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  #1  
Old 12-23-2007, 11:36 PM
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Default Recording Drums....?

When recording on a set, which would use at least 5-10 mics, do you simply plug every mic into the recorder, and each mic lays down a seperate track? Or what? How does this work?
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Old 12-24-2007, 03:59 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Just a thought...
I assume that by your questioning you need general help with recording techniques all together...
If your using a home studio recorder, google is our friend.
Try looking up your recorder on the web first.
To your actual question,
If your in the studio, your producer will take care of all of it. :)
if your recording from a home setup,
Normally yes, you will use a track for each mic.
If you have 5 drums and 10 mics, I would not try to use all the mics for sake of argument.
Experimentation is best.
But normally If i were to set you up, Id put a bass drum mic on the kick, snare,
mics on each tom, and maybe one or two overhead mics to pick up ALL the cymbals. That should be all you need.
The cymbals in general tend to bleed over, so I would not worry about placing mics directly on each cymbal if you know what I mean.
If your limited to how many tracks you can take up,
or if you are limited to the amount of tracs on your recorder,
you could always record your drum tracks first using up to 8 tracks,
then "dump" or "bounce" all the recorded drums over to a singe track, then delete the other single drum tracks (kick, snare, ect) to free up more empty recording tracks.
Drums are generally what take up the most time during recording. Once you got your drums recorded properly, you can go to town on the rest of the recording.
Hope this helps.
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  #3  
Old 12-24-2007, 07:41 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

I wouldn't use ten, I'd most likely only use a maximum of five (two overheads, bass, double snare) but that's just me.

If you were using that many microphones, you would most likely record it all into separate tracks, yes. This means that you can individually edit and process each microphone. Using ten would create a lot of phase issues unless you're very careful with your placement.

Right now I'm working out a way of sending multiple tracks to different outboard devices (most likely another computer) using my Aux sends and then editing them and bouncing them down into Stereo to record directly into my DAW software. It's a work around until I get a proper interface, but I don't even record my drums often, I'm talking about my guitars. I play my electric in stereo.
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Old 12-24-2007, 08:55 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

If you want to get a more live acoustic sound quality, the configuration MFB and Osso12 mentioned works great--bass snare and two overheads. This will produce an honest recording of what the drums and cymbals REALLY sound like, as well as giving you some of the ambience from the room.

Using more mics (individual tom mics and more than two overheads) is usually reserved for when the sound is going to be altered or messed with using EQ, effects, etc. This will also produce more of an isolated "studio" sound--just the sound of the instruments without anything from the room.

A quick tip about overheads: Until recently, I thought that condenser mics were the only option for overheads, but I did a session the other day and the engineer used two ribbon mics as overheads. They worked great, with a warmer, more acoustic sound than condensers.
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  #5  
Old 12-25-2007, 04:02 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

So right now the recorder my group is using only has 2 inputs, so i can only use 2 mics, unless there's some kind of connector jack that allows more than one mic to be plugged into one input.

Should i just put the 2 mics overhead?

Or is there a better way to place them so that i can get every drum and cymbal in?
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Old 12-26-2007, 05:38 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

If your 8 channel has only 2 spare channels why not submix the drums? Connect the output of a small mixer dedicated to your drums into one of the spare channels on your main board.
Then you can run 4 mic setup as I think this is a “Minimum” setup. A Kick, snare and 2 overhead condensers. Pick up something with phantom power (like a PV6) for the condensers and your good to go.
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Old 12-26-2007, 11:53 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Yeah, you can't connect more than one microphone to one input, it would do horrible, horrible things to your gain levels. What I would do for a group recording (provided it were a rough group recording and not actually for a demo or an album) is to have two condenser microphones, one dedicated for the kit as an overhead and one for the rest of the band as an ambient microphone. Play with the placement. Dynamic microphones probably won't work too well for this, there won't be enough sensitivity. Also, trying to plug two condensers into one input would be quite funny for the Phantom Power requirement.

Unless I'm confusing myself, are you recording the whole band live or multitracking? If you're multitracking the kit, two condensers behind you in an XY Pair often works quite well and I've actually heard whole albums recorded this way.

Either use another mixer and submix them then run that mixer into your main board (allowing you to have more microphones), get a bigger board or run the overhead pair.
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  #8  
Old 12-26-2007, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Yeah i'm going to have to multi track the set. So what's the xy pair setup for mics? Sorry i dont record much so this is kind of confusing.
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  #9  
Old 12-26-2007, 06:51 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

First of all, what kind of equipment do you have right now? That'll help me help you to decide where to place your microphones.
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  #10  
Old 12-26-2007, 08:50 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

For recording the best cheapest Idea would probably get a mixer to plug into a computer and buy a set of mic's for youre drums..
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Old 12-26-2007, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Nowadays everyone with a computer wants to record....and that's fine, provided you do understand that you're not likely to get much in the way of quality results until you've paid your dues (as usual) ...it's akin to someone thinking that they can play guitar just because they have one.

Depending apon how serious you are you either need proffesional help from someone much more experienced than where you're coming from (you may have to pay for this ( it would be worth it and will get you the fastest results)... unless you know someone sympathetic to your cause who will help you gratis.

It's either that...or accept that you are probably not gonna get a recording that sounds very good for quite a while....during which time you should buy some books, CDs, DVDs and obtain a subscription to several recording magazines...figure out what you need in the way of gear and get it ...experiment.... make some horrible recordings.....learn, try to have fun and continue to experiment and "get good" with your gear, mic placement...etc..... and make (hopefully) better and better recordings as you go.....

actually i missed the first thing which is... Make sure you have some music worth recording in the first place then, at least it will make all the trouble and expense worth it in the end ...(again, hopefully) No Garantees..... Good Luck
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Old 12-27-2007, 12:57 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

I'm most likely going to be using an Alesis 8 channel mixer instead of that crappy fostex recorder, so now i can have 4 mics. I'm going to go with the basic snare, kick and 2 overhead mics. Where exactly should i have the overhead mics for the best sound?
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Old 12-27-2007, 05:41 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by svkelleher10 View Post
When recording on a set, which would use at least 5-10 mics, do you simply plug every mic into the recorder, and each mic lays down a seperate track? Or what? How does this work?
Since none really made it simple for ya; here ya go

Multi track recording is mostly done with a USB or FireWire connected mixer with a dedicated output per input on the mixer, it can also be done by setting the mics and their channels you wish to record to an Aux. out put and recording each output on a special recorder or on separate computers but you mostly will only find 2 Aux output on a 10-16 channel mixer


Multi tack capture device Link

You still can get a decent drum track recording on one channel, it just takes lots of trial and error with the mixing the gain and EQ knobs

Good luck to ya man, beware that you get what you pay for in the recording world. It will take much trial and error to get a good result.
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Old 12-27-2007, 05:52 AM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by svkelleher10 View Post
I'm most likely going to be using an Alesis 8 channel mixer instead of that crappy fostex recorder, so now i can have 4 mics. I'm going to go with the basic snare, kick and 2 overhead mics. Where exactly should i have the overhead mics for the best sound?
Eveyone is offering good advice, but I'd get the cheapest setup you can. I have a the little fostex 8 track, 2 tracks at a time. It works fairly well with two mics spaced equally apart several feet in front of the kit. I don't really care for the butt pain I have to go through to get the tracks from the recorder to the computer, and the flash card used for memory is pretty small. I wouldn't recommend it, but I have one so I'm stuck with it until I can justify something better. I would much rather have some sort of firewire program, and the hardware to support it to allow instant playback and mixing. Like one of those firepods, with at least 4 mic inputs would be nice.
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  #15  
Old 12-27-2007, 08:25 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by svkelleher10 View Post
I'm most likely going to be using an Alesis 8 channel mixer instead of that crappy fostex recorder, so now i can have 4 mics. I'm going to go with the basic snare, kick and 2 overhead mics. Where exactly should i have the overhead mics for the best sound?
I would stay fairly to the front of the kit (above bass drum) but spread outside more and up high. What kind of mic's are you thinking?
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  #16  
Old 12-27-2007, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Well for now i'm gonna have to go with dynamic mics because i'm short on money and can't afford condensers/ ribbons. So these mics aren't gonna be the best. I might go with snare, bass, and two overheads in an xy setup about 1 foot in front of the bass and 5 feet up.
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  #17  
Old 12-28-2007, 09:55 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FullerBrushMan View Post
actually i missed the first thing which is... Make sure you have some music worth recording in the first place then, at least it will make all the trouble and expense worth it in the end ...(again, hopefully) No Garantees..... Good Luck

I disagree with this. Any musician worth his salt should be at the very least recording his own playing, and have a working knowledge of how to make decent home recordings to include other instruments. Given the quality and range of home recording technology it's really not as daunting or as difficult as you may believe. Coming up with a thoroughly listenable demo really isn't akin to the time and dedication required to learn an instrument (although becoming a top notch engineer in a pro studio probably is;) )
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  #18  
Old 12-28-2007, 10:21 PM
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Default Re: Recording Drums....?

Look first off, cut the bullsh*t. It's a cover band. Our demo's are worth recording. So is everyone gonna argue about the ethics of recording, or would anyone like to help me out?
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