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  #361  
Old 07-15-2007, 03:18 AM
CJH2112 CJH2112 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I don't get people who need to be enlightened or have Neil Peart's greatness explained to them but I will bite:

Neil is not the greatest drummer in the world and HE would be the first to admit that. I don't believe there is such a thing but Neil is among the greatest drummers in history. If you look over his career and listened to his drumming you would hear his genius. I don't think playing drum solos defines ones '' greatness'' but Neil is one of the greatest soloist in the history of our instrument that is a fact. I can't breakdown to you any specifics harly_g on what makes Neil great or why you don't get his celebrity and why he is touted as one of the greats. You are entitled to your opinion and I am not flaming you. For me and many others, Neil is a major drumming influence and one of the best.
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  #362  
Old 07-15-2007, 03:50 AM
harley_g harley_g is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Thanks for those who've replied so far. And like youenjoy said his swing capabilities are mediocre at best (what is with that trigger big band finish at the end of his solo's?)

I will get a hold of La Villa Strangiato and see what he has to offer. But while we're on the topic of his playing with the rest of rush, I've seen videos of that too and I also just found his grooves to be boring (once again not to be mistaken with simplicity).
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Neil is not the greatest drummer in the world and HE would be the first to admit that. I don't believe there is such a thing but Neil is among the greatest drummers in history.
I never said he was or that even such a tag should exist. "The greatest drummer in the world" is just such a pathetic title, it really doesn't mean anything to me when someone throws it on a drummer. Has anyone heard every drummer in the world? No. Then there's the sheer vagueness of it, and the fact that so much of why a drummer is good or bad is due to taste or opinion. And I can't see why Neil is among the greatest (once again bad title), and this why I came here because Drummerworld is obviously the best place.

As for the rest of CJh2112's comments, I told you everything I thought and WHY I thought it, so to just see these huge statements like "Neil is one of the greatest soloists in the history of our instrument and that is a fact" means absolutely nothing. First off how could it be a fact? If we're gonna talk facts here, why not mention Gene Krupa. He made the drums a solo instrument; before him no one had heard of a drum solo. That's a fact. After going to such lengths to explain why he's a boring soloist, how could I believe that he's one the best with a statement like that? You didn't even give one reason. If you can't break down why he's so good then that's alright for you but I'm really trying to get some real answers here. But thanks for your reply :)

I'm not won over yet! :P
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  #363  
Old 07-15-2007, 04:58 AM
King Of Drums King Of Drums is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Honestly I think he's a good drummer. He can play in nearly all styles, I admit not always convincingly but he's still a great drummer. He plays a bit too busy imo but it suits the music of rush perfectly. The rhythm section of that band is tight. I couldn't imagine many other drummers that would fit the music like him. I can always identify a rush song by his drumming. He has very characteristic fills, and unique sounding toms.

If you think about his influence too... Do you know how many great drummers may have never started if it weren't for him? He inspired a whole new generation of drummers. There is a reason he is one of the most famous drummers to ever live. Overall I think he's a great drummer, highly overrated but hey a lot of worse drummers are too... I've never met him but I've seen a few interviews with him. Definitely not a stereotypical "rock star" at all.
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  #364  
Old 07-15-2007, 05:13 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by King Of Drums View Post
Definitely not a stereotypical "rock star" at all.
This is most definitely true-- name another rock lyricist of the last century who was inspired by the writing of Ayn Rand.

YEM
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  #365  
Old 07-15-2007, 05:29 AM
harley_g harley_g is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I listened to La Villa Strangiato and it's not a bad song. It has some alright grooves but honestly nothing special to me...plus the parts where he plays the groove on the toms to me sounds weak and doesn't back the guitar part in my opinion.

As for his influence he sure does have a lot, I guess I just can't really see why.

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Originally Posted by King Of Drums View Post
Overall I think he's a great drummer, highly overrated but hey a lot of worse drummers are too...
I think this just must be it, he's overrated by so many people. He's competent I'll give him that but I just don't hear anything special in his playing. Sorry! :P
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  #366  
Old 07-17-2007, 02:49 AM
graham rogers graham rogers is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

xanadau has a beautiful drum part as does jacob's ladder....
i think that if he is over rated it is probably because he has such an imposing personality rather than anything to do with his drumming.
i can see why some people might find him annoying.
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  #367  
Old 07-17-2007, 03:33 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by youenjoy00myself View Post
This is most definitely true-- name another rock lyricist of the last century who was inspired by the writing of Ayn Rand.

YEM
Neil is a fantastic drummer, but I really must say, I don't care for his lyrics. I personally think they're pretentious and often sound stilted.
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  #368  
Old 07-17-2007, 05:24 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by crumbdrums View Post
Neil is a fantastic drummer, but I really must say, I don't care for his lyrics. I personally think they're pretentious and often sound stilted.
I know better lyrics also... Being inspired by Ayn rand doesn't make you a good writer, it's just that I don't know another guy in a rock band who reads Ayn Rand.
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  #369  
Old 07-17-2007, 09:06 AM
LethalWolfe LethalWolfe is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Harley_g,

Here are a couple of reasons I admire, and enjoy, Neil Peart's drumming. To start with, it touches in me a place where good music (a subjective term I know) is supposed to touch you. Many of Rush's songs communicate to me on an emotional level like very few pieces of music do. I started listening to Rush before I knew who Rush was let alone who Neil Peart was. I fell it love w/it because I thought it was great, not because I had people telling me I'm supposed to think it's great. I think Neil, and Rush over all, has a very good balance between emotional and technical playing. As a whole it's technical enough to make you go, "wow", emotional enough to keep it from being "cold", and, most importantly, they play to serve the song.

I like Neil's solos (The Rhythm Method is still the best incarnation, IMO) because it feels like there is cohesive thread running thru the whole solo. A point, like he is trying to communicate something, tell a story, during his solo. If the story had a name I think it would be "A Brief History of Drumming in around 9 minutes." ;) Many of the other drum solos I've listened to feel hollow (like a visually stunning movie w/a lackluster plot). Neil's goal when building his drum solo was to make an homage, basically, to drumming. Parts of his solo are inspired by his many bicycle trips in Africa, his own version of "The Drum also Waltzes" is a tribute to Max Roach, and the swing section at the end is for the drummers he grew up listening to, like Buddy Rich. I think that personalization is what gives his solo the emotional undertone many others lack.

And about Neil's expression, that's just his "work face." Jordan stuck out his tongue, Namath wore a fur coat, Neil looks intense (which only helps cement "The Professor" as an appropriate nick name for him).


Lethal
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  #370  
Old 07-18-2007, 06:43 PM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I think the problem is w/age in most cases. Im 38, been playing for 20 years and Neil was HUGE in the 80's. He is my second biggest influence. First being Gregg Bissonette and third being Alex Van Halen. All guys big in the 80's. I said Influence. Not "Greatest ever" "Best to walk the Earth". Just who got me excited about playing. Now drummers are so advanced; Donati, Lang, Minimen, Greb, Jarzombek and the like. The more complicated the more people are impressed.
So as great a drummer Neil is for the band and what he has contributed to drums he is not at their level of playing. Gregg as well. Gregg is respected as a guy that can play just about anything. But basically (for the most part) its what is popular when you are growing up playing. And if Neil wasn't who you grew up listening to then you just dont get it.
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  #371  
Old 07-23-2007, 05:33 AM
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Mikecore Mikecore is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

How many drummer have a growth phase named after them?




(crickets chirping)


When we start hearing about "The ubiquitous Joey Jordison phase" , then we can raise questions about Neil's relevance to drumming.
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  #372  
Old 07-23-2007, 09:31 AM
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Dunnett Dunnett is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I don't think can really address your question without examining your operating paradigm, meaning, if you don't "get" Peart, if you are not impressed with his solos etc, then please provide an example of who DOES meet your criteria.
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  #373  
Old 07-24-2007, 04:01 PM
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Jason Dorn Jason Dorn is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Ok I have to chime in here. Peart is my favorite drummer this is true is he the most talented drummer in the world no is he the most glamourous no. But you know what neil does have that alot of technically better drummers don't ? Neil Peart has an understanding of what music fans not just other drummers will be able to relate to.

I have seen many "technically better" drummers perform solos that as a drummer blew my mind to look around in the crowd and see alot of people looking lost and start talking among themselves and lose interest in the solo go to the bathroom what not.

At a rush show the solo is a mesmerizing part of the show that leaves people amazed and interested. This is because he uses a simplicity that the music fan can relate to and builds around harmony melody and theme.

Do people who arent drummers see a Dave Weckl solo and go home saying omg did you see him do that triple flamadiddle inverted ratamacaca poo poo. No you dont and thats because thats lost on the average listener. They sure do remember the mallet cat the cowbell fills the big band break see it is able to be related to in a musical context.

Thats why so many other drummers with chops out the roof play clubs and smaller venues Because they arent as accesible they will draw the drummers and musicians out but for the most part it doesent have that widespread musical appeal.

So is Neil Peart the greatest soloist ever certainly not. But if you ask a rock fan who has seen Rush along with many other bands chances are they are going to be very impressed with Peart and remember him as an awesome drummer.

See thats why he has become such a big name people remember him because they can relate musically to what hes doing. I cant really think of another band that has had the sucsess that Rush has that when you mention the band the average music fan says oh yeah they have that insane drummer.

See thats what Peart does he transcends drumming he is an entertainer.
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  #374  
Old 07-24-2007, 04:44 PM
WarrenM WarrenM is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

What I really respect most about Peart is his attention to the craft. Watching 'A Work In Progress' and 'Anatomy of a Drum Solo", you really get a sense of how much he cares about drumming - it's history and it's applications. He's really technically minded but still realizes that it has to sound good to the crowd and grab them.

Neil is my drumming hero. Heh.
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  #375  
Old 07-24-2007, 05:20 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Very well put, Jason. I just saw Rush Friday night at the White River Amphitheater, and it was a great show! We've all heard the joke about the drum solo being "Bathroom-break time." Well, I can tell you that people were as enthusiastic about Peart's solo as any other part of the show. He got huge cheers from the crowd, and people watched the whole thing attentively. The place was packed, despite the rain, and it was a very fun crowd - everybody happy and energetic.

Frankly, I can appreciate the technicality of many great drummers' solos, but I truly do not enjoy most of them. In that way, I think I'm more like a non-drumming listener. But I enjoy Peart's solo at Rush shows. It's interesting, it moves, it is a true composition. Most technically complicated? Nah. Most fun for the general listener? Yeah, I believe so. At least that's what I've seen at all the Rush shows I've attended over the years.

If you don't get it, that's fine. There are certainly enough of us who do.
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  #376  
Old 07-25-2007, 12:32 AM
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Zumba_Zumba Zumba_Zumba is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I'm glad this discussion is going on. It gives me a chance to think of why I like Neil as a drummer so much. The point about the era and influences is great. I first listened to Joey Kramer and then Nicko. Then came Neil with his huge set up and "multi-percussive" approach to rock music. I have since moved on to Dennis Chambers and Lang.

Neil has applied new and exciting ways to play multiple parts to progressive rock anthems. Check out Xanadu, The Trees, Mystic Rhythms, Territories, Scars...these songs span decades and really show the creativity of Neil. People have to remember: Neil invented these parts. Anyone can sit there and copy it and say, "big deal". But try to invent something like what he has.

He really got me excited to play drums. I remember a Test for Echo show in Detroit with a sold out crowd clapping along to his electronic part leading to the "Scars" section. Afterward, the standing ovation was huge and minutes long. Great moment in my life.

He has influenced many people with more reasons than newer drummers may ever know. Discovery is a wonderful thing.
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  #377  
Old 07-25-2007, 01:45 PM
WarrenM WarrenM is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Anyone can sit there and copy it and say, "big deal". But try to invent something like what he has.
I think that hits the nail on the head. It's not the difficulty of playing the parts, it's the creation and writing of them. The innovative nature of it. That's what it takes to be inspiring, in my book, not simply speed of playing or difficulty of material.
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  #378  
Old 07-31-2007, 02:48 AM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zumba_Zumba View Post
. Anyone can sit there and copy it and say, "big deal". But try to invent something like what he has.
PLEASE READ IN FULL!
Absolutely true. And very over looked. I have thought this about Neil when people rag on him. People like to rag on him for what he CAN'T play that others can. So he may be stiff when he plays jazz. He tries. Or is not an independence wizard like, Lang, Bozzio, or Donati. He's not trying to be. Or trying to be Weckle, Colaiuta or Chambers. Thats like not liking a baseball catcher cause he cant pitch like the pitcher. News flash; He's not a pitcher he's a catcher. So WHY does Neil have to play like everyone else? And for Harley G; Listen to some RUSH cd's and dont Judge by a solo. That goes for Portnoy as well. Portnoy is one of the odd time masters.
One thing I know is, inventing a part that sticks is whats important. Think about this carefully;If any drummer walks into a drum shop and takes ONE, not two but One stick and plays the intro to "YYZ" with the bell of ONE cymbal not a whole drum kit, but one cymbal, EVERYONE will know EXACTLY what it is. No other drummer has ever done that. End of Story!
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  #379  
Old 07-31-2007, 02:51 AM
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ZildjianMan1023 ZildjianMan1023 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

neil peart is one of my greatest influences.. nuff said


Dom
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  #380  
Old 08-02-2007, 10:55 PM
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Zumba_Zumba Zumba_Zumba is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeybbdrummin View Post
Absolutely true. And very over looked. I have thought this about Neil when people rag on him. People like to rag on him for what he CAN'T play that others can. So he may be stiff when he plays jazz. He tries. Or is not an independence wizard like, Lang, Bozzio, or Donati. He's not trying to be. Or trying to be Weckle, Colaiuta or Chambers. Thats like not liking a baseball catcher cause he cant pitch like the pitcher. News flash; He's not a pitcher he's a catcher. So WHY does Neil have to play like everyone else? And for Harley G; Listen to some RUSH cd's and dont Judge by a solo. That goes for Portnoy as well. Portnoy is one of the odd time masters.
One thing I know is, inventing a part that sticks is whats important. Think about this carefully;If any drummer walks into a drum shop and takes ONE, not two but One stick and plays the intro to "YYZ" with the bell of ONE cymbal not a whole drum kit, but one cymbal, EVERYONE will know EXACTLY what it is. No other drummer has ever done that. End of Story!

I agree, he has not taken the interdependence to the level of Lang, Donati and Bozzio, but listen to some parts on the Hold Your Fire album (Tai Shan?) and Territories and Mystic Rhythms. His latest album actually has a song that is a remnant of that type of playing (drums only on his site if interested). When I read some posts that bash him I wonder if these people are/were listening to the same person I am/was. Neil was certainly more aggressive and very innovative back in the day. Later albums are not so special but their latest album reminds me of Counterparts.
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  #381  
Old 08-02-2007, 11:54 PM
mikeybbdrummin mikeybbdrummin is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Zumba_Zumba View Post
I agree, he has not taken the interdependence to the level of Lang, Donati and Bozzio, but listen to some parts on the Hold Your Fire album (Tai Shan?) and Territories and Mystic Rhythms. His latest album actually has a song that is a remnant of that type of playing (drums only on his site if interested). When I read some posts that bash him I wonder if these people are/were listening to the same person I am/was. Neil was certainly more aggressive and very innovative back in the day. Later albums are not so special but their latest album reminds me of Counterparts.
I think its an age thing, and knowing what makes a good drummer. Take a guy Like Keith Carlock and put him next to Virgil. Totaly different drummers. But would you (not you in particular) say Keith is not impressive? Doubtfull. Cause Neil is not doing "Multi Pedal Orchestration" does not not make him a bad drummer. Just as many if not more drummers have wanted to "Be" Neil then drummers have wanted to be Lang or Donati. To me Neil makes drummers want to be better drummers. While Lang, Donati Minnimen and the like(which I respect) make drummers want to be showoffs. Which takes away from being a team player.
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  #382  
Old 08-03-2007, 09:59 PM
drdrmmr drdrmmr is offline
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Default Neil Peart

peart is one of the the most creative drummers and he has absolutely precious playing. It would be better if he shows some smile :)
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  #383  
Old 08-04-2007, 08:57 AM
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Eye of the Beholder Eye of the Beholder is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I like his drumming but i think his fills are too predictable
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  #384  
Old 08-20-2007, 06:45 PM
mikei mikei is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Here is a great solo. Enjoy

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=a27_1187478156
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  #385  
Old 08-20-2007, 07:21 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Der Trommler is amazing. I can't see how anyone could watch that and say anything bad about the man's playing. :)
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  #386  
Old 08-21-2007, 02:35 AM
ManCannon ManCannon is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I don't want to ruffle anybody's feathers here but I always found Peart to be somewhat wooden and lacking in feel. Sure, he's technically great and creative but I just don't think he has much feel. Of course Rush/Peart fans think this is blasphemy...

I'll come right out and say it:

Peart is influential and really good, but his lack of feel knocks him considerable down on the list of greatest drummers ever.
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  #387  
Old 08-21-2007, 03:11 PM
WarrenM WarrenM is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Of course Rush/Peart fans think this is blasphemy...
Well, as you may or may not be aware, people often have differing opinions. You're entitled to yours but it doesn't make theirs wrong by extension.
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  #388  
Old 08-21-2007, 04:05 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by harley_g View Post
Hello everyone...thought I might bring up a thread that hasn't had a post for a while. I actually came on here quite a lot a while back but got busy so when I came back I couldn't get into my account...anyway. I come because something has been bothering me.

I have seen many a video of Peart. I wasn't blown away or anything, but I didn't mind him. But a visit to the good old YouTube and another watch of his solos and such, and I quickly became confused. Looking at the amount of people proclaiming that drums were invented for Peart, and that without a doubt he is the greatest drummer ever to live, I thought I was taking crazy pills. I was ALMOST drawn to start an argument and become like one of those losers who sit on YouTube and drone on and on about why Derek Roddy is so much better than Joey Jordison (they're both tasteless in my opinion but that's beside the point).

Every single solo I've seen of Peart immediately reminds me of solo's I would come up with when I'd been playing for 6 months to a year. Four on the floor, semiquavers on the snare with some triplets, and some tom fills. I'm not here to say I could school Peart in a battle or that he's crap or anything like that, I've just honestly been baffled by why people continue to be so amazed by stuff that many beginners come up with for their first solo. When I was in a Mike Mangini clinic he actually said that the whole four on the floor thing is a beginnerish thing (in the sense that it's what drummers start out with, not that it's bad or anything).

If I was playing stuff so similar to Peart after such a short while of playing and only being able to play a Go-Go's greatest hits album, how is he so good?

After roughly 8 minutes of soloing I saw a guy who looked uncomfortable and frankly unhappy (beside the point but it doesn't hurt to show some emotion...) and who could come up with nothing but basically what would usually be a rock fill played over and over again. It bored me to tears, not because it was simple (some of the best sounding licks I've heard are simple) but because it just seemed so repetitive and uncreative.

There's hardly any dynamic range in his soloing. For the best drummer in the world he sure doesn't show any contrast. I saw an old post on here saying how he leaves heaps of space and such in his solos...I could here no space except the space between his semiquavers and the time it took him to jump around to his electronic drum kit. So often in drumming less is more...

Which leads me to the next thing. He has such a big kit, but I just see him use it so uncreatively, it's honestly uninspiring. There are so many drummers out there who create just this amazing contrast and inventive grooves and patterns on a 4-piece, meanwhile Peart continues his long semiquaver tom roll. Bill Stewart, Brian Blade, JoJo Mayer (maybe a 5-piece but close enough), it goes on. While I'm at it I might offend any others who weren't already offended :P...I haven't been so bored or confused since I saw Mike Portnoy play his monster kit.

I've tried to take the high road here folks because I've thought long and hard and I've come up with nothing except that the people who like him can only appreciate big drum kits and loud playing. I know this can't be true so I MUST be missing something. I just don't get it.

Enlighten me!

Harley
Well I'd say that you need to look a little closer then my friend because most of the time not just one thing is going on at once. Like when he's playing the waltz section, have you actually tried to do that without a little practice. Not very easy from my experience. Also, if you are so educated then you would have found a full coverage of his Anatomy of a Drum Solo DVD. No? In fact just watch what the snipits we have here on DW, and see for yourself. Hopefully you will begin to see the clearer picture as to how his solo was meant to be, a tribute to drumming in general and his progression through that world.

It also confuses me when you compare him to people such as Jojo and Brian Blade. Last I checked they don't even play his style of music. I tend to believe that your taste in music has biased this opinion. As for the large kit thing too, listen to his new song Malignant Narcissism, that was played on a 5 piece. No long tom rolls, none of his "untasteful" use of so many drums, just one solid instrumental track.

Also, remember that a solo isn't the image of a drummers talent. If thats all you listen to then you really need to take a step back and do some more research because you've missed some pretty good stuff (ex. Mike Portnoy, I agree the solos are poor but the tracks he produces are much better).

Hope you're enlightened.
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  #389  
Old 08-23-2007, 09:20 AM
WhereDoEaglesDare? WhereDoEaglesDare? is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by michael drums View Post
Oh, THANKS xush!! Nice!!

Though...it cuts out and stops at 48 seconds, and it says that it's 5:15 long?? That seems kinda strange, huh?

Anyway...Thanks for that...Play On! ;-)
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Ok I have to chime in here. Peart is my favorite drummer this is true is he the most talented drummer in the world no is he the most glamourous no. But you know what neil does have that alot of technically better drummers don't ? Neil Peart has an understanding of what music fans not just other drummers will be able to relate to.

I have seen many "technically better" drummers perform solos that as a drummer blew my mind to look around in the crowd and see alot of people looking lost and start talking among themselves and lose interest in the solo go to the bathroom what not.

At a rush show the solo is a mesmerizing part of the show that leaves people amazed and interested. This is because he uses a simplicity that the music fan can relate to and builds around harmony melody and theme.

Do people who arent drummers see a Dave Weckl solo and go home saying omg did you see him do that triple flamadiddle inverted ratamacaca poo poo. No you dont and thats because thats lost on the average listener. They sure do remember the mallet cat the cowbell fills the big band break see it is able to be related to in a musical context.

Thats why so many other drummers with chops out the roof play clubs and smaller venues Because they arent as accesible they will draw the drummers and musicians out but for the most part it doesent have that widespread musical appeal.

So is Neil Peart the greatest soloist ever certainly not. But if you ask a rock fan who has seen Rush along with many other bands chances are they are going to be very impressed with Peart and remember him as an awesome drummer.

See thats why he has become such a big name people remember him because they can relate musically to what hes doing. I cant really think of another band that has had the sucsess that Rush has that when you mention the band the average music fan says oh yeah they have that insane drummer.

See thats what Peart does he transcends drumming he is an entertainer.
good post man i completly agree
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  #390  
Old 08-25-2007, 09:52 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I saw Neil from the 10th row last night in St. Louis on the Snakes and Arrows tour and it was as usual.....inspiring! Neil plays with so much intesity but that can only be seen in his face because he plays in such a relaxed fasion. They played a lot from the new album and that was ok with me, I like the new album a lot. I have seen them do the old stuff enough that seeing the new material played is very refreshing. Being so close I never really saw any other part ot the show...my eyes were on Neil the whole show. It was awesome!!
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Old 09-02-2007, 06:08 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I have been listening to Peart for 25 years. I've seen Rush 5 times and every time I was blown away. I graduated the year Moving Pictures came out and that album changed my life. Neil is a true innovator.

Neil plays the exact lick one would expect in the Rush "hits." However, when the band jumps into a jam (like La Villa S.), anything can happen. They break sections down and improvise with the best of them. I understand people not getting into Geddy Lee's voice or not liking Rush's sound but it's a bit short sighted to just say "ahh I don't get it." Try this, have you a nice fat steak for dinner (with a juicy Cabernet), dim the lights, and relax with your significant other while listening to Permanent Waves uncut. Hallalueja!
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Old 09-02-2007, 06:25 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by slingerland755 View Post
I have been listening to Peart for 25 years. I've seen Rush 5 times and every time I was blown away. I graduated the year Moving Pictures came out and that album changed my life. Neil is a true innovator.

Neil plays the exact lick one would expect in the Rush "hits." However, when the band jumps into a jam (like La Villa S.), anything can happen. They break sections down and improvise with the best of them. I understand people not getting into Geddy Lee's voice or not liking Rush's sound but it's a bit short sighted to just say "ahh I don't get it." Try this, have you a nice fat steak for dinner (with a juicy Cabernet), dim the lights, and relax with your significant other while listening to Permanent Waves uncut. Hallalueja!
...or Hemispheres!

Play On! ;-)
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  #393  
Old 09-02-2007, 06:48 AM
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You're exactly right!
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Old 09-03-2007, 05:31 AM
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[quote=WhereDoEaglesDare?;351310]good post man i completly agree[/QUOTE
Dude, you took the words right out of my mouth.
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  #395  
Old 09-13-2007, 03:43 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Happy 55th Birthday Neil! I heard you had a killer show on Saturday, but I wasn't able to attend. Hope you can keep rockin' for another 55.
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  #396  
Old 09-13-2007, 05:26 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Happy Birthday, Professor!

Here's to another 55, Mr. Peart...


Play On! :-)
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Old 09-16-2007, 05:55 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Drummer30 View Post
Well I'd say that you need to look a little closer then my friend because most of the time not just one thing is going on at once. Like when he's playing the waltz section, have you actually tried to do that without a little practice. Not very easy from my experience. Also, if you are so educated then you would have found a full coverage of his Anatomy of a Drum Solo DVD. No? In fact just watch what the snipits we have here on DW, and see for yourself. Hopefully you will begin to see the clearer picture as to how his solo was meant to be, a tribute to drumming in general and his progression through that world.

It also confuses me when you compare him to people such as Jojo and Brian Blade. Last I checked they don't even play his style of music. I tend to believe that your taste in music has biased this opinion. As for the large kit thing too, listen to his new song Malignant Narcissism, that was played on a 5 piece. No long tom rolls, none of his "untasteful" use of so many drums, just one solid instrumental track.

Also, remember that a solo isn't the image of a drummers talent. If thats all you listen to then you really need to take a step back and do some more research because you've missed some pretty good stuff (ex. Mike Portnoy, I agree the solos are poor but the tracks he produces are much better).

Hope you're enlightened.
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Hello everyone...thought I might bring up a thread that hasn't had a post for a while. I actually came on here quite a lot a while back but got busy so when I came back I couldn't get into my account...anyway. I come because something has been bothering me.

I have seen many a video of Peart. I wasn't blown away or anything, but I didn't mind him. But a visit to the good old YouTube and another watch of his solos and such, and I quickly became confused. Looking at the amount of people proclaiming that drums were invented for Peart, and that without a doubt he is the greatest drummer ever to live, I thought I was taking crazy pills. I was ALMOST drawn to start an argument and become like one of those losers who sit on YouTube and drone on and on about why Derek Roddy is so much better than Joey Jordison (they're both tasteless in my opinion but that's beside the point).

Every single solo I've seen of Peart immediately reminds me of solo's I would come up with when I'd been playing for 6 months to a year. Four on the floor, semiquavers on the snare with some triplets, and some tom fills. I'm not here to say I could school Peart in a battle or that he's crap or anything like that, I've just honestly been baffled by why people continue to be so amazed by stuff that many beginners come up with for their first solo. When I was in a Mike Mangini clinic he actually said that the whole four on the floor thing is a beginnerish thing (in the sense that it's what drummers start out with, not that it's bad or anything).

If I was playing stuff so similar to Peart after such a short while of playing and only being able to play a Go-Go's greatest hits album, how is he so good?

After roughly 8 minutes of soloing I saw a guy who looked uncomfortable and frankly unhappy (beside the point but it doesn't hurt to show some emotion...) and who could come up with nothing but basically what would usually be a rock fill played over and over again. It bored me to tears, not because it was simple (some of the best sounding licks I've heard are simple) but because it just seemed so repetitive and uncreative.

There's hardly any dynamic range in his soloing. For the best drummer in the world he sure doesn't show any contrast. I saw an old post on here saying how he leaves heaps of space and such in his solos...I could here no space except the space between his semiquavers and the time it took him to jump around to his electronic drum kit. So often in drumming less is more...

Which leads me to the next thing. He has such a big kit, but I just see him use it so uncreatively, it's honestly uninspiring. There are so many drummers out there who create just this amazing contrast and inventive grooves and patterns on a 4-piece, meanwhile Peart continues his long semiquaver tom roll. Bill Stewart, Brian Blade, JoJo Mayer (maybe a 5-piece but close enough), it goes on. While I'm at it I might offend any others who weren't already offended :P...I haven't been so bored or confused since I saw Mike Portnoy play his monster kit.

I've tried to take the high road here folks because I've thought long and hard and I've come up with nothing except that the people who like him can only appreciate big drum kits and loud playing. I know this can't be true so I MUST be missing something. I just don't get it.

Enlighten me!

Harley
Hello all, newly joined on this forum but have been reading for a while. Interesting that of course everyone has and is entitiled to an opinion and I guess thats the purpose here. However, being that I am a big Rush/Neil fan etc. and drummer from many years back it astonishes me the amount of bashing going on.It's easy to say a part is easy to play once it has been figured out, but lets give credit to the creation/invention of the part and song. In other words, so you can copy it ? But can you create it ? And seeing that your such an expert who are you ? What qualifies you to be the judge ?
It will always be debateable that there are many great drummers out there how does one really qualify who is the "best" Its all a matter of opinion, right ?
So in my humble opinion Neil has made a great contribution to the drumming community over the years, he is certainly been an inspiration across the board. When I go to a Rush show I too notice how many people in the audience actually really pay attention and enjoy his solo's. They are very creative, original and musical. As we say here amongst our friends "no one plays like Neil" He's certainly up there among the best, and i admire the man for his accomplishments.
Happy Birthday !!
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  #398  
Old 10-16-2007, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I've been a fan of Neil's since I started playing drums - in fact, he was probably the reason I started my music career 25 years ago! My avatar is actually one of two postcards that I had received from Neil in response to "ask a pro" letters I had sent years ago. In spite of my admiration for and inspiration from Neil, I am not a fan that bows to every single note he plays. I can be equally critical of certain aspects of his playing. HOWEVER, I think most criticisms miss the point when they say "his stuff isn't that hard to play." Neil makes music - he plays as a contributor and supporting member of his band. He is not in the business of just creating the most difficult drum fill to play or the craziest odd time groove ever committed. Even his solo is created in a musical sense and is appropriate for the venue it is performed in - large arenas filled with Rock fans. Perhaps it would be different if Neil had developed playing jazz clubs for the past 33 years... Neil is humbly inspired by the masters of drumming history and modern monsters - and he writes about how he wishes he could play like them.

I was thinking about differences in approach between a modern rock master, such as Gavin Harrison, and Neil. Gavin's approach to fills is much more rooted in improvisation - and this, while usually always very impressive, has mixed results. My humble criticism of Gavin's approach would be that his fills almost become interchangeable. You could almost take that massive fill in "Fear of a Blank Planet" and cut and paste it into "Anesthetize" with only a few die hards would notice. On the other hand, Neil's well thought-out fills and patterns almost become part of the melody of the song - it is this aspect that gives many of Neil's drum parts so much personality. Both are valid approaches, with pros and cons.

The fact remains that Neil has been a huge inspiration to a whole generation of Rock drummers, and he, along with Rush, have had a amazing 33 year career (!) of making very creative music that has defined it's own style.
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  #399  
Old 10-23-2007, 09:10 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I saw Rush last friday for the first time, in Oberhausen, Germany, and it was soooo awesome !!! Expected a lot, and got more than that ! Played all their classic hits and lots of Snakes & Arrows, these songs really kick live ! Animations on the video screens were just RAD ! Awesome, especially the south park one going straight into Tom Sawyer.

Some parts of Neils Solo were exactly like the R30 one, but with kinda other samples in the E-Solo. His red kit looks killer and he played fantastic, so did Geddy and Alex. It was a special night for me, wich I won´t forget too fast !
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Old 12-03-2007, 05:55 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by the skin man View Post
Drummers like Dennis Chambers, Dave Weckl, Vinnie Colaiuta, Adam Nussbaum, Chad Wackerman and Jack DeJohnette completely and totally blow Neil Peart away. It doesn't matter if they're not rock drummers and he is. Neil Peart has to be one of the most overrated drummers of all time. I'd bet at least one in five drummers that graduates from the Berklee of music every year can do everything that Neil Peart can do including the odd time. The only difference is he's in huge band that's been huge for a long time and they're not.
they couldnt blow him away in RUSH!!! only one great drummer for RUSH!!!excluding rutsy, and thats NEIL PEART baby
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