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  #41  
Old 09-27-2017, 11:27 AM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: How should I choose a drum teacher as a beginner?

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Originally Posted by aaronmcd View Post
Did I enjoy it? Hmm, I felt quite awkward trying to figure out what was going on, but I feel like I COULD have enjoyed it if I had a couple drinks first lol! Not sure what I wanted out of it, but I think I may get something out of it if I stick with this guy. Mostly Im just confused. But its cheap enough to give him a few weeks before writing him off. I think it could be fun, and he didn't tell me to do patterns which threw me off! But if I think about it he is right... It should be about making sounds, and learning how to make sounds comes first. Anyway, I can learn patterns all day at my desk at work with or without a teacher... Lol.
Its your call and your time and money. People can only give advice based on there own experiences. You are coming at drumming from a completely different angle to the one that drove me.
It would be interesting, to me at least, to be kept up to date with how you get on with drumming and learning the way you are approaching it. Most people have a fixed idea of what they want from lessons, so you may have to cut any teacher some slack if you are both sounding each other out.
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  #42  
Old 09-27-2017, 02:15 PM
beyondbetrayal beyondbetrayal is offline
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Default Re: How should I choose a drum teacher as a beginner?

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Originally Posted by aaronmcd View Post
Wow. First guy on the list was sooo confusing. Totally different. So far out of my comfort zone mostly cuz its not what I expect. Half hour of practice pad, kinda slow, very relaxed. Talking the whole time. Next half hour on the kit just banging around. That's the weird part. He wants me to get used to playing loud and was having me just hit random drums in 16ths continuously keeping volume up. Its hard to tell what he wants me to do though cuz he doesnt tell me. He starts doimg it and I think I am supposed to follow, but its random. So I stop. Confused. He says dont hit than 4 times each just hit them when I feel like it. Like learning letters before words. So it makes sense but it didnt make sense til we were done, so I just felt very awkward the whole time. I feel like a little kid would love it but my brain is trying to find a pattern haha. No books. I think I might maybe go back because its so weird that it might be good for me.

A teacher starting out on the pad like that gets my interest. If you can't play it on the pad, you can't play it on drums. I spend so much time on my pad at home and he's teaching good habits. He may not do that every lesson, but even a few minutes is great for warming up.

The 16th notes keeping volume up not repeating IS HARD. That is good. It is teaching you how to be creative and not fall into the old around the world fill and habits. Once you start adding accents into things like , and then rest, and then changing subdivisions, that you can get some very good sounds.

You could alternate both for a bit, practice what they both give you and make your choice.. Sounds like they have 2 totally different styles and you could benefit from both. One of them WILL stick out in time.


I hate to say it as there are some amazing super young drummers, but I find not age (although often related) but experience is huge. Guys who have played for a long time just have mountains of skills and information to teach, where as younger guys will teach "beats, grooves, and fills"
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  #43  
Old 09-29-2017, 04:57 AM
aaronmcd aaronmcd is offline
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Default Re: How should I choose a drum teacher as a beginner?

I went to the third teacher tonight. He was 40ish, very friendly, could just chat with him but at a dollar a minute I don't wanna chat TOO much. He has taught full time/part time over the years and played in a few bands. Just tonight he is playing at The Chapel in the Mission district where he lives. I would go, but am flying out to Maui tomorrow so I should probably pack.

We started out on snare, similar to the practice pad of the other teachers and my own routine. I got some of the same technique instruction on doubles. We focused on doubles for a while. His drill is 4 sets of 16th doubles + 16th rest followed by a couple 8ths to round out the measure, and switch hands. Also he didn't want to overwhelm me but he mentioned working triples in the same pattern, which makes me understand why he does it this way vs 1/8 rest. The only thing I didnt like is that he doesn't like putting things in context of the actual rhythm analytically. I learn better once I know what I'm aiming for. But maybe he just isn't aware that I understand time and actually can figure stuff out better that way. I feel like a few lessons with him to get to know each other better and things will go smoother.

He pulled out a page of drills and I immediately recognized it as a page from "A Funky Primer" that I have been working through on recommendation from the first teacher I met with (I'm loving the book, btw - it combines working coordination and independence with reading music. I like to work the bass independence drills continuously down the page for practice reading). The pages he printed out were snare patterns from section 2 just with a kick each beat keeping time. The book says to alternate hands but he said to alternate hands per 16th - e.g. skip a left if the right plays an eighth and go back to right left right for the following group. Etc. He spent too much time explaining this and writing it out since I got what he was saying right away. But again, he gets a pass there cuz first lesson and who knows, I could have been someone who doesn't understand time.

We had a bit of time left so I showed him the basic beats I was practicing on the set - just a basic rock beat with kick on various 8ths. He suggested working on hi hat, which makes sense to me. It makes the sound much more interesting and also works in my left foot.

In the end, we somehow got a lot accomplished despite what I felt was spending too much time on basic music notation that I already knew. I compare him more to the first guy I met, but with more of a plan. However, the first guy seemed more able to undeestand where I'm coming from. He differed from teacher number one in how to position the wrists though. Teacher one wanted wrists and hands fully aligned with forearms, which puts the butts of the sticks a little wider. I liked that as I am playing German grip and the butts of the sticks better avoid my palms that way. The guy today suggested bringing it in a bit so I have a slight lateral bend in the wrists, and aligning the sticks with my arms more than aligning the hands with my arms. Seems like picky details but I would like to know if one way or the other could hurt in the long run.

Anyway, fun times, can't decide, wanna play on a real kit more, wanna get good etc. :)

Also I stopped at guitar center and picked up some ATH-M40x headphones. That's what they recommended and seemed like a good choice. Hope they provide enough noise isolation that I don't go deaf. Got a few sticks also so I'm not practicing with chipped sticks all the time. Still gotta go back and scope out all the e kit options. Looked like they had some fancy ones, I could hardly tell they were electronic, even the cymbals looked almost real (except for the color lol).
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  #44  
Old 09-29-2017, 02:50 PM
Odd-Arne Oseberg's Avatar
Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
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Default Re: How should I choose a drum teacher as a beginner?

Getting to know a student takes time.

What we do is take notes and work within the experience we have with forme students.

It's critical to expose and start working on holes in basic knowledge and technique to move on. Intuition only goes so far and we sometimes have to be flexible in regards to a students interests and way of understanding in how and the order we do things.

As with any basic training, once the fundamentals are there the teachers role changes to be more of a guide on a path rather than a traditional teacher. The goal of the basic training is to prepare the student for that other type of student tacher relationship.

Technique is personal to an extent. The way I do it we start with the basics that everyne has to understand and do and when we move on I explain different things and why one would choose one over the other. The explaining why rather than just telling students to do certain things pretty much removes any barrier I've ever meet. I can relate to things they already know and aree intrested in as well as setting my status as a teacher in proving that I both understand and care about them and also know my stuff.

Good easy to understand methodology, if you choose the right one, is 90% of the job, though.
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So, kick drum...or...bass drum? I'll tell you what. If it's 18" or less, it's a FOOT TOM.
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  #45  
Old 10-07-2017, 07:22 AM
aaronmcd aaronmcd is offline
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Default Re: How should I choose a drum teacher as a beginner?

Went back to that last teacher today. Probably gonna stick with him for a while. He is a bit overly friendly but that's ok I guess. He seems super excited that I'm actually practicing and figuring stuff out. Maybe he is just trying to be nice but he seems pretty genuine. Anyway we went over stuff from last week. We went over a section of the funky primer that he gave me and went straight through line by line. Talked a bit more on technique, bands, time signatures - I already know time signatures but we listened to Money by Pink Floyd for the 7/4 bass line. Focusing now on various accent locations in singles and paradiddles, singles/doubles drills, and single double and triple paradiddles. We stayed on the snare tonight and even went a tad overtime but he let me bang on the kit while he packed up. And talked about cymbals, dynamics, random stuff.

Also, on Wednesday I rented a room at the local studio for an hour. It was really fun practicing on a real kit on my own with no teacher around. Worked lots of grooves from funky primer and practiced putting in different hi hat sounds on various beats. Then just played around for the last 10 minutes. I think that's important for me personally to work on - just playing around. One of these weeks I have to get some music on and just jam along and feel it out. Or get some sheet music even.

Leaving for a 2 week trip to Thailand in 3 weeks. I'm hoping I don't lose too much of the progress I'm making. I can probably stuff sticks in my luggage and drum on my legs. That's what I did for our Maui trip last weekend.
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