DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 10-05-2017, 11:36 AM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Warning- this is a bit of venting, but I'm also looking for advice.

Im a uni student at the moment in my second year studying a degree unrelated to drums and music. I made a post about this here before. I love drumming more than anything else, and considered dropping out of uni to pursue it.

Nevertheless here I am at uni, and the main thing that gave me motivation to return was the prospect of joining
various bands, including the uni big band and concert band (something outside my comfort zone).

So I'm trying to arrange some jams with people who I have found at the uni. But I'm just not having any luck


I was excited I found this great RNB singer, really looked forward to meeting. Turns out he has a drummer already now.

I had the same thing last year, I was unable to arrange a single gig for my main band as we couldn't find a singer that would commit.

The jazz big band and concert band already have a drummer, who is more proficient at reading than me.

Even just trying to arrange one rehearsal with my main band is almost impossible, trying to get everyone to actually tell me when they can jam. I feel like I'm constantly nagging people.

Then again, if I did nothing, I'd have even less chance of playing.


I read stories of some of my fav bands. They met at uni, maybe even before when they were 17 or so. Or other drummers like thomas lang and benny greb who were successful early.

I just don't understand what am i doing wrong?!?!? I have such little experience playing gigs even though im ALWAYS up for them. I spent the whole of sixth form nagging my friends to rehearse and get gigs with no luck. And now the story repeats itself at uni.

It's so frustrating because I feel I'm actually being proactive with advertising for people etc but still having no luck. I seem to be a gig repellent my whole drumming life.

What can i do? I'm feeling very disillusioned with uni, and am questioning why Im here
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-05-2017, 11:55 AM
Mighty_Joker's Avatar
Mighty_Joker Mighty_Joker is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nottingham, England
Posts: 846
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Hi Buddy,

To give you a bi of context, I'm a 30 year old working drummer here in the UK, and I can tell you I've had the same feelings you're having now, and the same feelings of frustration.

To answer your main question "what am I doing wrong?", the answer is simple. You're spending too much time comparing yourself to others.

The people you are talking about, Benny Greb, Thomas Lang et al, are outliers in every sense of the word. Born to musical families, exposed to music extremely early, opportunities for high quality music lessons in musical parts of the world. They are not normal routes into the industry, and not representative of the vast majority of people in the industry.

Take Buddy Rich, or perhaps a guitar equivalent Guthrie Govan. They were taking lessons from aged 2 or something ridiculous, pushed on stage as a toddler, and never stopped. Is it any wonder they become big names in the industry?

Everybody has their own path. I'm 30 years old, married, with a mortgage, and I'm finding my way. I'm not a big name in the industry, but I nevertheless play the drums for a living. Am I frustrated that I can't play with Chick Corea at 25, or join Zappa at 22? Yes! Am I frustrated at the lack of musical artists that want a live or recording drummer for their original projects? Of course. But would I trade those things for my family, my house, and my overall quality of life? Hell no.

Drumming is what I do. It doesn't have to be my entire life. I keep striving for my goals and ambitions, but I also have learned some perspective.

Regarding ability, I was rubbish at 20. I now consider myself to be at a high professional level. The vast majority of my improvement came in the past six years or so. At 20, I couldn't play jazz or read. These days, I do both regularly on a pro basis. Give it time, keep working hard, and be patient.

Most importantly, stop comparing yourself to the few examples of people who encountered success extremely early.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-05-2017, 12:45 PM
williamsbclontz williamsbclontz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: East Texas area
Posts: 388
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

That's the one real problem with playing drums, it's super competitive. Most places you go there is a shortage of bass players, so there's no problem for them to find work, and most groups don't have an issue with using multiple guitarists, but drummers are constantly battling for gigs. Try making friends with some of the drummers around the area, almost half of my gigs I've ever gotten have been from being recommended by other drummers I'm friends with. Hope this helps!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:25 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mighty_Joker View Post
Hi Buddy,

To give you a bi of context, I'm a 30 year old working drummer here in the UK, and I can tell you I've had the same feelings you're having now, and the same feelings of frustration.

To answer your main question "what am I doing wrong?", the answer is simple. You're spending too much time comparing yourself to others.

The people you are talking about, Benny Greb, Thomas Lang et al, are outliers in every sense of the word. Born to musical families, exposed to music extremely early, opportunities for high quality music lessons in musical parts of the world. They are not normal routes into the industry, and not representative of the vast majority of people in the industry.

Take Buddy Rich, or perhaps a guitar equivalent Guthrie Govan. They were taking lessons from aged 2 or something ridiculous, pushed on stage as a toddler, and never stopped. Is it any wonder they become big names in the industry?

Everybody has their own path. I'm 30 years old, married, with a mortgage, and I'm finding my way. I'm not a big name in the industry, but I nevertheless play the drums for a living. Am I frustrated that I can't play with Chick Corea at 25, or join Zappa at 22? Yes! Am I frustrated at the lack of musical artists that want a live or recording drummer for their original projects? Of course. But would I trade those things for my family, my house, and my overall quality of life? Hell no.

Drumming is what I do. It doesn't have to be my entire life. I keep striving for my goals and ambitions, but I also have learned some perspective.

Regarding ability, I was rubbish at 20. I now consider myself to be at a high professional level. The vast majority of my improvement came in the past six years or so. At 20, I couldn't play jazz or read. These days, I do both regularly on a pro basis. Give it time, keep working hard, and be patient.

Most importantly, stop comparing yourself to the few examples of people who encountered success extremely early.
Thanks a lot. What did you do to improve so much after the age of 20? Did you just start focused and dedicated practice at that age?

Can I also ask if you studied drums/music at college or something? I'm hoping to make a career out of drumming, it's nice to hear people that are. Although I worry I'm at a disadvantage because of not studying drums at a prestigious college.

I suppose my issue is, HOW do I get into it? Where did it start for you, that has now led to you playing drums for a living? Where do I begin?

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:44 PM
MustangMick MustangMick is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Dundalk, Ireland
Posts: 141
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by williamsbclontz View Post
That's the one real problem with playing drums, it's super competitive. Most places you go there is a shortage of bass players, so there's no problem for them to find work, and most groups don't have an issue with using multiple guitarists, but drummers are constantly battling for gigs. Try making friends with some of the drummers around the area, almost half of my gigs I've ever gotten have been from being recommended by other drummers I'm friends with. Hope this helps!
One thing to remember is bands don't want a drummer that can play endless drum solos (like all the youtube drummers you see)

They want a drummer to play "Songs"........ The only people that get gigs from Drum solos are Drum clinicians or "youtube heroes".

Playing in time
Playing what's appropriate, especially accompanying a vocalist.
Work on your singing skills, for backing vocals (That's a huge benefit in getting gigs, one less person to hire)
Being easy to live/work with (No egos)

The right musicians will be seeking you out soon enough.

Good luck
Mick
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:52 PM
andtfoot's Avatar
andtfoot andtfoot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Canberra, Australia
Posts: 45
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by williamsbclontz View Post
Try making friends with some of the drummers around the area, almost half of my gigs I've ever gotten have been from being recommended by other drummers I'm friends with. Hope this helps!
This might also come in handy if the other drummers need a fill in for whatever reason. This is where being genuinely interested in the music they are playing comes in handy.

Are there any open jam sessions in the area? They are usually pretty good for meeting people and also gives an opportunity to demonstrate your ability (and I'm not talking about showing off, but rather being able to work with the others on stage).
Do you watch many local gigs? Obviously there are the musos there, but also venue owners, sound techs, etc might have a good idea of the scene and if anyone is looking for a drummer.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:24 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by andtfoot View Post
This might also come in handy if the other drummers need a fill in for whatever reason. This is where being genuinely interested in the music they are playing comes in handy.

Are there any open jam sessions in the area? They are usually pretty good for meeting people and also gives an opportunity to demonstrate your ability (and I'm not talking about showing off, but rather being able to work with the others on stage).
Do you watch many local gigs? Obviously there are the musos there, but also venue owners, sound techs, etc might have a good idea of the scene and if anyone is looking for a drummer.
No i don't go to any local gigs.

I just can't shake the feeling that I want to go and study jazz drums at Guildhall or something. Although I know I probably wouldn't be good enough, looking at the audition process...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:06 PM
MustangMick MustangMick is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Dundalk, Ireland
Posts: 141
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

[quote=Drumsarefun;1526410]No i don't go to any local gigs.

QUOTE]

How are you going to find musicians if you don't go where musicians are?
How are they going to meet you otherwise?

Facebook etc. is all well and good but up-close in person is the only true judge of anyone's personality (rather than their online profile)

Best of luck
Mick
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:25 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 1,841
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
No i don't go to any local gigs.
First, relax.

Second, if you want to know what the scene is like in your university town, you need to go see and be seen and hang out with the folks who play music. You can be the best drummer in the world, but if you aren't connecting with other musicians, nothing is going to happen. You need to

If you want to pursue music playing drums in a certain genre, you need to move to the place where that music thrives. I mean, I would love to play drums in a Celtic rock band. Is that going to happen living here in bluegrass country? Nope. Never. However, I am playing Americana music and having a blast (see my signature for the band I'm in now).

If you are into jazz, heck, I'd try to find just a piano player to play around with one afternoon. I'd find someone and just say, "Hey, I'm interested in playing a little jazz, and you're really good! Would you mind sitting down with me one afternoon and going over some tunes? I want to try it out."


I know what it's like to be chomping at the bit to play. I'm getting ready to turn 43, and I STILL feel like this.

Best of luck!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:43 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
First, relax.

Second, if you want to know what the scene is like in your university town, you need to go see and be seen and hang out with the folks who play music. You can be the best drummer in the world, but if you aren't connecting with other musicians, nothing is going to happen. You need to

If you want to pursue music playing drums in a certain genre, you need to move to the place where that music thrives. I mean, I would love to play drums in a Celtic rock band. Is that going to happen living here in bluegrass country? Nope. Never. However, I am playing Americana music and having a blast (see my signature for the band I'm in now).

If you are into jazz, heck, I'd try to find just a piano player to play around with one afternoon. I'd find someone and just say, "Hey, I'm interested in playing a little jazz, and you're really good! Would you mind sitting down with me one afternoon and going over some tunes? I want to try it out."


I know what it's like to be chomping at the bit to play. I'm getting ready to turn 43, and I STILL feel like this.

Best of luck!
Thank you. So if I just go to a local club where a band is playing that night, I should just go up to them after and try speak to them? Otherwise it's no different from just watching them and leaving.

Traditional jazz isn't really my preferred style of drumming/music. It's just weird to me that the only really "respected" courses with drumming i.e. not "modern music studies" seems to be jazz.

I think there'll always be part of me that wants to study drums at college instead, but as I say I've asked the question here before and the consensus seems to be that it's too risky or not a viable career option.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:53 PM
DrumWild DrumWild is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 387
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Don't worry about the college degree status when it comes to drumming in a band. Nobody will ever ask. St. Vincent left music school half-way through, realizing it had no relevance. Still, stay in school, for other reasons.

Your story sounds like mine, from 1983/84. I was at university, studying Percussion Arts.

I really wanted to get a band going. I couldn't play drums in the dorm, so I had my guitar. This one weird guy stops in, comments on how weird it looked [it was Dimebag Darrell style, before Dimebag had his style]. Asked to play it, strummed it a few times, and I did not see him for the rest of the year.

The few people in my building had some gear, but could not play. The rich kids in the building released some vinyl, but weren't doing anything else with it. They couldn't be bothered with playing.

The music majors were clinical, dry, not interested in having a band, and really not fun people overall. They were very serious at all times. In all fairness, I did not interact with everyone.

The first year was utterly depressing, and the second year was starting out to be more of the same. I wasn't old enough to go to bars, and wasn't really connected to anything outside of my Percussion Arts studies.

So on a Saturday night, I'm going to bed at 7:30pm, as one does in this mindset and situation. My little brother banged on my door, and said he wanted to go to a party. I had no idea where to start, so he showed me.

Walked down a street, went into a house, put a dollar in a hat, grabbed a red cup, and got a beer. Started talking to people. Went to a few more houses.

In one house, a band was playing called The Convertibles. I was blown away. Talked to them on a break, and got to know them.

We kept on with a few more houses. The guy I saw at the beginning of my first year saw me. "Hey, you're that guy with the weird guitar." We start talking. He's got a band, and they're looking for a bass player. I have nothing else to do, so I agreed.

This turned out to be my best live band, ever. I've been in LA for 31 years, and never made as much money or had crowds that big.

We played house parties, frat and sorority parties, and dorm parties. We played bars, with my mother attending so that I could be in the venue. We got to know other bands.

The Convertibles were the band that rented out their PA, as well as their 4-track. We opened for them for our first show, in a rotting basement in a house, with little puddles of water here and there on the floor.

Eventually they opened for us.

We got to know the guy who ran the local record store. In supporting his store, he supported all of us by releasing a local music compilation tape.

It was THE best year ever.

So, what advice would I give you based on this?

Get yourself out there. Even if it's a house party. Talk to people. Press the flesh. You might meet that person who has absolutely NOTHING to do with music, who has NO music abilities at all, but they might know someone who is trying to form a band.

Find those bands. We had flyers on the bulletin boards. I don't even know if those exist anymore. If a band is playing somewhere, then go there.

Be more upbeat. I understand being down. Quite frankly, I was rather suicidal my first year. Nobody wanted to be around that, and I understand why.

Be serious at the right time. Don't be so serious when looking for a band. They want someone fun. But when you're in the band, take that role seriously. Be prepared. Practice. All that. And then be the fun performer, both at rehearsal and shows.

Getting to know people and being present and visible in the scene is valuable. I've been in other solid bands since those days. What most of them have in common is that there was no audition. We just got together to see it if would work, no pressure.

Just for kicks, I'll include a photo from that first gig in that rancid basement. See any disappointment in that bass player? I understand where you're at now. I've been there. I also understand where you can be.

__________________
I don't really feel like I belong here, so please feel free to delete my account.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-05-2017, 04:28 PM
toddbishop toddbishop is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,913
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

DAF, you might consider transferring to another school-- someplace with a more active music department, or that's located in a city with a more active scene. Either way, you have to be persistent-- keep auditioning for school groups, keep seeking out new people. Go see some people play, and talk to them.

And you also can't be too concerned about "your style"-- your preferred style should be "music that uses drumset." Be willing to play anything.
__________________
Visit Cruise Ship Drummer! - a drumming blog | 2017 CSD! Book of the Blog now available
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-05-2017, 04:57 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumWild View Post
Don't worry about the college degree status when it comes to drumming in a band. Nobody will ever ask. St. Vincent left music school half-way through, realizing it had no relevance. Still, stay in school, for other reasons.

Your story sounds like mine, from 1983/84. I was at university, studying Percussion Arts.

I really wanted to get a band going. I couldn't play drums in the dorm, so I had my guitar. This one weird guy stops in, comments on how weird it looked [it was Dimebag Darrell style, before Dimebag had his style]. Asked to play it, strummed it a few times, and I did not see him for the rest of the year.

The few people in my building had some gear, but could not play. The rich kids in the building released some vinyl, but weren't doing anything else with it. They couldn't be bothered with playing.

The music majors were clinical, dry, not interested in having a band, and really not fun people overall. They were very serious at all times. In all fairness, I did not interact with everyone.

The first year was utterly depressing, and the second year was starting out to be more of the same. I wasn't old enough to go to bars, and wasn't really connected to anything outside of my Percussion Arts studies.

So on a Saturday night, I'm going to bed at 7:30pm, as one does in this mindset and situation. My little brother banged on my door, and said he wanted to go to a party. I had no idea where to start, so he showed me.

Walked down a street, went into a house, put a dollar in a hat, grabbed a red cup, and got a beer. Started talking to people. Went to a few more houses.

In one house, a band was playing called The Convertibles. I was blown away. Talked to them on a break, and got to know them.

We kept on with a few more houses. The guy I saw at the beginning of my first year saw me. "Hey, you're that guy with the weird guitar." We start talking. He's got a band, and they're looking for a bass player. I have nothing else to do, so I agreed.

This turned out to be my best live band, ever. I've been in LA for 31 years, and never made as much money or had crowds that big.

We played house parties, frat and sorority parties, and dorm parties. We played bars, with my mother attending so that I could be in the venue. We got to know other bands.

The Convertibles were the band that rented out their PA, as well as their 4-track. We opened for them for our first show, in a rotting basement in a house, with little puddles of water here and there on the floor.

Eventually they opened for us.

We got to know the guy who ran the local record store. In supporting his store, he supported all of us by releasing a local music compilation tape.

It was THE best year ever.

So, what advice would I give you based on this?

Get yourself out there. Even if it's a house party. Talk to people. Press the flesh. You might meet that person who has absolutely NOTHING to do with music, who has NO music abilities at all, but they might know someone who is trying to form a band.

Find those bands. We had flyers on the bulletin boards. I don't even know if those exist anymore. If a band is playing somewhere, then go there.

Be more upbeat. I understand being down. Quite frankly, I was rather suicidal my first year. Nobody wanted to be around that, and I understand why.

Be serious at the right time. Don't be so serious when looking for a band. They want someone fun. But when you're in the band, take that role seriously. Be prepared. Practice. All that. And then be the fun performer, both at rehearsal and shows.

Getting to know people and being present and visible in the scene is valuable. I've been in other solid bands since those days. What most of them have in common is that there was no audition. We just got together to see it if would work, no pressure.

Just for kicks, I'll include a photo from that first gig in that rancid basement. See any disappointment in that bass player? I understand where you're at now. I've been there. I also understand where you can be.

You see, some of those things you said. I'm just not sure those things happen anymore. I'm not sure if it's changing times or if it's just me that doesn't see all of these things happening.

For example, at house parties, people don't have live bands. People plug their phone into a speaker and put on Spotify playlist. Add to that I live in the UK and there's hardly a space for sofa in these student houses.

"We got to know the guy who ran the local record store"

Again, I'm not sure if it's changing times. But how did this happen? I'm not even sure we have local record stores anymore, due to the internet etc.


I get that those are just specific examples of your situation, and that it's not the only way things can happen. There are a few clubs here at Bath (UK) but it's quite a small city so not too much. I really hope to start rehearsing with my band if we can get a good singer and play a few of these clubs.


I know I shouldn't, but I can't help but feel disappointed that "band music" is just not nearly as popular nowadays, particularly among people my age.

These cool stories, like how you played in an old rotting house, that's so cool! I know it's an unhealthy mindset, but I feel like these "cool" or exciting things just aren't something that happen to me. I suppose a lot has to do with my personality though
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:01 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by toddbishop View Post
DAF, you might consider transferring to another school-- someplace with a more active music department, or that's located in a city with a more active scene. Either way, you have to be persistent-- keep auditioning for school groups, keep seeking out new people. Go see some people play, and talk to them.

And you also can't be too concerned about "your style"-- your preferred style should be "music that uses drumset." Be willing to play anything.
I would be happy to play any style if it meant I could study drums. Unfortunately I can't justify leaving my degree to study jazz drums, as much as I LOVE the idea.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:21 PM
DrumWild DrumWild is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 387
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Yea, the record store part, I understand.

The party/Spotify scenario makes sense, too. In my time, it was a band, or it was records or tapes.

I do see what you're talking about. A few years ago, I had gone to a venue on the Sunset Strip in California. It's a place where many big bands got their start, and also were I had played through the late 80s, until the late 2000s. It was an effort to stay up-to-date on what was happening. I was ready to rock.

The "band" that took the stage was four kids with laptops and controllers. At least one of them was a piano-type keyboard controller. There were no dynamics, no emotion, and nothing outstanding about it. No drum set, either. Not even an e-kit, and no finger drumming. On a side note, I have mad respect for finger drummers, and have been working on building that ability myself.

What made it worse was looking around. Nobody was looking at them. Everybody was on their phones, ignoring them, and maybe looking for something better to do. Probably seeking out something better to ignore. I suspect they spend their lives looking for something better while missing what is going on right now.

That day, I was disappointed in both musicians and the audience.

It might very well be more difficult to find players of "real instruments." The good news is that I've seen them out there.

I'm a fan of this kid, Christone Kingfish Ingram, born in 1999. I noticed that he's playing with older players, probably because it's hard to find musicians his own age at his level of expertise.

In a way, I suppose a band is like a missing sock. Looking for it brings about nothing, and you stumble upon it when you least expect it.

Keep on drumming, FOR YOU, because you love it and because it makes you happy. I think that if you do that, then your missing sock will reveal itself.
__________________
I don't really feel like I belong here, so please feel free to delete my account.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:44 PM
MustangMick MustangMick is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Dundalk, Ireland
Posts: 141
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Bath,
first time I saw Thomas Lang (2000 I think?) was at a Drum clinic at Bath Spa University. Lovely city.

Mick
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:45 PM
eclipseownzu's Avatar
eclipseownzu eclipseownzu is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: New London, CT
Posts: 1,391
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

You have to be a likeable guy that people want to play with. I have always been able to find gigs because I get along with people. I have gotten gigs with people who have never heard me play. I put myself in social situations with other musicians and good things tend to happen. I go to local shows where other musicians are and just talk to people. I don't get drunk, I don't talk smack about people, I just try to get along. I have played in a piano bar, I played with a DJ a couple of times, even played with a country rap band (dont ask), I have played covers and originals with more bands than I can count. I have even turned down multiple touring opportunities, all because when people think of a drummer in the area, they think of me. I'm not great, I'm barely even good, but I enjoy meeting new people and making new friends so I get gigs. You will never make friends in your dorm room, or practicing for 12 hours a day, you have to get out and be sociable. Meet other musicians and GO WHERE OTHER PEOPLE ARE MAKING MUSIC.

My other advice is to pick up the guitar. Make your own music then find people to play it with you. Then you are in a position of power. As a drummer we are reliant upon other musicians to be leaders and songwriters, which can admittedly be difficult. Take charge of your musical direction and own your future. You will be much happier not relying other people.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-05-2017, 06:46 PM
DrumWild DrumWild is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 387
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
My other advice is to pick up the guitar. Make your own music then find people to play it with you. Then you are in a position of power. As a drummer we are reliant upon other musicians to be leaders and songwriters, which can admittedly be difficult. Take charge of your musical direction and own your future. You will be much happier not relying other people.
Great point!

That was one of my motivations before college; to have some independence. Then, as a Percussion Arts major, piano, string bass, marimba, and music theory were part of the program.

To OP: Even if you don't get very proficient, picking up another instrument will help you avoid that "group project" scenario that can be a band situation. It will also make you a better drummer, as having a better understanding of other instruments helps a drummer figure out how to make the other instruments sound better.
__________________
I don't really feel like I belong here, so please feel free to delete my account.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-05-2017, 07:05 PM
Ohio's Avatar
Ohio Ohio is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 41
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Get yourself an XBOX ONE and the game Rock Band and give everyone else the finger..
Attached Images
 
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-05-2017, 07:18 PM
Woolwich Woolwich is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 519
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumWild View Post
Yea, the record store part, I understand.

The party/Spotify scenario makes sense, too. In my time, it was a band, or it was records or tapes.

I do see what you're talking about. A few years ago, I had gone to a venue on the Sunset Strip in California. It's a place where many big bands got their start, and also were I had played through the late 80s, until the late 2000s. It was an effort to stay up-to-date on what was happening. I was ready to rock.

The "band" that took the stage was four kids with laptops and controllers. At least one of them was a piano-type keyboard controller. There were no dynamics, no emotion, and nothing outstanding about it. No drum set, either. Not even an e-kit, and no finger drumming. On a side note, I have mad respect for finger drummers, and have been working on building that ability myself.

What made it worse was looking around. Nobody was looking at them. Everybody was on their phones, ignoring them, and maybe looking for something better to do. Probably seeking out something better to ignore. I suspect they spend their lives looking for something better while missing what is going on right now.

That day, I was disappointed in both musicians and the audience.

It might very well be more difficult to find players of "real instruments." The good news is that I've seen them out there.

I'm a fan of this kid, Christone Kingfish Ingram, born in 1999. I noticed that he's playing with older players, probably because it's hard to find musicians his own age at his level of expertise.

In a way, I suppose a band is like a missing sock. Looking for it brings about nothing, and you stumble upon it when you least expect it.

Keep on drumming, FOR YOU, because you love it and because it makes you happy. I think that if you do that, then your missing sock will reveal itself.
Oh no, the phone thing. We did a gig the other week and because some of the people there were family members who had made the effort to come I was keen to make eye contact. Two of them (in their 30s, not kids) spent most of the first set staring at their own and each others phones, no doubt doing what you said and looking for something better....before the next morning posting about what a great gig they were at despite missing a third of it. It got me looking around the room though and they weren't alone. It was annoying but fortunately as the night progressed and the drinks flowed people started actually watching the gig! The very thought!!

Back to the OPs issue, see if there are any music or social forums aimed at the Bath area and see if there's a musicians wanted section there. I'm in 2 bands and both of them came about as a result of answering a musicians wanted ad online.
And while this may sound overly harsh, your tone and mood in all of your posts are very "down", if this is how you present yourself in the "real world" too then you need to shake yourself out of the dumps and lighten up. Sorry to criticise but that's how I read your posts.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-05-2017, 10:08 PM
Mighty_Joker's Avatar
Mighty_Joker Mighty_Joker is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nottingham, England
Posts: 846
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
Thanks a lot. What did you do to improve so much after the age of 20? Did you just start focused and dedicated practice at that age?

Can I also ask if you studied drums/music at college or something? I'm hoping to make a career out of drumming, it's nice to hear people that are. Although I worry I'm at a disadvantage because of not studying drums at a prestigious college.

I suppose my issue is, HOW do I get into it? Where did it start for you, that has now led to you playing drums for a living? Where do I begin?

Cheers
Yes, I practised a hell of a lot. At one point I was racking up 20-30 hours per week, while teaching and working on a Masters Degree. To follow up, no, I have never studied music at college, school, or university. My music education has always been private lessons, self study, and experience. I don't believe I have been at a disadvantage because of this. Forget the idea of a prestigious college. As others have said, focus on bettering yourself and meeting people.

As for how to get in, the best advice I can give you other than what's already been said is firstly, be ready to take advantage of any opportunities that come, but secondly, create your own. When I was frustrated about finding musicians playing music I wanted to play, I wrote my own album, and then I became the one hiring the musicians. I became the one people wanted to play with because I was the one with the big project, and yes, I paid properly.


Persistence is key. It's unlikely to happen quickly. Build up over time, keep bettering yourself, and don't give up too soon (ever!).
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-05-2017, 11:25 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mighty_Joker View Post
Yes, I practised a hell of a lot. At one point I was racking up 20-30 hours per week, while teaching and working on a Masters Degree. To follow up, no, I have never studied music at college, school, or university. My music education has always been private lessons, self study, and experience. I don't believe I have been at a disadvantage because of this. Forget the idea of a prestigious college. As others have said, focus on bettering yourself and meeting people.

As for how to get in, the best advice I can give you other than what's already been said is firstly, be ready to take advantage of any opportunities that come, but secondly, create your own. When I was frustrated about finding musicians playing music I wanted to play, I wrote my own album, and then I became the one hiring the musicians. I became the one people wanted to play with because I was the one with the big project, and yes, I paid properly.


Persistence is key. It's unlikely to happen quickly. Build up over time, keep bettering yourself, and don't give up too soon (ever!).
Thanks man, it's great to hear you can do it without music college.

I don't know anything about music theory, but I like the idea of getting into it.

I can't decide though if keyboard or guitar is better for writing my own songs with + learning music theory.

Guitar is classic but I guess keyboard can create so many different sounds if hooked up to a computer
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-05-2017, 11:37 PM
opentune's Avatar
opentune opentune is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,819
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
Im a uni student at the moment in my second year studying a degree unrelated to drums and music.
So I'm trying to arrange some jams with people who I have found at the uni. But I'm just not having any luck
What can i do? I'm feeling very disillusioned with uni, and am questioning why Im here
As I interpret your post, you are not at uni to learn drums/music. I get that, but keep in mind others there are doing degrees unrelated to music. This may mean they cannot get too deep into it because they are busy 'studying something else'.
You might want to try sampling another population in your town or city. Other young budding musicians who are NOT busy in uni classes.
You seem to be 'questioning uni', but i'd say its not the best place to 'form a band' when everybody may be busy studying something else. I gather you did not go there to form a band, but to get a degree, right?
Try getting people together who are NOT in uni. They may have way more time or interest.
__________________
Louis
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-06-2017, 06:14 AM
williamsbclontz williamsbclontz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: East Texas area
Posts: 388
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
My other advice is to pick up the guitar. Make your own music then find people to play it with you. Then you are in a position of power. As a drummer we are reliant upon other musicians to be leaders and songwriters, which can admittedly be difficult. Take charge of your musical direction and own your future. You will be much happier not relying other people.
This is what I'm currently doing and I'm happier than I've ever been. I'm not playing a different instrument but I'm writing basslines and guitar parts and I'm using my own guys who I'm close friends with. My music and my direction, and it's the best!
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-06-2017, 10:20 AM
Woolwich Woolwich is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 519
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Have you tried Facebook?
I've just typed in "Bath Musici" and four groups, 'Bath Music Scene', 'Bath Gigs, Bands And Musicians' 'Music Bath' and 'Bath Music Collective' have shown up. Have a dig into these, broaden the search by using Somerset in the search bar instead of Bath. There may be people looking for musicians on these pages or information about gigs you can go to where you could perhaps meet people etc.

As Opentune says, perhaps by looking within the University you're limiting your options. I could be totally wrong but the impression I get from my son who is also starting his second year (and who coincidentally has a mate in Bath University) is that the music societys are more geared towards the classical side than the contemporary, at least they are at his Uni. Also between his studies which take him in every day of the week and Basketball which takes up two nights and the traditional Wednesday afternoon he is struggling to fit a part time job in. If he was musically inclined at all he would literally have to choose between that and his sport or job. There must surely be plenty of people in Bath with less stretching timetables in college or in full time employment who have more time in the evenings to enjoy their music.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-06-2017, 10:38 AM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by williamsbclontz View Post
This is what I'm currently doing and I'm happier than I've ever been. I'm not playing a different instrument but I'm writing basslines and guitar parts and I'm using my own guys who I'm close friends with. My music and my direction, and it's the best!
So would you recommend guitar over keyboard?

I really can't decide, I feel like keyboard is easier for learning and understanding music theory.

Also I could create whole songs using a keyboard + a DAW on my computer


But then guitar would also be awesome.

Can't afford both sadly.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-06-2017, 10:39 AM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woolwich View Post
Have you tried Facebook?
I've just typed in "Bath Musici" and four groups, 'Bath Music Scene', 'Bath Gigs, Bands And Musicians' 'Music Bath' and 'Bath Music Collective' have shown up. Have a dig into these, broaden the search by using Somerset in the search bar instead of Bath. There may be people looking for musicians on these pages or information about gigs you can go to where you could perhaps meet people etc.

As Opentune says, perhaps by looking within the University you're limiting your options. I could be totally wrong but the impression I get from my son who is also starting his second year (and who coincidentally has a mate in Bath University) is that the music societys are more geared towards the classical side than the contemporary, at least they are at his Uni. Also between his studies which take him in every day of the week and Basketball which takes up two nights and the traditional Wednesday afternoon he is struggling to fit a part time job in. If he was musically inclined at all he would literally have to choose between that and his sport or job. There must surely be plenty of people in Bath with less stretching timetables in college or in full time employment who have more time in the evenings to enjoy their music.
That's a great idea, I'm using the FB Uni music page, will have a look at stuff outside uni aswell

Really appreciate it
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-06-2017, 02:15 PM
Purple Cobwebs's Avatar
Purple Cobwebs Purple Cobwebs is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 68
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
You see, some of those things you said. I'm just not sure those things happen anymore. I'm not sure if it's changing times or if it's just me that doesn't see all of these things happening.

For example, at house parties, people don't have live bands. People plug their phone into a speaker and put on Spotify playlist. Add to that I live in the UK and there's hardly a space for sofa in these student houses.

"We got to know the guy who ran the local record store"

Again, I'm not sure if it's changing times. But how did this happen? I'm not even sure we have local record stores anymore, due to the internet etc.


I get that those are just specific examples of your situation, and that it's not the only way things can happen. There are a few clubs here at Bath (UK) but it's quite a small city so not too much. I really hope to start rehearsing with my band if we can get a good singer and play a few of these clubs.


I know I shouldn't, but I can't help but feel disappointed that "band music" is just not nearly as popular nowadays, particularly among people my age.

These cool stories, like how you played in an old rotting house, that's so cool! I know it's an unhealthy mindset, but I feel like these "cool" or exciting things just aren't something that happen to me. I suppose a lot has to do with my personality though
Although some of those things have changed, there's a lot that is still relevant.

I'm in the UK and there are still plenty of bars hosting local bands. Choose one and become a regular. After the gig, comment on the drummers kit, or on a song you enjoyed. Just get talking to the bands. The next time you go along, just make eye contact and say Hi. Eventually you'll be recognised and remembered.
I've done this, and already been asked if I'd like to stand in on a song with a band next time they play local to me. It terrifies me, but it could be a really good experience for me.

Even offering to help carry things to cars/vans at the end of the night could help start conversations where you can mention that you are a drummer and looking to start something up. Most band members have wide circles of musician friends and acquaintances and one conversation can lead to a meeting that gets you on your way.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-06-2017, 03:21 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 19,658
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

You could lament about your situation...or you could take charge and if there is a lack of live music near you...you could change that. You could organize events. It's a surefire way to get you into your local scene. You have all kinds of latent powers. If you see a deficiency, correct it. Simple in concept, but it will take some work.

There are no shortage of musicians. What there is, is a shortage of people who
will try and organize something.

You need to secure a venue that is up for live music, arrange for bands to play, and from there, that's all the in you should need. Yes that's an oversimplification, but it could be a winning formula for your situation.
__________________
Sucking all the fun right out of life...
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-06-2017, 05:12 PM
Purple Cobwebs's Avatar
Purple Cobwebs Purple Cobwebs is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 68
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
You could lament about your situation...or you could take charge and if there is a lack of live music near you...you could change that. You could organize events. It's a surefire way to get you into your local scene. You have all kinds of latent powers. If you see a deficiency, correct it. Simple in concept, but it will take some work.

There are no shortage of musicians. What there is, is a shortage of people who
will try and organize something.

You need to secure a venue that is up for live music, arrange for bands to play, and from there, that's all the in you should need. Yes that's an oversimplification, but it could be a winning formula for your situation.
Spot on! I did this in the village I live in, and as well as getting to know lots of musicians, was able to use the opportunity to play my first live gig! (Only a 30 minute opening slot, but great experience and a start!) I've already got bands interested in doing another event next year.

It has also led to other music events being held at a venue that is not usually known for music, so a win win situation!
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-06-2017, 06:06 PM
Juniper's Avatar
Juniper Juniper is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Near London, UK
Posts: 960
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Your biggest problem is that you're looking too much at the negatives and thinking of failure already.

Bath does have some live music on regularly and although there are no major venues in the area there are still smaller places to go and mingle in that scene to hopfully make contacts.

Also, Bristol is 15minutes away on the train from Bath. Maybe go and check out some music/chat to some musicians there? If you feel Bath is so poor for a music scene what about another (larger) place just on your doorstep?

At the end of the day what have you got to loose?
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-06-2017, 07:46 PM
Steady Freddy's Avatar
Steady Freddy Steady Freddy is offline
Pioneer Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the pocket.
Posts: 1,699
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

I'd go to every music store in your area and see if you can post a flyer or card.

Drummer available, musicians wanted, jam sessions..........
__________________
Amateurs practice until they get it right. Professionals practice until they can't get it wrong.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-06-2017, 09:42 PM
Steady Freddy's Avatar
Steady Freddy Steady Freddy is offline
Pioneer Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the pocket.
Posts: 1,699
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumWild View Post
I do see what you're talking about. A few years ago, I had gone to a venue on the Sunset Strip in California. It's a place where many big bands got their start, and also were I had played through the late 80s, until the late 2000s. It was an effort to stay up-to-date on what was happening.
The Wiskey!! Starwood was a great venue too!!
__________________
Amateurs practice until they get it right. Professionals practice until they can't get it wrong.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10-06-2017, 10:30 PM
w3r1_drums's Avatar
w3r1_drums w3r1_drums is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 216
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

I definitely feel you there

My band We Are One has made a few connections via a local venue with an open mic and through them we've gotten to play a few shows, and they know us well enough there that I think they'd be willing to use us for the festivals that they put on (they run a couple of festivals in that area). just look around for wherever you can play.

ofc, all that's not helpful if you can't start a band. Grabbing a group of musicians is hard. Gotta look around everywhere. I was lucky enough to be able to grab two bands together from the people I knew. I can't help you there.
__________________
My bands: We Are One, Twelve Foot Shadow, Natural Disaster
I play Zildjian & Vic Firth
My Music
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10-07-2017, 01:37 AM
Groov-E Groov-E is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 730
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Don't forget to study while you are there, 99 chances out of a hundred your future income depends on it.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 10-07-2017, 07:31 AM
williamsbclontz williamsbclontz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: East Texas area
Posts: 388
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
So would you recommend guitar over keyboard?

I really can't decide, I feel like keyboard is easier for learning and understanding music theory.

Also I could create whole songs using a keyboard + a DAW on my computer


But then guitar would also be awesome.

Can't afford both sadly.
Im based out of the Louisiana Texas area so I play a lot of blues/country/soul type stuff so guitar is always present. We sometimes use an organ but I usually trust whatever they throw into the mix.

If you were to learn anything definitely learn bass, because its the second half of the groove after the drum track. So for my band I write the bassline and drum parts, then I'll usually get a few really good local guitar players to help me with writing guitar parts.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 10-07-2017, 09:06 AM
Magenta's Avatar
Magenta Magenta is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Gwlad Cymru
Posts: 3,182
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

I do feel for you.

This thread has loads of replies and I haven't read all of them so I apologise if I'm repeating anything that has already been suggested, but here goes anyway:

joinmyband.co.uk is a jolly useful site. It's a bit like Tinder.

Are there any open mics near you? I realise this may involve going to the pub at least once a week, but hey, you're a student, I'm sure you can handle it!

And let me ask around a few people. I'm not sure if I know anybody in the Bath area, but I may well know people who do.
__________________
Thinly veiled angel

Ladies & gentlemen, I've suffered for my art. Now it's your turn (Neil Innes)
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 10-07-2017, 01:37 PM
Magenta's Avatar
Magenta Magenta is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Gwlad Cymru
Posts: 3,182
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
And let me ask around a few people. I'm not sure if I know anybody in the Bath area, but I may well know people who do.
I've had a couple of suggestions, and I've contacted them. If you PM me your details I'll pass them on if any of them get back to you.
__________________
Thinly veiled angel

Ladies & gentlemen, I've suffered for my art. Now it's your turn (Neil Innes)
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 10-07-2017, 05:28 PM
Groov-E Groov-E is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 730
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Instead of being a boring geezer and tell you to study hard and get good grades, I'll indulge in the original topic and tell you about my current situation.

I am having a hard time finding local jazz musicians in my hometown. Everyone wants a metal drummer, but I can't do it anymore. Fed up with the genre and the people I am.

So I am about to contact a stand up bass player to get lessons - only instead I'll pay him 20$ an hour to jam with him.

A good way to expose myself to a mostly closed and elitist clique I figure.

We'll see from there.

Focus on solutions, we just need to stay positive and creative in our musical journey.

And Magenta's offer is very nice, you have nice drumming community over there.

Have a great weekend.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 10-08-2017, 02:41 PM
Drumsarefun's Avatar
Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 82
Default Re: Constant frustration/disappointment with music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
I do feel for you.

This thread has loads of replies and I haven't read all of them so I apologise if I'm repeating anything that has already been suggested, but here goes anyway:

joinmyband.co.uk is a jolly useful site. It's a bit like Tinder.

Are there any open mics near you? I realise this may involve going to the pub at least once a week, but hey, you're a student, I'm sure you can handle it!

And let me ask around a few people. I'm not sure if I know anybody in the Bath area, but I may well know people who do.
Hey, thanks a lot. My uni has set up a weekly open mic night now, but it seems it is acoustic, something that happens quite often. I imagine due to small venues, with full bands not having enough space or being too loud.

As for other suggestions. I've got 3 jams with various people this week, hoping to go to a local gig on wednesday night for 3, hopefully can speak to the band after. Will just have to see.

Bit more hopeful now, thanks everyone for helping me realise there's more I can be doing
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com