DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drum Gear > Other Gear

Other Gear Discuss Hardware and all other equipment not covered in the other topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-03-2007, 05:40 AM
DrummerGuy75 DrummerGuy75 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 15
Default Recording.

Hey well I've been playing the drums for about two years now and I really love this instrument. I wanted to get some recording stuff together so I can record what I play to cd's. I'm wondering whats the best stuff for recording just for the drums nothing else. I've looked around for things like this and it all confuses me alot so if someone could elighten me to this part of drumming I'd be very appreciative.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-03-2007, 06:18 AM
lycandrummer lycandrummer is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: los angeles suburbs ca
Posts: 18
Default Re: Recording.

unfortunately..i dont blame you in the least for being confused, drums afterall arent like a guitar where you just plug it in and go if you need too..you have to think about microphones, a mixer, some sort of recording device..in a way, recording drums is one of the hardest thing engineers do..so as a newby to it, lets break it down.

First, get your drums tuned how you think they should sound..and then have others listen to them, preferably ones who know a good drum sound from a crummy one. You can not record a good sound if the drum itself doesnt sing to its full potential.

Secondly, think about microphones, there are many differing techniques to get the drums miced up, there is the simple two mics overhead, the four mics, two overheads, one snare, and one kick drum, and the complex but overall better way, micing the individual drums and then having two overheads to pick up the cymbals.

Thankfully, companies like cad and samson make cheap drum microphone packages, that, while not studio grade or maybe even considered good equipment, will get the job done for 200 bucks or less, and we are talking a microphone for kick, snare, three toms and two overheads, for 200 dollars or so.

If you can find these locally on craigslist or the recycler than more power to you because people buy them, then upgrade, and then people like myself, and maybe you, get a nice deal in the process.

Third thing, is a mixer, doesnt have to be a large one, doesnt even have to be a wellknown or new one, barenger and cheaper yamah mixers come to mind. All you'd ever need for 90 percent of drum sets is an eight channel mixer, barenger sells one for 80 bucks brand new, and it does lots of good things.

Finally, think recording, do you have an old minidisk player, or a computer that will record directly from its line input? if so your good to go, otherwise you'll want a little tascam portastudio or some sort of hand held small recording device, but overall recording direct to the computer is much easier and more practical.

We can get into the technical/sound design side of this later, but for now do some equipment research on some of the mic packages mixers etc i've mentioned.
__________________
pearl, tama, zildgian and rimo, tools of my trade
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-03-2007, 06:59 AM
DrummerGuy75 DrummerGuy75 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 15
Default Re: Recording.

Hey thanks for the info I looked those up and the price range is perfect for me and it looks alright. I was just wondering I'm planning on getting a laptop so I can have it by my side near my drum set I was wondering what laptop do you think is preferred most and what kind of software would be good to start off with.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-04-2007, 02:54 AM
DrummerGuy75 DrummerGuy75 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 15
Default Re: Recording.

Anyone else with advice.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-04-2007, 03:06 AM
Mediocrefunkybeat
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Recording.

Laptop-wise, in terms of off-the-shelf, something with a very high level of RAM and a decent processor and HDD should be reasonable. I'm a Mac user, and I'd recommend one of the MacBook or MacBook pros to you, but they're expensive and it's unlikely you'd want to spend that much on a laptop. Dells occasionally suffer from ground loops, so bear that in mind if you're thinking of going down that route.

As for software, the World is your oyster. There are lots of options, being a Mac user I use Logic 7 Express, but there's a lot to choose from. Some of the more famous options are ProTools (an integrated system, quite expensive) Sonar and Cubase. There are a lot more DAW's out there as well. You'd also have to consider an audio interface. I'm a fan of the PreSonus FirePod, and I'm going to purchase one sooner or later. They work with a firewire connection, so make sure that you can expand your laptop to have one. Failing that, I'm sure there are plenty of USB interfaces out there as well.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-04-2007, 03:33 AM
d.c.drummer's Avatar
d.c.drummer d.c.drummer is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,568
Default Re: Recording.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lycandrummer View Post
unfortunately..i dont blame you in the least for being confused, drums afterall arent like a guitar where you just plug it in and go if you need too..you have to think about microphones, a mixer, some sort of recording device..in a way, recording drums is one of the hardest thing engineers do..so as a newby to it, lets break it down.

First, get your drums tuned how you think they should sound..and then have others listen to them, preferably ones who know a good drum sound from a crummy one. You can not record a good sound if the drum itself doesnt sing to its full potential.

Secondly, think about microphones, there are many differing techniques to get the drums miced up, there is the simple two mics overhead, the four mics, two overheads, one snare, and one kick drum, and the complex but overall better way, micing the individual drums and then having two overheads to pick up the cymbals.

Thankfully, companies like cad and samson make cheap drum microphone packages, that, while not studio grade or maybe even considered good equipment, will get the job done for 200 bucks or less, and we are talking a microphone for kick, snare, three toms and two overheads, for 200 dollars or so.

If you can find these locally on craigslist or the recycler than more power to you because people buy them, then upgrade, and then people like myself, and maybe you, get a nice deal in the process.

Third thing, is a mixer, doesnt have to be a large one, doesnt even have to be a wellknown or new one, barenger and cheaper yamah mixers come to mind. All you'd ever need for 90 percent of drum sets is an eight channel mixer, barenger sells one for 80 bucks brand new, and it does lots of good things.

Finally, think recording, do you have an old minidisk player, or a computer that will record directly from its line input? if so your good to go, otherwise you'll want a little tascam portastudio or some sort of hand held small recording device, but overall recording direct to the computer is much easier and more practical.

We can get into the technical/sound design side of this later, but for now do some equipment research on some of the mic packages mixers etc i've mentioned.
Great Post... nothing more to add other than when you go to make your purchase, don't let the salesman who runs on commission push you around. Preferably take someone experienced with you, if not research this site and many others so you are well versed before spending your cash.
__________________
Take a look at my new stuff. http://drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25183
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-04-2007, 03:41 AM
hawk9290's Avatar
hawk9290 hawk9290 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Tempe, AZ/Columbus, OH/Punta Gorda, Fl
Posts: 1,054
Default Re: Recording.

I recommend Mac's for any a/v work; Windows really shows its instability when working with audio on it (you can still do it just fine, but save every few minutes).

Hardware/software wise- digital recording is the way to go now- its much easier and more expansive than a 24 input analog mixer and a 24 track recorder with 10 different external effects processors and all that crap- instead you just need one audio interface.

I tend to side with Pro Tools (MFB might remember that discussion lol). I find it intuitive, extremely productive, and you can take your files to any high end professional studio and they will be able to work with them there as well. However, you do have to buy a package deal moreless. If you go the ProTools route, I would recommend getting an M-Audio Lightbridge, M-Powered ProTools LE, and a PreSonus Digimax 8 channel preamp (just about any 8 channel preamp will work as long as it has ADAT lightpipe output). There are other ways to do it, but this will get you everything you need for about $1000. The other choice I would consider is getting the M-Audio ProjectMix IO board, which also gives you the 8 input channels, as well as an external mixing interface so that you can get a more hands on approach- this will run about $1100.
The advantage of the Lightbridge method is that you can expand it up to 32 simultaneous channels- the Project Mix can only go up to 16. However, you could get the Project Mix now, and then later intergrate it into a Lightbridge system. This is your best option as it will still give you the 8 inputs and external audio interface now, and you can expand it later to 32 simultaneous channels.


Of course, products like Logic, Cubase, etc will work too, and are not as expensive and are more compatible with other products (mackie, tascam, presonus, etc)- ProTools only works with M-Audio and Digidesign external interfaces (though if you use an ADAT lightpipe you can run virtually anything into it if you have the right connections). Logic and other programs will give you everything you need and you won't be displeased with them- in fact for my home use I use MAGIX Music Studio 2005, which is just some cheap software that was rebated for free- gets everything done and works great. ProTools is the industry standard though, and is universally accepted.


Now I realize this is a lot to understand, and thats why I would strongly recommend taking an audio recording/engineering course if you have one availible in your area. It will do you a world of benefit.
__________________
"When I hear music, I fear no danger. I am invulnerable. I see no foe."- Henry Thoreau
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-04-2007, 06:25 AM
DrummerGuy75 DrummerGuy75 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 15
Default Re: Recording.

Ok, when I get a mic kit and the mixer will I need any special wires or will they be included with the set.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-04-2007, 08:07 AM
Skitch's Avatar
Skitch Skitch is offline
Pioneer Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Nashville
Posts: 2,737
Default Re: Recording.

Great advice guys and I am referring to this link myself!

Mike

http://www.mikemccraw.com
http://www.dominoretroplate.com

http://www.youtube.com/drummermikemccraw
http://www.myspace.com/drummermikemccraw
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-04-2007, 09:59 PM
hawk9290's Avatar
hawk9290 hawk9290 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Tempe, AZ/Columbus, OH/Punta Gorda, Fl
Posts: 1,054
Default Re: Recording.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerGuy75 View Post
Ok, when I get a mic kit and the mixer will I need any special wires or will they be included with the set.
you will need XLR cable to go from the mics to mixer, and then you will need 1/4" TRS cables to go from the mixer to the recoring device. thats at a minimum- if you put in monitors, headphone amps, external effects processors, etc, you will need more cables, but thats more complicated stuff that you won't need now...
As a general rule, unless it tells you the cables are included, then they are not.
__________________
"When I hear music, I fear no danger. I am invulnerable. I see no foe."- Henry Thoreau
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com