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  #161  
Old 07-30-2010, 04:00 PM
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MisterMixelpix MisterMixelpix is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

That's how I look at it.

I'm a player with less than a year experience under his belt. I've had people ask me why I've spent so much on my kit. My answer's pretty simple: I have the money and I want it.
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  #162  
Old 07-31-2010, 12:35 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

I have some extremely expensive gear and some not so expensive gear. Lately we've played a lot more stuff that was backlined than stuff that wasn't. I probably get to use my own gear <50% of the time now. What is a lot of fun is finding the way the backlined drumset wants to be played. A drumset is a lot like a cat. Every cat wants to be pet a certain way and if you find that way, you'll have a great relationship. All that being said, I still prefer my Sonors.
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  #163  
Old 07-31-2010, 02:13 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

As someone who was born in the 60s, what I find interesting about it is that the "entry" level sets available today from companies like Ludwig, Tama, Sonor, Gretsch, etc. are at least as good as the best stuff you could get in the 60s and 70s, and the hardware on the budget sets today is actually far better (well, as long as better for you is "stands you could probably hang an elephant from") than the top of the line hardware from that era.

Also, drum companies only figured out later that they should have sets available at many different price points, so that you'd have to keep "upgrading". Of course, now you can also get all kinds of exotic woods, different kinds of plated hardware, etc., that you just couldn't get in the 70s. But the kits we had back then were good enough for the best drummers then.

I also play bass and keyboards professionally. Especially with basses, there's a similar situation with basses available at many different price points, and some of the "cheap ones"--like Fender Squiers that I've played, sound and play just as nice as basses that cost thousands of dollars more.

The manufacturers, instrument retailers, etc. would like you to feel pressured to keep up with the Joneses and make sure you've got the right status symbol. But you don't have to conform to that.
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  #164  
Old 07-31-2010, 03:03 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewBillfold View Post
As someone who was born in the 60s, what I find interesting about it is that the "entry" level sets available today from companies like Ludwig, Tama, Sonor, Gretsch, etc. are at least as good as the best stuff you could get in the 60s and 70s, and the hardware on the budget sets today is actually far better (well, as long as better for you is "stands you could probably hang an elephant from") than the top of the line hardware from that era.

Also, drum companies only figured out later that they should have sets available at many different price points, so that you'd have to keep "upgrading". Of course, now you can also get all kinds of exotic woods, different kinds of plated hardware, etc., that you just couldn't get in the 70s. But the kits we had back then were good enough for the best drummers then.

I also play bass and keyboards professionally. Especially with basses, there's a similar situation with basses available at many different price points, and some of the "cheap ones"--like Fender Squiers that I've played, sound and play just as nice as basses that cost thousands of dollars more.

The manufacturers, instrument retailers, etc. would like you to feel pressured to keep up with the Joneses and make sure you've got the right status symbol. But you don't have to conform to that.
That I can agree with!
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  #165  
Old 07-31-2010, 04:44 AM
picklebarrel picklebarrel is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

I upgraded my kit from a tama rockstar to gretsch new classics about two years ago. I am happy with the new classics but I've gotten the urge to put some new heads on my rockstar and use them in different band situations. I used the kick the other day because I didn't want to transport my other one and I was really impressed by the way it sounded. I guess one thing I didn't account for was that I didn't know too much about drums when I was really rockin on my rockstar set...in essence they probably sounded shitty because I didn't know how to tune them and didn't replace my heads as much as I should have.

And Brew, I've heard that about the basses a few times in the past few weeks. Definitely cool because I'm looking to get into bass; any squier that I should be looking into?
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  #166  
Old 07-31-2010, 11:51 PM
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Watermelon Stripes Watermelon Stripes is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRUNTERSDAD View Post
As I said previously, we can all find exceptions to all things. My brother-in-law sold Mercedes Benz for 25 years and 75 percent of his clients were doctors..
Indeed. But it *is* a far leap to assume that all doctors drive expensive cars based on the observations of one car dealership.

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...but I was trying to make a point that some want to nit-pick.
Not nit-picking--I'm sorry you feel that way
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  #167  
Old 08-01-2010, 12:02 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

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Originally Posted by Watermelon Stripes View Post
Indeed. But it *is* a far leap to assume that all doctors drive expensive cars based on the observations of one car dealership.



Not nit-picking--I'm sorry you feel that way
And as I mentioned elsewhere I work at a hospital and the Dr's parking lot is not full of Chevy's. Whatever.
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  #168  
Old 08-01-2010, 03:16 AM
NYDRUMMA NYDRUMMA is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

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Originally Posted by GRUNTERSDAD View Post
And as I mentioned elsewhere I work at a hospital and the Dr's parking lot is not full of Chevy's. Whatever.
My father in law was a doctor and he drove whatever got him from A to B. You see he spent his money on his kids college tuition, and weddings and down payments on their houses. He was incredibly smart with his money. He invested in things that made him more money... not less.

I don't get this expensive car for a doctor argument. A car is one of the worst investments in the world and has nothing to do with being a Dr. It would be different if instead of using a scalpel he decided to use a razor in order to save money. This argument has no bearing on drums. The drums are a tool that you use to make your living.

How about this instead for an argument. Golf clubs. I can play with budget golf clubs and not really have any impact on my score. Tiger Woods probably would lose a little if he used my clubs. But honestly, how much? For him because he is one of the best in the world my clubs would cost him at most 1 stroke on his average. But that stroke would be huge. It would drop him several spots in rankings and cost him earnings.Then there is the money he would lose for not being endorsed by Nike.

I guess what I am getting at is unless you are truly one of the best and have endorsements and don't pay for your set anyways, your 5,000 drum set is a bad investment.

However there is always the ignorant who assume because you play with Callaway clubs that you must be good. The same for drums. That guy owns a DW he must be a great player. You can never fix those people. If I played a DW it would sound like super heated trash. But some would assume that I can play like the best....
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  #169  
Old 08-01-2010, 03:29 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

The funny thing, is many high end kits are sold to Doctors, lawyers, and such, who just want a nice kit because they can.
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  #170  
Old 08-01-2010, 04:44 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Being a doctor, unlike a drummer, there is a certain status in the community that is assumed and a doctor driving a Mercedes will gain more status and be looked up to in the community. I'm not saying it's right but true. drummers who buy expensive drum sets are hoping for that same status. because five people on this websites have dads or uncles that are doctors and drive Chevys does not changes this view, which is the main sublect of this thread, not what kind of car a doctor drives. people buy expensive Rolex watches not to tell time but because they like nice things and because they can afford it. if you can't afford to buy expensive things, or choose not to that's fine. if you choose to to buy only American that is your choice also. a lot of people buy nice things because they last longer, re- sell better and in most cases look better and more importantly because they WANT to.
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  #171  
Old 08-01-2010, 07:49 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

The only status that counts is that which is afforded by the strongest musicians in your community. Cats with 10K rigs and no skills are laughed at. You read all the threads here about people asking why their kits don't sound good and they fail to realize that they haven't yet developed the touch and control to make it sound good. They think great kit = great sound and that is such a fail. Even a less expensive kit and cymbals can be made to sound good by a great player.

I especially don't see the difference when people are talking about heavily amplified music and drum sounds. It matters less when all you are doing is bashing and turning things up as loud as possible. The size of the drum and how it is miked makes more difference here than the tone coming out of it. Leave tone for jazz and music that actually makes use of it.

Not downing on metal/heavy rock (I play it, listen to it, love it), but lets get real.
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  #172  
Old 08-01-2010, 08:03 AM
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

I worked very hard all my life and now it's time to splurge a bit. Although I base all my instrument purchases primarily on their sound and secondly on their aesthetics, I won't let the cost of something impede me from getting what I truly want, within reason. I couldn't afford to do this thirty or forty years ago. Will a one thousand dollar kit get me through my sessions, probably so. But it won't put the smile on my face from the pure enjoyment that a two or three thousand dollar kit could do. I don't smoke or drink and my girlfriend won't let me keep any loose women around the house, so drums are the next best thing, lol. When you enjoy what you're playing, I really believe you can play better. It's imperative that I have to enjoy the kits I play because there are some days that I'm behind them eight or ten hours.

Now I'll go back to my 2003 Mustang.

Dennis
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  #173  
Old 08-01-2010, 04:13 PM
JohnPloughman JohnPloughman is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

I am not a working drummer. I dont play sessions. . And frankly, Im not that good.

I could probably get by with a cheap kit, midlevel cymbals.


But I dont have to. And I can afford not to. And besides..... I like the drums I have.
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  #174  
Old 08-03-2010, 05:00 AM
jenner jenner is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRUNTERSDAD View Post
Being a doctor, unlike a drummer, there is a certain status in the community that is assumed and a doctor driving a Mercedes will gain more status and be looked up to in the community. I'm not saying it's right but true.
You know this because you're a doctor or just because you make stuff up? People buy extravagant things usually because they either have low self esteem or they're the kind of pretentious losers who think things are automatically better if they cost more.
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  #175  
Old 08-03-2010, 05:04 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

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Originally Posted by jenner View Post
People buy extravagant things usually because they either have low self esteem or they're the kind of pretentious losers who think things are automatically better if they cost more.
Really? Always? All people? Including me?

One word..........BOLLOCKS!!

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  #176  
Old 08-03-2010, 05:40 AM
jenner jenner is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

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Originally Posted by Pocket-full-of-gold View Post
Really? Always? All people? Including me?
One word..........BOLLOCKS!!
Welcome to Drummerworld.
Yes I know, I was being sarcastic. It was a satire on the other guy's sweeping statement. It never ceases to amaze me how many people think they know everything about everyone. I haven't seen any large scale surveys asking why Mercedes owners finally decided on their purchase, but I doubt most of them would say "status symbol". And thanks for the welcome.
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  #177  
Old 08-03-2010, 05:46 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Quote:
Originally Posted by jenner View Post
I haven't seen any large scale surveys asking why Mercedes owners finally decided on their purchase, but I doubt most of them would say "status symbol". And thanks for the welcome.
Some want the status, undoubtedly.......others just want a quality engineered car, they are prepared to and can afford to, pay for it. Same goes for drums. More power to them, I say.

No worries. I'm sure you'll enjoy it here.
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  #178  
Old 08-03-2010, 05:58 AM
ccsimms ccsimms is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

i still feel like if you put a good chunk o' $ into a product, you'll get somethin' good. whether it's what you want or works for you depends on the circumstances but there's alot of high quality products being manufactured out there
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  #179  
Old 10-10-2017, 03:25 AM
bmm71 bmm71 is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

This was exactly the post I needed today, as I've been thinking about buying a new drum kit.

On a side note, I bought a great 5 piece Corders kit in 1991 that still sounds great today. I had wanted to add drums on to it, but the company that owns the currently drum shell design (Fibes) has been dormant for the past 10+ years, with the owner announcing the same broken-record statement of the company starting up in the near future for the last 7 years.

Back to the original post, I agree, where you don't need to shell out a lot of dough for a good-sounding kit. What many people have alluded to, a good drum sound is only partially dependent on the actual drum design/construction. A key element is mics and PA, which can vastly alter the sound of any drum kit.

I did make the mistake of buying a "boutique/exotic wood" snare drum back in 1991 as well. This snare drum sounds OK, but any standard wood-shelled drum sounds just as good, if not better, than my boutique snare drum, which wasn't worth the money I paid for it.

I think it's ridiculous that some new kits come out to about a grand a drum, which only amounts to a new drum out of a card board box, with no accessories, hardware, etc. It's even more ridiculous to buy "exotic-wood" drums of any kind, as they rarely live up to the hype and are not worth the money.

I've always considered myself a working drummer and the drums and cymbals that I have bought are meant to cover as many musical situations as possible. My Zildjians are 20-30 years old, yet they still sound great, and I make it a point to take care of my gear. Any specialized gear one buys will only be able to be used in a limited amount of musical situations. I try to think universal when buying any gear. This rule as served me well over the years.

Thank you for starting this post, and it has changed my perspective on my current kit and not worrying about buying another when when I don't need it. Plus, I've found the customer service with drum companies being very lacking. They seem to only cater to big name players who they'd gladly show their factory to and ink endorsement deals for whatever the drummer desires. As drummers, we have to live (and play) within our means. Don't spend needlessly, as you'll probably regret it. Try to find used cymbals that are in good shape, as they are a great bargain. Instead of buying a custom large kit, one may want to own a few smaller, complete kits that can be played in different situations.

BMM
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  #180  
Old 10-10-2017, 03:28 AM
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Bo Eder Bo Eder is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmm71 View Post
This was exactly the post I needed today, as I've been thinking about buying a new drum kit.

On a side note, I bought a great 5 piece Corders kit in 1991 that still sounds great today. I had wanted to add drums on to it, but the company that owns the currently drum shell design (Fibes) has been dormant for the past 10+ years, with the owner announcing the same broken-record statement of the company starting up in the near future for the last 7 years.

Back to the original post, I agree, where you don't need to shell out a lot of dough for a good-sounding kit. What many people have alluded to, a good drum sound is only partially dependent on the actual drum design/construction. A key element is mics and PA, which can vastly alter the sound of any drum kit.

I did make the mistake of buying a "boutique/exotic wood" snare drum back in 1991 as well. This snare drum sounds OK, but any standard wood-shelled drum sounds just as good, if not better, than my boutique snare drum, which wasn't worth the money I paid for it.

I think it's ridiculous that some new kits come out to about a grand a drum, which only amounts to a new drum out of a card board box, with no accessories, hardware, etc. It's even more ridiculous to buy "exotic-wood" drums of any kind, as they rarely live up to the hype and are not worth the money.

I've always considered myself a working drummer and the drums and cymbals that I have bought are meant to cover as many musical situations as possible. My Zildjians are 20-30 years old, yet they still sound great, and I make it a point to take care of my gear. Any specialized gear one buys will only be able to be used in a limited amount of musical situations. I try to think universal when buying any gear. This rule as served me well over the years.

Thank you for starting this post, and it has changed my perspective on my current kit and not worrying about buying another when when I don't need it. Plus, I've found the customer service with drum companies being very lacking. They seem to only cater to big name players who they'd gladly show their factory to and ink endorsement deals for whatever the drummer desires. As drummers, we have to live (and play) within our means. Don't spend needlessly, as you'll probably regret it. Try to find used cymbals that are in good shape, as they are a great bargain. Instead of buying a custom large kit, one may want to own a few smaller, complete kits that can be played in different situations.

BMM
You're welcome! I can't believe I wrote this SEVEN years ago! Wow. However, I must say that over the years I've eschewed "mid-level" gear and only use top-flight stuff, it's just not super-exotic. But it's completely reliable for everything.
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  #181  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:59 AM
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Erberderber Erberderber is offline
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Default Re: The expensive drum stigma....

Well this thread was started a good 4 years before I'd even discovered this site, so I thought I'd have a good trawl through it today.

My only input to it would be that a couple of weeks ago I was in a cosmetics shop and there was a tub of skin cream there that cost over 500 Euros. Surely this says it all. A 10 Euro tub of Nivea would surely fare just as well, but there are people out there that are willing to buy the super expensive stuff and this includes top of the range drum kits.

Now for those of you who get nagged by your wives or girlfriends about how much you spend on gear, you might want to check online how much that tub of gunk sitting on the ledge under the bathroom mirror set her back. You could be in for a shock ; )
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