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  #441  
Old 06-06-2008, 12:50 AM
mikei mikei is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by zambizzi View Post
...and he was incredible, of course. How he can play so fast and hard after all these years is mind boggling. He snapped one of those oak sticks on the bell of his ride during his solo and without missing a beat, tossed it and pulled out another.

He looks miserable while he plays...but he tore it up, for sure. The whole band was incredible.

I just wish I had brought my earplugs, I forgot on the way out the door...
He does look miserable or at least slightly constipated while playing. I always wished that he would "get into it" a bit more.

One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.
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  #442  
Old 06-06-2008, 04:59 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

saw him for the first time Saturday night. the band was awesome. And being a Southpark fan; Way to go.

Great show.

John

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Originally Posted by zambizzi View Post
In 3 hrs. I'll be watching Neil live! Whoo hoo!
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  #443  
Old 06-06-2008, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mikei View Post
One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.
I don't think he's ever been that type of player.....pretty much all business....

Plus I don't get the whole Portnoy hitting himself on the side of his head with his stick....
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  #444  
Old 07-16-2008, 07:02 AM
drum_widow drum_widow is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Hi,
Let me first apologize if I posted this wrong or in the wrong place but I am not familiar with these sites. I leave that to my husband (which is why I am here). Just like most of you my husband is a HUGE Neil fan. I am looking for something very special to get him for his birthday in October. We just went to see Rush in May, and he has all the videos I believe. He doesn't have many of the books but those will be gifts from the kids. What I was hoping to find out is if there are any drum clinics going on with Neil anywhere (I'm willing to fly him anywhere in North America) or if anyone has any other great suggestions. What would be your ultimate Neil gift (besides his drums)? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. And once again I apologize if I posted this wrong. Thanks for your help!
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  #445  
Old 07-16-2008, 07:35 AM
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crdirtRider856 crdirtRider856 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

[quote=drum_widow;459461]Hi,
Let me first apologize if I posted this wrong or in the wrong place but I am not familiar with these sites. I am looking for something very special to get him for his birthday in October. QUOTE]

No worries, sounds like you your pretty supportive! You could possibly find a signed drumhead from Neil but you have to be careful with getting the "true" thing.(E bay, Craigslist). If not, tickets to their next show would be enough to make any Rush fan happy! Good luck!
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  #446  
Old 07-16-2008, 11:02 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Jammin' Jamin 2112 View Post
Did anyone know that Neil Peart was rated the 2nd WORST lyricist by Blender Magazine? I think this is ridiculous. I'd like to see the writers of Blender create a 20 minute long sci-fi song.
Its quite possible they just dont know how to read, someone send those idiots the lyrics to "Nobody s Hero" please.
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  #447  
Old 08-24-2008, 07:36 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Colin View Post
That's part of Peart's playing. You can't just go to a concert and expect the band to improvise and change every song on their set. Sometimes it's good just to hear what you're hearing on the CD. You get a sense of familiarity with it. For example, a certain fill or something small like a triplet in a ride pattern. Neil Peart is a perfectionist in his playing. You can't dislike him just because he chooses and remembers to play every exact note on a CD. It's irrational. Not every drummer has to change what they're playing, for a concert.

+1. Also, those drummers who are so big on improv are probably improving because they can't play what they laid down in studio.

With Peart you know it's all real, no studio gimmicks with him, no double takes and do-overs...he produces brilliant drumming, puts in on record and then goes out and gets it done on stage.

I would NOT want to hear "Tom Sawyer" improvised, because it does not need to be...the fact he plays the song 'as is' time and time again is what astounds me about the guy. He's brilliant. And if you want to see Neil Peart improvise, he does and will, it's usually on his drum solos in concert. I've seen Rush over the years 7 or 8 times and not once have they (Peart, Alex, and Geddy) been anything less than brilliant and breathtaking.
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  #448  
Old 08-29-2008, 02:05 PM
BjornMoren BjornMoren is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
IMO his concert solos ARE improvisations, and are anything BUT boring.
I have two live albums and Ive seen Rush live once. I got the feeling he didnt improvise at all in his solos. I havnt studied this in any detail, so you could be right.

Peart does some inventive drumming both on songs and in his solos, and some songs I really like a lot. But for me it feels like he cant think outside the box. I cant even imagine him emulating Zigaboo, Garibaldi, Gadd or Stubblefield. Even the simplest groove. Either he's not into that music or he doesnt get it.

Dont get me wrong; hes probably the best drummer of prog rock, but I cant stop feeling like there is something missing. Maybe simply because Im not into prog rock anymore.

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
Just because Neil Peart shows that he is serious about his playing, and has a look of concentration that looks like he isn't having fun, I can assure you, that couldn't be further from the truth.
Sorry I shouldnt have been so harsh. I realise that some drummers are more about performance. Again, its not my style, but I have to respect it.

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
And why is it a bad thing to play every fill exactly like the albums? I'll NEVER understand why some have a problem with that. :-| Doesn't that show precision in his playing? His dedication to his craft? What makes him who he is?.
It surely shows who he is. He is all about that. And thats an admirable skill. But come on, he's got to be able to improve and improvise on songs that he wrote 20 years ago. Where is his progress as a musician? He could probably play Tom Sawyer in his sleep. I would love to hear that song with brand new fills, not that the original fills are bad.

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
I personally think he did a very respectable performance of Cottontail, with a sweet solo along with it.?.
I wouldnt say he sucks, but pretty close to it. Have you watched the clip? The phrasing, the timing, the dynamics. Where is it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
And as far as his lyrical inspiration from Ayn Rand, it's been years since he's written any AR inspired lyrics. It's not like he's obsessed with Rand. A lot of lyricists are inspired by writers and authors, aren't they?
Yea youre right. Sorry for mentioning it.

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Anyway...Welcome to DW. ;-)
Thanks man! :-)
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  #449  
Old 08-29-2008, 06:57 PM
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Vipercussionist Vipercussionist is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by mikei View Post
He does look miserable or at least slightly constipated while playing. I always wished that he would "get into it" a bit more.

One of the things I love about Portnoy and Bonham. You can just tell how much fun they are having.
I suspect that's just an involuntary face he makes when he's entirely focused on what he's doing. I'd say he couldn't BE more into it!

I doubt (though I don't KNOW) it's any real bad or distasteful vibes for him.
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  #450  
Old 08-31-2008, 02:38 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Who did the cowbells routine first?


Mike Portnoy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBnK7fC4yj0

Neil Pert
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47yxLg2RyXM
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  #451  
Old 09-01-2008, 01:01 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I've seen Rush 5 times, the last time being around the Permanent Waves tour. I have a few albums after that but they lost me after a while. I think Neil is one of the premier prog rock drummers of all time, period. He has his style and he's damn good at it, just like other drummers have their style. So what if Neil can't groove like Steve Gadd or Jeff Porcaro, does it really matter?
I think Neil looks a bit wooden when he plays and doesn't appear to be the most graceful looking of drummers I've seen but you know what...he gets the job done and he does it extremely well. He's continued to push himself and improve when he could easily rested on his considerable laurels. I say enjoy the man for what he is and what he has accomplished. You don't get to his level of playing by accident or by sheer luck. He's the consummate pro, period.
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  #452  
Old 09-01-2008, 01:07 AM
wy yung wy yung is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I think he's great at what he does. I respect anyone who is successful at what they do. I do feel though that his influence is not always positive in that it can make many younger guys over play. Fills every 4 bars or so etc. This works great in Rush but wont be as profitable in a Steppenwolf cover band.
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  #453  
Old 09-01-2008, 01:18 AM
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enforcerdrummer enforcerdrummer is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by jamsjr44 View Post
Stu-Strib, so your saying from Power Windows which was released in 1985 and beyond has been horrifying? Just a suggestion I would really listen again. I wasn't totally thrilled with Roll the Bones CD, but it grew on me. As far as every other album within that time frame I think has been great Presto is an awesome album because it was the first time they went back to playing stripped down and not alot of sythesizers. I haven't got a chance to pick up their new album Feedback yet but I will.

As far as lyrics you should really read alot of them because Neil Peart writes incredible lyrics. All of their songs are truly about something. Most bands today lyrics are very weak in comparision.

And every band changes with the time, that's just the way it is. Motley Crue, Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, Living Colour ( whose last album was just awful!) all of them sound nothing like they did when they first came out if Led Zeppelin was still around their sound would have changed as well. And all of those bands I mentioned above have produced crap music since the late 90's or 00's. Even my latest favorite bands like Tool since 1993 and Sevendust since 1997 have changed the way they sound. Rush has produced 18 albums not including lives ones ( 29 in all) and still have a tremendous following. They didn't suffer the death that most hair bands did who are now only playing 500 seat venues because no one really wants to see them anymore. The TRUE Rush faithful has and will always remain. Come back to the dark side STU!!!...LOL

PS
What still amazes me the most is they did not replace members since Neil took over for John Rustey after their very first album, and that is dedication to each other and shows the true strength of a band survivng and changing with the times.

Woooo man, wooooo! Living Colour's last album was terrible! After reading that my eyes hurt. Living Colour rules and their last album was great in my opinion. Let's here 3 doors down version of "Back in Black." And Rush Rules too and I wish they were more like Living Colour. Instead of playing to computer graphics and videos, it would be nice if Rush changed their songs a little. Not every song, I mean Tom Sawyer is a classic but change it up some. Just some. The acoustic songs they did during their 2004 tour was nice and they need to expand on those ideas.
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  #454  
Old 09-01-2008, 02:44 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Bonham to the moon View Post
thats why i dislike him, its like why would you want to go to a concert and listen to the SAME thing you would hear on the CD, i dunno, its kinda boring.
I've been to shows where the band plays it just like the CD and others where the band changes it up. I prefer a band that plays the song like I know it. Changing it just for the sake of changing it doesn't make much sense to me. The live performance is where it's at. Nothing beats that and if the band plays it like the CD I don't care because the energy of the live show blows away any CD. That's not boring to me but hey, that's just me.
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  #455  
Old 09-01-2008, 02:55 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by wy yung View Post
I think he's great at what he does. I respect anyone who is successful at what they do. I do feel though that his influence is not always positive in that it can make many younger guys over play. Fills every 4 bars or so etc. This works great in Rush but wont be as profitable in a Steppenwolf cover band.
well, that's where the drummer needs to show some discipline. You wouldn't play like Charlie Watts in Rush or like Neil in the Rolling Stones. If a drummer favors a busy style then maybe he should join a band that needs that style. One should play for the song, not to massage one's ego. It takes discipline.
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  #456  
Old 09-01-2008, 03:48 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Baddstuff View Post
I've been to shows where the band plays it just like the CD and others where the band changes it up. I prefer a band that plays the song like I know it. Changing it just for the sake of changing it doesn't make much sense to me. The live performance is where it's at. Nothing beats that and if the band plays it like the CD I don't care because the energy of the live show blows away any CD. That's not boring to me but hey, that's just me.
Some bands write in the studio, others write on tour. Radiohead do both. When they did the tours for 'Kid A' and 'Amnesiac' they actually had to re-arrange all their songs to work in a live situation, with some really great results. I always like hearing new arrangements of old classics and sometimes I just wish bands would stop resting on their laurels and experiment. If it goes wrong, it goes wrong, but if you're a band like Rush who've been going for thirty years plus, there is no financial risk from changing your style. Whilst it might alienate some fans; other than a lack of imagination, there is no reason why you shouldn't try something new. Lots of great bands do it - Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin being but two - underwent enormous stylistic changes and their durations (or at least their 'classic' periods) were less than half that of Rushes!

At least spice up the live arrangements to do something new. If I wanted to see exact covers I'd go and see a tribute band. Otherwise I'd just buy the CD.
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  #457  
Old 09-01-2008, 04:28 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I understand what you're saying. Some people like bands to mix it up a bit and others are content to hear the songs as they were recorded. No matter what Rush does they will not please everybody. Tribute bands are OK but for the most part they're not my cup of tea. If I want to hear Rush songs I want to hear Neil playing them since he created the drums parts. A tribute band drummer, regardless of how good he is, is merely copying someone else's licks. And when I watch the Rush in Rio DVD it looks to me like those folks out there didn't mind one bit the songs were played like the CD. I hear what you're saying but by now I think most people know what they're gonna get when they go see Rush. I'm assuming that those that go to the shows will take Rush as they are. To each his own! :)
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  #458  
Old 09-02-2008, 01:58 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I see some people here calling Peart the best drummer ever. I've seen Neil 5 times and I think he's one of the great prog drummers of all time but as someone who has seen Billy Cobham, Dennis Chambers, Terry Bozzio, Dave Weckl, Louis Bellson, Steve Smith, Rod Morgenstein, Alphonse Mouzon, Lenny White, Carl Palmer, Virgil Donati, Gary Novak, Dave Garibaldi, Chad Wackerman, etc, and the master himself...Buddy Rich, I cannot call Neil 'THE BEST'.
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  #459  
Old 09-03-2008, 03:01 PM
michael drums
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Baddstuff View Post
I see some people here calling Peart the best drummer ever. I've seen Neil 5 times and I think he's one of the great prog drummers of all time but as someone who has seen Billy Cobham, Dennis Chambers, Terry Bozzio, Dave Weckl, Louis Bellson, Steve Smith, Rod Morgenstein, Alphonse Mouzon, Lenny White, Carl Palmer, Virgil Donati, Gary Novak, Dave Garibaldi, Chad Wackerman, etc, and the master himself...Buddy Rich, I cannot call Neil 'THE BEST'.
Well...


I've seen Neil Peart 22 times, and I can assure you, he's "one" of THE best "rock" drummers of all time. If you categorize each drummer to his "own" genre of drum style(music), you can certainly make the case for NP as the best "rock drummer" ever. Though you'd have some disagreements.

But to bunch up all the above drummers into one category, is NOT how you determine who's "the best ever".

And I have seen Weckl, Palmer and Smith in concert. And have seen countless videos and heard even more recordings of Buddy.
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  #460  
Old 09-04-2008, 01:13 AM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I prefer the term 'one of the best' as opposed to calling someone 'the best'. Even Buddy Rich, who I have seen, I hesitate to call him The Best. I've seen too many incredible drummers to single one out and put The Best label on him. Some people can do that, I can't. I guess calling someone the best makes for good discussion but that's about it.
And tomorrow night I will be seeing 'one of the best', Mr. Billy Cobham.
I haven't seen Billy since his days after Mahavishnu so I am primed and ready.
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  #461  
Old 09-04-2008, 02:52 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

IMO I see that Neil has IMPROVED as he's gotten older and probably wiser. His "groove quotient" has improved and his chops have gotten more precise and clean.

It used to bug me when they would go from one section of a tune to the next it would change tempo, speed AND feel.

I like the smoother way they've matured at the segues and changes by grabbing both ends and pulling them to straighten them out a bit. (if you know what I mean)
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  #462  
Old 09-07-2008, 10:50 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

i really can't the fuss going on about neil peart being the greatest or one of the greatest drummers ever all around the net. this is just my opinion so please people don't start getting angry.

i've watched him a lot but he never ever got me interested with his playing. I thought it was empty and shallow playing. I can't feel anything with his playing. Maybe he has good technique but he never coordinates his solos. He just does one thing, stops and does another thing. It's like a series of moves you study at home. No improvisation at all.

I just can't really understand people can even compare him with the legends like Buddy Rich, Dave Weckl, John Bonham, Dennis Chambers, Elvin Jones and so on. I think it's an insult to these legends to call Neil Peart the greatest drummer.
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  #463  
Old 09-07-2008, 02:09 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by dimensiontr View Post
i really can't the fuss going on about neil peart being the greatest or one of the greatest drummers ever all around the net. this is just my opinion so please people don't start getting angry.

i've watched him a lot but he never ever got me interested with his playing. I thought it was empty and shallow playing. I can't feel anything with his playing. Maybe he has good technique but he never coordinates his solos. He just does one thing, stops and does another thing. It's like a series of moves you study at home. No improvisation at all.

I just can't really understand people can even compare him with the legends like Buddy Rich, Dave Weckl, John Bonham, Dennis Chambers, Elvin Jones and so on. I think it's an insult to these legends to call Neil Peart the greatest drummer.
He's "one" of the greatest drummers of all time.

In fact...Modern Drummer considers him a Drum God.

That's NOT "hero worship", as some like to call it.

It's just fact.

And please stop comparing NP with others. It's really not how to appreciate him.

He's his "own" drummer, just like the others are.

You know what the word "unique" means?
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  #464  
Old 09-07-2008, 02:26 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by DjKaos View Post
Who did the cowbells routine first?


Mike Portnoy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBnK7fC4yj0

Neil Pert
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47yxLg2RyXM
Actually...


Portnoy is doing a Peart solo from Exit Stage Left(1982), in this video.

Where was Dream Theater in 1982?

Seriously...MP is a huge NP fan. Hence, who's doing whos' solo?

;-)
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  #465  
Old 09-07-2008, 06:56 PM
Baddstuff Baddstuff is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by dimensiontr View Post
i really can't the fuss going on about neil peart being the greatest or one of the greatest drummers ever all around the net. this is just my opinion so please people don't start getting angry.

i've watched him a lot but he never ever got me interested with his playing. I thought it was empty and shallow playing. I can't feel anything with his playing. Maybe he has good technique but he never coordinates his solos. He just does one thing, stops and does another thing. It's like a series of moves you study at home. No improvisation at all.

I just can't really understand people can even compare him with the legends like Buddy Rich, Dave Weckl, John Bonham, Dennis Chambers, Elvin Jones and so on. I think it's an insult to these legends to call Neil Peart the greatest drummer.
if that's how you feel that's quite alright. We all have our own opinions. I don't judge Neil on his solos any more than I judge Dennis Chambers on his. I'm more interested in how a drummer plays with a band than how he plays on his own. A drummer can be a great soloist but if he can't groove with a band then so what, right? Neil does a splendid job in the context of the band. I wouldn't call Neil a groove drummer in the way I would DC, Gadd, Garibaldi, Jeff Porcaro, etc but it doesn't matter. Neil's style fits Rush and that's all that matters.

Speaking for myself I would never compare Neil with Buddy, Weckl, Jones or DC. Comparing him with Mike Portnoy would make more sense. I wouldn't compare Bonham to Buddy either. There is no such thing as THE GREATEST, be it bass, drums, guitar, whatever. It's a mythical title. To call someone ONE OF THE GREATEST makes more sense. But hey, that's just me!
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  #466  
Old 09-13-2008, 04:01 AM
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Zumba_Zumba Zumba_Zumba is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Comparisons. Seriously people. Neil is my biggest drum hero. I know he can't do what Dennis Chambers or Vinnie or Virgil can do, but remember new drummers in the 80's and even early 90's were being measured against Neil. In the 80's (some of you were a mere twinkle in your dad's eye) Neil was pretty much the only drummer using multiple effects in his music (and yes, he did use all of his kit; I hate reading that he didn't here). Check out the video, "A Show of Hands" and the song Territories specifically. He did some cutting edge stuff for the time. Most of you can copy his stuff, and then say, "oh, no big deal, I'm just as good!" Keep in mind, HE INVENTED THESE PATTERNS to nicely fit the music. And prog rock music for most of his career was very electronic and stiff feeling. He's just stuck in his ways. People say the same thing about Lang, but give me a break, he is ground breaking. Funny thing is (and I hope this happens so drumming continues to evolve) in the future, people are going to say all this same negative stuff about Virgil Donati (sorry fanboys). So drumming evolves, tastes change, and influences die. Welcome to the art of drumming.

Oh yeah, Mediocrefunkybeat, I have no idea where you arrived at the conclusion that Rush has not majorly changed their style. Compare Fly by Night, Signals, Hold Your Fire, Presto, and Counterparts. 70s....80s.....90s....2000s. They changed.
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  #467  
Old 09-13-2008, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Zumba_Zumba View Post
Funny thing is (and I hope this happens so drumming continues to evolve) in the future, people are going to say all this same negative stuff about Virgil Donati (sorry fanboys). So drumming evolves, tastes change, and influences die. Welcome to the art of drumming.
I don't want to get into the value discussion regarding Neil Peart as much as I want to continue to express my concern for this thought out there that drumming evolves every time it changes.

I just don't see that.

Some of the greatest drumming in the history of the world occured in the 1930s and 40s. It didn't need 70 years to evolve. It was already there, and still is. How about that Dave Tough guy who pushed the stylistic envelope in the 1920s? That stuff is still as good as anything right now/ this minute. Buddy Rich with Artie Shaw and Sid Catlett with everybody in the 30s, Kenny Clarke with Bird in the 40s, Elvin Jones in the 60s, Bonham with Zep in their era. Are people really serious when they say drumming has evolved from that?

Innocently yes, I think I know where guys like Zumba are coming from. Much of the discussion appears to be of a technical nature, with much of that coming from improvements in equipment as much as actual changes in the way we drummers make music evolve. With all seriousness, has there really been that much evolution in American music over the last 30 years, as much as there have been ocassional changes in styles?

What many of these people do is present a perception of individual style. And that's a really good thing. But it's usually not evolution.

When I listen to the so called evolution curve of drums these days, I personally really don't hear so much beyond some tricks that guys perform at clinics, that are outside practical music concepts. Even these so called revolutionary grooves that everyone raves about have been performed in some variation or the other as non western music for hundreds if not thousands of years. In jazz, yeah I do hear some new ideas being exercised from time to time by some very great players. But much of what they are doing are new creative slants on what are really the same old styles of the past. Even when a true eternal groundbreaker like say a Jack DeJohnette looks like he's gonna break out the true rise up the evolutionary ladder, necessary commercial considerations to play with all star tours etc get in the way. The same can also be said for Stewart, Blade etc.

Maybe a certifiable blue chipper like Hoenig can do it. But he will still have to be surrounded by like minded musicians willing to do more than push the envelope of stuff done before. As much as I love that stuff, you still can't help but hear Paul Motian with Bill Evans. And until I quit hearing that, the evolution hasn't ocurred there either.

When Kenny Clarke and Max Roach elevated the importance of left hand and bass drum independence in such a way that it has been incorporated into all necessary playing of today, that was a certifiable evolved revolution, and has stood the test of time. Really much of what we worship now are new concepts based on old ideas already used by fusion guys 40 years ago, and in the case of guys like Lenny White you didn't even need 2 bass drum pedals to do it. On that note, it's also interesting to me to see so many people now going back to one pedal, which is why people usually don't always claim evolution until time has passed to see if the so called evolution was really a just a fad. Now I'm not saying that's the case with that. But it's all still very new.

Like him or not, Neil Peart's got the magic, even if some of us think the whole he's a god thing is kinda silly. I only wish we would think twice when we throw out the word evolution for every little thing. To me, that's a word you keep in your wallet to use when it really is that.
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  #468  
Old 09-14-2008, 03:27 AM
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Ian Williams Ian Williams is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Hello, All.

Even drummers such as Neil Peart plus others have to learn and practise something new everyday, I do.
Every head is a different world, has a different opinion and different approach, that is part of life, that We must respect.

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Last edited by Ian Williams; 09-14-2008 at 09:31 PM. Reason: check spell
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  #469  
Old 09-14-2008, 07:28 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

That is the problem, the idolatry that goes into modern music making. And in Rock Band you can be Slash, Joe Perry or Jimmy Page or whomever for five minutes.

You can go see any number of great drummers, Brian Blade, Jeff Watts or Paul Motian in a club, have a good talk and shake their hand. It was when that aspect of music was lost in rock that the notion of a musical experience went down the drain.
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Old 09-14-2008, 04:20 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

The fact that the man can play his licks today the same as he did when he was in his 20's really shows the need for us drummers to respect the man. Not to mention he COMPOSES the songs, he is INVENTIVE and writes great LYRICS.

Listen to "Faithless" from Snakes and Arrows and you will see what I mean. And for those who think they have not evolved, compare this song with Tom Sawyer.
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Old 09-14-2008, 05:01 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
That is the problem, the idolatry that goes into modern music making. And in Rock Band you can be Slash, Joe Perry or Jimmy Page or whomever for five minutes.

You can go see any number of great drummers, Brian Blade, Jeff Watts or Paul Motian in a club, have a good talk and shake their hand. It was when that aspect of music was lost in rock that the notion of a musical experience went down the drain.
With Rock Band, now we will have many young drum stars. Listen to the young drummers today, its all about speed, beats per minute, making double bass sound like gas being emitted from their arse holes. No musicality. And these new "JAZZ" drummers. The same crap over the decades. It all sounds the same, fast notes slapped around a 4 piece. My 7 year old son and 9 year old daughter can do that.
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  #472  
Old 09-14-2008, 06:24 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by fixmejesus View Post
With Rock Band, now we will have many young drum stars. Listen to the young drummers today, its all about speed, beats per minute, making double bass sound like gas being emitted from their arse holes. No musicality. And these new "JAZZ" drummers. The same crap over the decades. It all sounds the same, fast notes slapped around a 4 piece. My 7 year old son and 9 year old daughter can do that.
I don't know who you're listening to but I think you need to rethink your future before you become just another old man shaking his head saying, "kids these days."

If you like Snakes and Arrows great. There is nothing wrong with that. Rush is a respectable band. The point is that too many people over 35 listen to nothing but the same stuff they listened to when they were 16. I loved Bonham when I was 13, then I outgrew it. I saw Rush four times 1976 through 1981. Then I out grew it. I still love both those bands and can listen to Hemispheres and enjoy it. But I don't spend my days with that music as a big part of my life anymore.

Where I live, that is all people listen to. Festivals and clubs have these tributes bands of everyone from Chicago, Zep, Floyd, Tull, Billy Joel, the Eagles. People need to get over the music. It's not music anymore. It's all a big marketing scheme. And they are even starting jazz tribute bands where the guys cop some of the lick on the recordings. It's not pretty.
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Old 09-14-2008, 07:26 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
I don't know who you're listening to but I think you need to rethink your future before you become just another old man shaking his head saying, "kids these days."
Ken, I don't really think it's that. Drum forums and youtube have an entire community of middle aged guys who are mad about a lot of stuff. And I'm not talking about very serious players like Steamer, the polite and ageless soak it all in guys like Gruntersdad and mikeii, or interesting guys with a sense of humor like Jon Cable. There really are a lot of older guys who show up to these things angry, when to me that doesn't make a whole lotta sense.

Until recently I personally got all riled up about this personal attack junk, but then it was explained to me by a truly great older musician that older guys who are never present as players but position themselves as top end critics are usually not part of the life anyway. So this is their way of being around. They also are big with using musicality as a comfortable catchphrase, throw their kids and their ages into the mix and lecture in the exact same place about how the younger guy has growing up to do when it's them who are frustrated. I've seen it all and I'm over it.

Not that long ago, I was on another forum where I was in a really nice debate with an older 30 year pro that I thought a lot of as a person and a musician. We disagreed about something, so I thought it would be cool to see the whole both sides thing, and while doing so, learn stuff from this guy. I should also say that HE was totally cool with the idea.

Well, 2 or 3 posts into it some middle aged self proclaimed wing man joined in, telling me what a young punk I was for having the nerve to debate this 30 year vet, the youth of today, their arrogance, growing up to do, etc, etc. Then it just turned into a discussion about me and him, when the original discussion was going great. I even told him that I wasn't going to roll in the mud with him, and he kept trying to bait, sort of like this guy here. Then I just left the board, and when I came back a few days later and he was still at it. Oh well.

Well, upon investigation, I found out this guy was barely out of his 20s himself, had played maybe 12 gigs in his life, worked in random sales jobs, and his myspace was unlistenable. It was obvious that he had only joined in to bring attention to this fantasy he had created. It was no different than those guys who go on computers thinking they're Star Trek characters.

So again, I wish this guy well. I guess we all have our roles. He thinks just respecting Peart's career isn't enough. You have to consider him a god, and if you don't see it that way you're a heretic. Well I just don't see it that way, and if anything, my growing up has helped that perspective not hurt it.

I'm off this discussion for the time being. Thanks.
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  #474  
Old 09-15-2008, 04:35 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
I don't know who you're listening to but I think you need to rethink your future before you become just another old man shaking his head saying, "kids these days."

If you like Snakes and Arrows great. There is nothing wrong with that. Rush is a respectable band. The point is that too many people over 35 listen to nothing but the same stuff they listened to when they were 16. I loved Bonham when I was 13, then I outgrew it. I saw Rush four times 1976 through 1981. Then I out grew it. I still love both those bands and can listen to Hemispheres and enjoy it. But I don't spend my days with that music as a big part of my life anymore.

Where I live, that is all people listen to. Festivals and clubs have these tributes bands of everyone from Chicago, Zep, Floyd, Tull, Billy Joel, the Eagles. People need to get over the music. It's not music anymore. It's all a big marketing scheme. And they are even starting jazz tribute bands where the guys cop some of the lick on the recordings. It's not pretty.
Nah, the smart kids today listen to Chicago, Zep, Floyd, Rush, police ET. AL.
Why? Because it was original and good. It was about musicianship and quality. It is still music, music so good it still sells over and over again.

I for one don't see my kids ever buying or downloading a Slipnot album ever! And thats a good thing.
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  #475  
Old 09-15-2008, 05:58 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by fixmejesus View Post
Nah, the smart kids today listen to Chicago, Zep, Floyd, Rush, police ET. AL.
Why? Because it was original and good. It was about musicianship and quality. It is still music, music so good it still sells over and over again.

I for one don't see my kids ever buying or downloading a Slipnot album ever! And thats a good thing.
Yes, it was good music. My library is full of all of it.

The young people where I live have a hard time finding places to perform because the culture is so steeped in the classic rock tradition, as though music stopped happening after 1984. So they started to have concerts at some of the monthly studio rental warehouses to be heard and make some money for rent.The Fire Marshall ended up closing some of them down because they were not zoned for that.

Today there is so much music that never gets heard because people have their heads and arse stuck in 1978. (The year Rush did their first headlining tour of the states, if I recall correctly)

I was getting e mails from Neil Peart recommending Porcupine Tree as I remember correctly, when their new album was coming out. Soundgarden, Radiohead, Tool, The Mars Volta, Muse, Stone Temple Pilots, Galactic, Green Day, Chili Peppers, Incubus, Primus, Coheed and Cambria, Soullive, Dream Theater. Have any of the bands done anything remotely interesting over the last ten years or so, or are we living in a musical vacuum?
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Last edited by Deltadrummer; 09-15-2008 at 06:11 AM.
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  #476  
Old 09-15-2008, 06:18 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deltadrummer View Post
Yes, it was good music. My library is full of all of it.

The young people where I live have a hard time finding places to perform because the culture is so steeped in the classic rock tradition, as though music stopped happening after 1984. So they started to have concerts at some of the monthly studio rental warehouses to be heard and make some money for rent.The Fire Marshall ended up closing some of them down because they were not zoned for that.

Today there is so much music that never gets heard because people have their heads and arse stuck in 1978. (The year Rush did their first headlining tour of the states, if I recall correctly)

I was getting e mails from Neil Peart recommending Porcupine Tree as I remember correctly, when their new album was coming out. Soundgarden, Radiohead, Tool, The Mars Volta, Muse, Stone Temple Pilots, Galactic, Green Day, Chili Peppers, Incubus, Primus, Coheed and Cambria, Soullive, Dream Theater. Have any of the bands done anything remotely interesting over the last ten years or so, or are we living in a musical vacuum?
Well...

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

NP and Rush ain't broken.
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  #477  
Old 09-15-2008, 05:56 PM
fixmejesus
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Default Re: Neil Peart

It would we interseting to hear an Rush song stating the condition of the internet today, it would be a sharp contrast to "Virtuality" from 12 years ago.
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  #478  
Old 09-15-2008, 07:19 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Posts deleted for the usual reasons. Telling someone that they shouldn't question a drummer who is better or more experienced than us would lead to some very short conversations, and personally insulting another forum member will earn you a quick escort to the exit. Play nice or take it elsewhere.
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  #479  
Old 09-16-2008, 12:58 AM
michael drums
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Posts deleted for the usual reasons. Telling someone that they shouldn't question a drummer who is better or more experienced than us would lead to some very short conversations, and personally insulting another forum member will earn you a quick escort to the exit. Play nice or take it elsewhere.
Telling someone that a certain drummer doesn't appeal to them, on a thread that's dedicated to said drummer, over and over and over...is insulting.

Demanding to "play nice" should be directed to ALL. Not just to ONE individual.

I'm more than happy to comply, DB.

I hope I have some company. And, that we can get back on topic. NP deserves nothing less! ;-)

Thanks!
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Old 09-16-2008, 01:07 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

On the other hand, it's a 'Discussion' forum. That's what it's for. Discussion. That means at least two sides.
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