because something evolves does not necessarily mean it is made better. The test of time will determine that.

Well written response as usual, Matt. I learn something every time you write. I merely meant "evolution" as a change in "flashy technique" that so many people cling to when determining the worth of a drummer (like how fast you are, for example) and how certain drummers are applying this flashy technique to today's equipment. I just remember being floored by Neil's layered parts and interdependence. Then I saw Bozzio, then Minneman, then Lang and Donati; each of them with greater interdependence and "feet=hands" technique (in my eyes, at least).

Now there can be a giant debate on how this interdependence was already done and how it really isn't music but that would be purely subjective. We could be lead through the history of music and have our hands slapped for irresponsibly slinging terms like "evolve", but the popular vote is for guys like Donati, Lang etc etc as being cutting edge in applying layered drum parts and interdependence to drum technique. The same type of stuff Neil was credited for back in the day (where so much of this "drum god" stuff probably came from in the first place).

So, I take it out of my wallet, and use it again: as drumming evolves, people will say the same negative comments about Donati (again, sorry fanboys and sorry music history buffs and WFD champions).
Nice reply as always Zumba, and an example of the civility that can be used by 2 people moving thought in a particular direction so both sides can profit from the exchange.

Regarding the flashiness angle, aren't the interdependence experiments used by Lang and Donati really /at least with the mainstream/ technique exhibitions used at clinics and such in of themselves? I have always taken evolution to include the practical applications of most, if not all drummers. For instance the hi-hat application was a changed everything evolution, as was left hand independence and bass drum space that allowed more creativity for the bass player in jazz. Those things are universal now, while at least as far as I can see, some of what you're talking about is still limited to stuff you pay $10 to see at a music store. Now I'm not saying that might not change later, but for now the jury's out.

Now I'm certainly not against the exploration of certain percussion complexity. In fact one of the things I enjoy doing for fun is playing along with Bozzio's old Zappa records. And even though the Donati and Lang stuff just doesn't do it for me personally, I can still respect what goes into it. But after having the advantage to see drumming in many parts of the world, I've found that so called drumming cultures that are supposed to be primitive, have actually been doing for hundreds of years what we consider new evolution now. So is that true evolution? I just can't see that it is.

As you know you open up another big can of worms when bringing speed into a flashiness debate. The who's the fastest stuff is certainly not cutting edge. In fact it was probably the first thing cavemen drummers pushed along in the beginning of everything. I mean I understand what you mean by popular vote, but who's vote are you counting? There are some Yoruba drummers in Nigeria who would think that was pretty funny, because a lot of what you hear these prog guys doing now is often tips of the hat to what those Yoruban guys have been doing for a long time. And as for the odd meter stuff, there are things going on since the Roman times in Romania and Bulgaria I'd love to get you to hear. And even in the modern sense, get DC Criger to play you some of his Don Ellis stuff.

This original slant if I recall came from some fans believing that Peart invented some of these concepts, which is far from the truth. Now to say he was key to bringing some of those centuries old concepts to Euro American rock and making people more aware of it? Sure why not? But the other stuff reminds me of how people used to think Columbus discovered America, when there were already people everywhere.
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  #486  
Old 09-16-2008, 07:03 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I think that Peart brought to fruition a lot of what was going on in earlier progressive rock drumming, and very rudimentary in regards to what drummers being mentioned are doing today. If anything, progressive rock increased the size of the drum set, especially in the addition of the tom toms. This allowed the drummer to move up from his 12" as well as down from his 12", which Neil did a lot. This brought a greater melodic contour to rock drumming. it's a very simple thing; but very effective if nobody had heard it before. Prog also brought greater technique and the abstraction of the bop drummers to rock music. So a drummer would use a rhythmic theme that could come back throughout a piece. A good example of this is Yes' Heart of the Sunrise. Bruford was influenced by Max.

To say that early prog had any relation to bringing world ideas to the fore such as you would see in Nigeria seems problematic. Playing in 7/8, which Neil did a lot in the day, was par for the course, esp after The Mahavishnu Orchestra brought Indian rhythms to the rock mainstream. Everybody needed to prove they could play in odd meters. Steve Reich was the master at bringing these ideas into percussion music; but his relation to the rock mainstream seems tangential at best. Zappa's experiments came more from the European avant-garde, esp Varese, and Cage. it would be interesting if you see some relation in Zappa to other world music ideas, esp if these were intentional.

Wasn't the opening of the bass drum that the bop drummers did a matter of practicality? As the music increased in speed they couldn't play all fours on the Bass drum. So it had ramifications in opening up the bass and opening up the harmonic implications of the piece; but I don't know that the drummers really had a part in that evolution as much as adapting to it. Please correct me if I am wrong here.

For me, the drum set is an instrument in itself. If Virgil Donati plays something that has no practical implications it doesn't really matter. It's like saying "Bach could play a four part invention on the organ; but that has no practical applications in an oratorio or opera so why do it?" Well, later Mozart did it in an opera.

What I am asking is whether or not these evolutions that happenined on the drum set in its early manifestation affected the music or did the music affect these changes Secondly, now that we see these evolutions happening on the drum set "without a musical outlet,"that is they've happened as an evolution of the instrument itself, does that necessarily discredit them or make them any less musical?
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  #487  
Old 09-16-2008, 07:15 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mattsmith View Post
Regarding the flashiness angle, aren't the interdependence experiments used by Lang and Donati really /at least with the mainstream/ technique exhibitions used at clinics and such in of themselves? I have always taken evolution to include the practical applications of most, if not all drummers. For instance the hi-hat application was a changed everything evolution, as was left hand independence and bass drum space that allowed more creativity for the bass player in jazz. Those things are universal now, while at least as far as I can see, some of what you're talking about is still limited to stuff you pay $10 to see at a music store.
I agree with this, Matt, and I don't at all care for the clinic thing that's sprung up.
BUT. People like that stuff. People can't be put down for wanting to play faster, more complicated, more technical, using more pedals and more drums, any more than people can be blamed for coming to this website. The technology is here and the people who have mastered that technology are eager to share it.
The bulk of all this extreme drumming stuff just won't cut it in the professional music scene, and I think that most savy youngsters are going to figure that out eventually, or they won't be working for very long.
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  #488  
Old 09-16-2008, 01:39 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Oops...


How could I have forgotten?

HAPPY 56th, Neil!!! ;-) (Sept.12, 1952)


And many more!!
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  #489  
Old 09-16-2008, 02:54 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
To say that early prog had any relation to bringing world ideas to the fore such as you would see in Nigeria seems problematic. Playing in 7/8, which Neil did a lot in the day, was par for the course, esp after The Mahavishnu Orchestra brought Indian rhythms to the rock mainstream. Everybody needed to prove they could play in odd meters. Steve Reich was the master at bringing these ideas into percussion music; but his relation to the rock mainstream seems tangential at best. Zappa's experiments came more from the European avant-garde, esp Varese, and Cage. it would be interesting if you see some relation in Zappa to other world music ideas, esp if these were intentional.
But Ken, you might be making my point for me. I agree with all that. I used African drumming as only one specific example. The original discussion stemmed from the idea that Peart may have actually invented some of this, as opposed to uniquely pulling it into his music. What Peart did was a good thing, but neither the music or the concept were newly created or evolutionary. I also don't see why Peart admirers wouldn't be able to see that too while understanding that people appreciate the part of this he did incorporate.After all, how is not intentionally exagerating his accomplishments while bringing up what he actually did contribute disrespect?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
Wasn't the opening of the bass drum that the bop drummers did a matter of practicality? As the music increased in speed they couldn't play all fours on the Bass drum. So it had ramifications in opening up the bass and opening up the harmonic implications of the piece; but I don't know that the drummers really had a part in that evolution as much as adapting to it. Please correct me if I am wrong here.
The opening of the bass drum was probably more a result of string bass evolution in jazz that came from amplification becoming more popular in the 1930s. Remember that those original jazz bands were using tubas until the string bass was able to be heard. From that came more nimble bass players who insisted on a greater piece of the action. Back in the day guys often rode the bass drum because they had to, because either the tuba was dragging, you couldn't hear the string bass, or in the case of the Benny Goodman small bands, they didn't even try to have one. Which brings us to the most copied version of all that///Gene Krupa. Fans copied that style long after it was needed because it was ///well, Gene Krupa. And you think Peart and Bonham fans are intense, go visit the Krupa board sometimes. As far as it being a tempo issue, I don't think so. Some of that KCity jam session stuff before bop was plenty fast.
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  #490  
Old 09-16-2008, 03:18 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Moderator Edit: If you can't contribute to the conversation then please take your sarcasm somewhere else. Thanks!

Last edited by DogBreath; 09-16-2008 at 06:08 PM.
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  #491  
Old 09-16-2008, 04:04 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I think it would be silly to say any of these guys "invented" these styles.....look one of my first heros was Neil Peart....he opened me up to new ideas at the time....and then Bozzio...and then Coliauta...and so on and so on...and the whole thing never ends unless you want it to.

However....all of these guys have their influences which the more you listen and learn the easier they are to hear very clearly...

Peart...had alot of Moon...Bruford etc...
Bozzio...had alot of Tony in his younger years...has alot of everything now... much of his solo material is directly related to different ( to use a very generic term) world drumming and ethnic playing....African Middle East Far East etc....
Coliauta...Tony..Steve...etc..etc...even Stewart Copeland in his playing.

Much of what we all play is originally derived from African drumming...trace it and see....the more I have studied and played african drums the more apparent that is...many of the "new" cool things I heard Bruford doing with King Crimson in the 80s were african.

It is difficult enough to put a 'new shine on an old thing'...and sometimes it does seem there is nothing new under the sun...truly. But that is how I see all drummers ( myself included) as putting a new shine on something...and finding the magic within ourselves...the "create" something new or exciting.

the same could be said for many other disciplines other than music. Much of it has been done ....and later refined.
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  #492  
Old 09-16-2008, 04:25 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

HTML Code:
Originally Posted by mikei  
He does look miserable or at least slightly constipated while playing. I always wished that he would "get into it" a bit more. 

One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.

I think Neil's stern look is a matter of him concentrating on his busy drum parts, not the fact he isn't enjoying himself.

I saw Rush in the early 80s and even then he had this "stern" look.

I play myself in a bar band and people have said to me I look fed-up when I'm playing, when in fact nothing could be further from the truth and I'm merely, concentrating on my part.
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  #493  
Old 09-16-2008, 06:03 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
If you like Snakes and Arrows great.
I picked up snakes and arrows not too long ago, and I must say I like it more then most of their other c.d's. Granted They have a lot of songs I will always love,( Dreamline, Distant Early Warning, tom sawyer, limelight, big money, etc etc) But as a whole I think "Snakes And arrows" is far more cohesive as a band then a lot of their past stuff has been and I like almost every song on it. Just my $0.02.
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  #494  
Old 09-16-2008, 10:31 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Wow.

I guess "invented" was the wrong term too. Perhaps "came up with" would have been better. Maybe not "applied" because I swear I never heard a drum beat like "Mystic Rhythms" or "Time Stand Still" before. Then again I am not as well rounded musically and culturally as some of my fellow posters. Some of you might like "bastardized" or "copped" implying that Neil took from various sources and brought the material to a much larger audience. Who knows, lots of interpretations....

The popular vote would have to come from the massive volume of Lang, Donati, Marco DVD sales and hits on Youtube (disregarding the comments). So I think there are numbers to back up my claim that the popular vote would be for Lang, Donati etc as being cutting edge on four-way interdependence and layered rhythms by a single player.

I like to think of the whole clinic versus real world music application as a car show. There are concepts that are far out but reveal ideas and indicate how far these ideas can go. But apply them to practical use of a mass-produced car and the concept most likely falls apart. However, some of the pieces of these far out concepts do make it into today's every-day cars. I like to think Neil had pieces of these drum concepts and placed them in a musical context that was in fact popular (again millions of records sold can't be wrong). Lang and Donati are sort of these far out concepts that don't necessarily reach the masses like Rush did, but still are reaching drum enthusiasts and showing what can be done with four-way independence. Let me know if anything else is incorrect, I love explaining every detail of my opinion. I'm going to go cry now ;)
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  #495  
Old 09-17-2008, 03:55 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mattsmith View Post
But Ken, you might be making my point for me.

I was agreeing with you. I think there are certain points in the evolution of an art form where what is needed musically is synthesis, guys who bring together what has come before into a cohesive whole. There are other times when innovation is needed.

I have found that often when you discuss historical ideas, even the most widely accepted, with the people who make the history happen, they have no idea what you're talking about. "Oh, was I doing that?" and even if it seems obvious that that is what they were doing, they were not aware of it. It's like asking somebody,' "Why are you a genius?" There isn't any rational basis for it, it is just the way it is for them. :)

As far as extreme drumming, yes it has it's place. But if all you work on is material that you can't apply to a given musical situation, you're wasting your time. It is the guy who can make you melt when he plays a flam, or a simple rock beat that you want to hear. It's kind of ironic, isn't it?
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  #496  
Old 09-17-2008, 05:47 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
As far as extreme drumming, yes it has it's place. But if you can't apply what you know to a given musical situation, you're wasting your time on it. It is the guy who can make you melt when he plays a flam, or a simple rock beat that you want to hear. It's kind of ironic, isn't it?
This is the point I try to get across to students and a common trap with no musical end/purpose as I see it Ken. If we all focus more on how the things we choose to learn/play fit and make sense in an actual musical application/setting/concept we would all be better off in my view. Seperate monster chop fest/clinics and drum playing but with no clear purpose or understanding of how to apply any of it in "real life" musical situations is not doing any developing young player any good in my view in the long run. Just my opinion as as a "musical" drummer and working professional in acoustic jazz music situations.



Case in point:

Last night I had my first rehearsal with a new Big Band I just joined. Nothing that took place in the evening on the bandstand last night had anything to do with pure "all about the drums" killer drum chops per se but had everything to do with the challenge of interpreting and reading each chart and knowing just what to play as a drummer on the spot to best fit with the music and other musicians for each given chart on stage. This is what is important to me and requires some concentration and hard work and a sense of developing musical "ears" from the drummer that goes for me something far beyond seperate from actual performance killer chops at the end of the day but focused on how to use "chops" for setting the way for skills in the actual performance and context of a real band/musical situation.
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  #497  
Old 09-17-2008, 06:37 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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This is the point I try to get across to students and a common trap with no musical end/purpose as I see it Ken. If we all focus more on how the things we choose to learn/play fit and make sense in an actual musical application/setting/concept we would all be better off in my view. Seperate monster chop fest/clinics and drum playing but with no clear purpose or understanding of how to apply any of it in "real life" musical situations is not doing any developing young player any good in my view in the long run. Just my opinion as as a "musical" drummer and working professional in acoustic jazz music situations.



Case in point:

Last night I had my first rehearsal with a new Big Band I just joined. Nothing that took place in the evening on the bandstand last night had anything to do with pure "all about the drums" killer drum chops per se but had everything to do with the challenge of interpreting and reading each chart and knowing just what to play as a drummer on the spot to best fit with the music and other musicians for each given chart on stage. This is what is important to me and requires some concentration and hard work and a sense of developing musical "ears" from the drummer that goes for me something far beyond seperate from actual performance killer chops at the end of the day but focused on how to use "chops" for setting the way for skills in the actual performance and context of a real band/musical situation.
Well, you noticed I change my post after I wrote it. I don't want to say that working on obtuse coordination has no value. But if you don't know chart reading, you need to be working on chart reading. A lot of that superfluous stuff is superfluous stuff; but it can help your drumming, though not if you haven't concentrated on the task at hand.

One of the things that I've been working on over the last year is playing something over and over trying to finder deeper nuances to make it meaningful. I can see this with my students. I know exactly when "Elvis has left the building." And I call them on it. I notice that this attention to detail has helped my playing. I can always tell the exact moment when a musician is thinking about "picking up his laundry." It's a basic premise in life. If you aren't enjoying it in the moment when it is happening, then when are you enjoying it? :)

People often see technique as chops, i.e. how fast you can play. I know we've talked about this before; but in my view, technique encompasses everything you do as a musician. I was teaching one of my students the Soca. He asked, "How do you get that consistent sound out of the snare drum part." I said, "Watch what I am doing; What is it?" He looked and said, "It is Moeller," and a light went on. I know that it too formalistic for some people; but it works for me.
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  #498  
Old 09-18-2008, 06:15 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I like Neil Peart. He was the one who got me into drumming.
He lived not to far from me when I was in California. About an hour and a half or so.
He was friends with my PE teacher so I got to shake his hand and talk to him for a like a second. We didn't really talk though... He was leaving so I just said I liked his books a lot and he's my biggest inspiration... yup. It was awesome
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  #499  
Old 09-30-2008, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Anybody catch the Rush-hashana 24hr.marathon on VH1 last night?
Neil has been one of my favorites for eons. Still to this day, 30 years later, his drumming is great. I understand there are phenomenal drummers on the scene; Colaiuta, Weckl, Donati, Lang, Minnimen, Harrison, Mayer, Collins and more that are on a whole other level that people will say "(drummers name here) is better then Neil Peart." Only thing I could say is that I would imagine that, THAT drummer probably was influenced by Neil to some degree. Or at least respects him for his acomplishments. And I believe there are just as many guys that wanted/want to be Neil, that want to be Virgil, Marco or Thomas. And don't forget to give Neil credit for what he has accomplished in his 30+ year career, and not discredit him for what others can do that Neil cant or hasn't.
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  #500  
Old 10-02-2008, 07:02 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Anybody catch the Rush-hashana 24hr.marathon on VH1 last night?
Neil has been one of my favorites for eons. Still to this day, 30 years later, his drumming is great. I understand there are phenomenal drummers on the scene; Colaiuta, Weckl, Donati, Lang, Minnimen, Harrison, Mayer, Collins and more that are on a whole other level .

Wow how did I miss that....

Are you saying Phil Collins is on another level than Neil....don't get me wrong I think hes a good drummer but personally I don't think of his style as being very technical...except for the fact that he can sing and play at the same time which to me is crazy hard....
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  #501  
Old 10-02-2008, 10:52 PM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by LinearDrummer View Post
Wow how did I miss that....

Are you saying Phil Collins is on another level than Neil....don't get me wrong I think hes a good drummer but personally I don't think of his style as being very technical...except for the fact that he can sing and play at the same time which to me is crazy hard....
Should have been more specific............Grant Collins, the Monster from Australia.
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Old 10-03-2008, 01:17 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Should have been more specific............Grant Collins, the Monster from Australia.
Ahhhh....don't know much bout him...

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Originally Posted by mikeybbdrummin View Post

people will say "(drummers name here) is better then Neil Peart." Only thing I could say is that I would imagine that, THAT drummer probably was influenced by Neil to some degree.
Is it my imagination or does there seem to be a trend of Neil bashing in forums lately....
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Old 10-03-2008, 06:54 PM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by LinearDrummer View Post
Ahhhh....don't know much bout him...



Is it my imagination or does there seem to be a trend of Neil bashing in forums lately....
Not by me. It seems to be true though. I think guys that may not be in to or influenced by him discover guys that do the most extreme independence/speed/time changes and say, This drummer is better then Neil. He's over rated. But take a guy like Jeff Porcaro. He is known for having incredible feel and his shuffle. I don't think Jeff could have played what Virgil can or play like Vinnie can. BUT Jeff gets recognition for the drummer HE was, NOT the drummer that A, B or C is. Its just not that way w/Neil for some reason. People want to rip him up for what he has not done that others have. Just don't get it.
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Old 10-23-2008, 09:33 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Went to my first Rush show in '80 and have caught numerous shows
per each tour since. Love that band.

Neil is another player I've had the good fortune to get to meet and interview
on a few occasions in the 90's. Very bright and rather soft spoken. I found him to
be really funny and down to earth.

He was by far my biggest influence as a teen in the late 70's / early 80's.
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  #505  
Old 11-04-2008, 09:55 PM
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LinearDrummer LinearDrummer is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Thought I would share this link to a great blog by Neil about the BR concert....
http://www.neilpeart.net/news/

Some excerpts:
In 1992, I had my first opportunity to play with a big band, when Cathy Rich, Buddy’s daughter, invited me to play at a Buddy Rich Memorial Scholarship Concert in New York City. Though powerfully intimidated by the challenge, and naturally inclined to avoid it, I forced myself to accept. The results were . . . let’s say, “mixed.” .

This is why I cringe when people bash him for trying something different...He knows he struggled thats why he went to Freddie to loosen up....

I still had a nagging feeling that when I played in that style, I was just imitating it, not really feeling it properly. So, in early 2007, when Cathy Rich and I began discussing another Buddy tribute concert (agreeing, “It’s time”), I started thinking about trying to upgrade my “swing skills.”

Also why I cringe when Neil fanboys say that was a great performance....He is without a doubt probably my biggest drum hero but that concert is just painful to watch....

During a break in this summer’s Snakes and Arrows tour, I scheduled a lesson with Peter(Erskine). When I parked in front of his house in Santa Monica and walked up to the door, sticks in hand, I had to smile at myself. I was a thirteen-year-old beginner again, climbing the stairs to the Peninsula Conservatory of Music on St. Paul Street in St. Catharines, Ontario, for my Saturday morning lesson with my first teacher, Don George.

He is humble....its not his fault fans made him out to be "Da greatest drummah eva eva eva"...

Anywayz its a great read and theres plenty more insight into one of the most recognizable drummers of our time....
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Old 11-04-2008, 11:23 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by LinearDrummer View Post
Thought I would share this link to a great blog by Neil about the BR concert....
http://www.neilpeart.net/news/

Some excerpts:
In 1992, I had my first opportunity to play with a big band, when Cathy Rich, Buddy’s daughter, invited me to play at a Buddy Rich Memorial Scholarship Concert in New York City. Though powerfully intimidated by the challenge, and naturally inclined to avoid it, I forced myself to accept. The results were . . . let’s say, “mixed.” .

This is why I cringe when people bash him for trying something different...He knows he struggled thats why he went to Freddie to loosen up....

I still had a nagging feeling that when I played in that style, I was just imitating it, not really feeling it properly. So, in early 2007, when Cathy Rich and I began discussing another Buddy tribute concert (agreeing, “It’s time”), I started thinking about trying to upgrade my “swing skills.”

Also why I cringe when Neil fanboys say that was a great performance....He is without a doubt probably my biggest drum hero but that concert is just painful to watch....

During a break in this summer’s Snakes and Arrows tour, I scheduled a lesson with Peter(Erskine). When I parked in front of his house in Santa Monica and walked up to the door, sticks in hand, I had to smile at myself. I was a thirteen-year-old beginner again, climbing the stairs to the Peninsula Conservatory of Music on St. Paul Street in St. Catharines, Ontario, for my Saturday morning lesson with my first teacher, Don George.

He is humble....its not his fault fans made him out to be "Da greatest drummah eva eva eva"...

Anywayz its a great read and theres plenty more insight into one of the most recognizable drummers of our time....
Thanks, LD! Great analogy!



;-)
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  #507  
Old 11-05-2008, 01:57 AM
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I like Neil for playing Neil's style. He will not (IMO) in my lifetime ever be regarded as a great jazz/groove drummer. I really like his big-band bit at the end of his Rush in Rio solo O batterista.

I have *all* of my Rush albums and DVD's on my MP3 player while I am deployed.

I enjoy Neil's work within his boundaries. It's works for his music and I really appreciate what he has accomplished over the years.

He does what he does very well. Conversely, Peter Erskine will never be regarded as great prog or metal drummers in his lifetime. That doesn't matter a whit to me, because what he does is also great...but he's not Neil, and Neil isn't Peter Erskine.
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Old 11-05-2008, 07:17 AM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by trkdrmr View Post
I like Neil for playing Neil's style. He will not (IMO) in my lifetime ever be regarded as a great jazz/groove drummer. I really like his big-band bit at the end of his Rush in Rio solo O batterista.

I have *all* of my Rush albums and DVD's on my MP3 player while I am deployed.

I enjoy Neil's work within his boundaries. It's works for his music and I really appreciate what he has accomplished over the years.

He does what he does very well. Conversely, Peter Erskine will never be regarded as great prog or metal drummers in his lifetime. That doesn't matter a whit to me, because what he does is also great...but he's not Neil, and Neil isn't Peter Erskine.
You express my thoughts exactly as I did above. Judge Neil on what HE has accomplished and how HE plays. Not, Vinnie, Virgil, Marco and so on. I bought a DRUM mag from G.C.18 months ago that had Rod Morgenstein on it. I asked the guy that worked there (about 20) if he liked him. He said he wasnt familiar w/him. I said, He is a great all around drummer that I like a lot. He can play almost anything. At that point he said, "Thats why I dont like Neil Peart, he cant play jazz. I like Steve Gadd." I tried to explaine the obvious about such a moronic comment, but I could never open his eyes. He has his opinion, but needless to say, I never talked to him again when I went in. And I bought a new kit and spent about $1000 and gave the commission to a guy I knew there that wasnt a moron. Anyway, drums have different styles like football has different positions. Cause one football player cant play quarterback as well as a quarterback doesnt make him any less of a player.
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  #509  
Old 11-05-2008, 04:23 PM
Paul Quin Paul Quin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by LinearDrummer View Post
Thought I would share this link to a great blog by Neil about the BR concert....
http://www.neilpeart.net/news/

Some excerpts:
In 1992, I had my first opportunity to play with a big band, when Cathy Rich, Buddy’s daughter, invited me to play at a Buddy Rich Memorial Scholarship Concert in New York City. Though powerfully intimidated by the challenge, and naturally inclined to avoid it, I forced myself to accept. The results were . . . let’s say, “mixed.” .

This is why I cringe when people bash him for trying something different...He knows he struggled thats why he went to Freddie to loosen up....

I still had a nagging feeling that when I played in that style, I was just imitating it, not really feeling it properly. So, in early 2007, when Cathy Rich and I began discussing another Buddy tribute concert (agreeing, “It’s time”), I started thinking about trying to upgrade my “swing skills.”

Also why I cringe when Neil fanboys say that was a great performance....He is without a doubt probably my biggest drum hero but that concert is just painful to watch....

During a break in this summer’s Snakes and Arrows tour, I scheduled a lesson with Peter(Erskine). When I parked in front of his house in Santa Monica and walked up to the door, sticks in hand, I had to smile at myself. I was a thirteen-year-old beginner again, climbing the stairs to the Peninsula Conservatory of Music on St. Paul Street in St. Catharines, Ontario, for my Saturday morning lesson with my first teacher, Don George.

He is humble....its not his fault fans made him out to be "Da greatest drummah eva eva eva"...

Anywayz its a great read and theres plenty more insight into one of the most recognizable drummers of our time....
Thanks for posting. What a class act. A great article about a great event.

Paul
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  #510  
Old 11-08-2008, 11:44 PM
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LeeLovesSabian LeeLovesSabian is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Neil is awesome.
He makes me jealous though, when he plays fast; his face doesn't even change, he always looks calm and incredibly focused.
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  #511  
Old 11-25-2008, 08:16 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mikei  
He does look miserable or at least slightly constipated while playing. I always wished that he would "get into it" a bit more. 

One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.

I think Neil's stern look is a matter of him concentrating on his busy drum parts, not the fact he isn't enjoying himself.

I saw Rush in the early 80s and even then he had this "stern" look.

I play myself in a bar band and people have said to me I look fed-up when I'm playing, when in fact nothing could be further from the truth and I'm merely, concentrating on my part.
So true....so true. I actually play a lot of Rush. It makes you think, therefore the "stern" look. Its actually deep concentration and Zen at the same time. Being in the moment so deep that everything else dissolves. Yet your own innear joy, while not expressed via a smile, is as deep as your thoughts.
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  #512  
Old 11-26-2008, 07:52 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by trkdrmr View Post
I like Neil for playing Neil's style. He will not (IMO) in my lifetime ever be regarded as a great jazz/groove drummer...
I hear where you are coming from. Setting the term "jazz" aside, one thing that I'm not sure about is how the term "groove" is being used here. However, if the term can be applied to any Rush tune at all, songs like Red Sector A and Kid Gloves come to mind as ones where the groove/backbeat was totally essential to the song.

There are so many good Rush tunes with totally unique drum parts.

Steve
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  #513  
Old 11-26-2008, 09:20 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by sshu View Post
I hear where you are coming from. Setting the term "jazz" aside, one thing that I'm not sure about is how the term "groove" is being used here. However, if the term can be applied to any Rush tune at all, songs like Red Sector A and Kid Gloves come to mind as ones where the groove/backbeat was totally essential to the song.

There are so many good Rush tunes with totally unique drum parts.

Steve
I was basically commenting on those that try to make Neil something he isn't. He is legendary in his genre.

Body electric and mystic rhythms are very unique. Bassline to BE is very cool too.
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  #514  
Old 12-30-2008, 03:20 PM
Ragnarok96 Ragnarok96 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Saw him last year at the snakes and arrows tour. Drum solo was fantastic.
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  #515  
Old 12-30-2008, 04:37 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Ragnarok96 View Post
Saw him last year at the snakes and arrows tour. Drum solo was fantastic.
Ah I'm jelous! I was invited by my friends (they are twins) and they ended up bringing their mom instead. I understood completely, but I was kinda dissapointed that I couldn't see Neil Geddy and Alex. I think they will tour again though, so I will definatly catch them next time around.
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  #516  
Old 12-30-2008, 05:14 PM
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Pachikara-Tharakan Pachikara-Tharakan is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Love Neil Peart and his technics. Recently I am trying to learn that Max Roach Shuffle that he talks about in his drum video. Watching him play is really worth. He is serious buisiness
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  #517  
Old 01-05-2009, 09:53 PM
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drummer girl09 drummer girl09 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

This might be a stupid question but how exactly would you pronounce his last name? I heard that he doesn't really care on how it's pronounced. But is it Peart like the sound pearl? Or do you sound out the 'e' too in Peart?

He's one of my favorite drummers, and inspirations by the way, I just don't want to say his name wrong!
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  #518  
Old 01-05-2009, 09:56 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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This might be a stupid question but how exactly would you pronounce his last name? I heard that he doesn't really care on how it's pronounced. But is it Peart like the sound pearl? Or do you sound out the 'e' too in Peart?

He's one of my favorite drummers, and inspirations by the way, I just don't want to say his name wrong!
Pronounced as "Peert."
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  #519  
Old 01-08-2009, 06:07 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Muckster View Post
Pronounced as "Peert."
Yeah it may be "P-art" but He will always be known as "Pert" since that pronounciation kinda took on a life of its own :)
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  #520  
Old 01-08-2009, 06:43 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I would not be playing drums if I had not bought my first 2112 CD back when I was 14.. I love PEart. I dont care how you say his name. He is a god amongst insects.
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