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  #1  
Old 08-30-2017, 02:26 PM
Mungril Mungril is offline
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Default Which Hand Drum?

So whenever I'm listening to my music I always find myself tapping my desk to try to mimic the beat, although it is nothing serious its something that gets me in the mood of the music and Is quite fun. So I want to take a more serious approach to this activity and learn a hand drum to achieve the same concept of making beats to any song I listen to. Basically a hand drum that is very versatile in making beats. I have been doing some research but I am still not sure which hand drum I should be looking to buy. I'm seeking some advice/knowledge in relation to me buying a hand drum with the stated criteria, any help is much appreciated. Thanks guys.
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2017, 02:29 PM
Gottliver Gottliver is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

I like the Bongos. Small and easy to transport. Very versatile. Some good brands are Meinl, LP and Gon Bops.
Check out this series of videos by Pete Lockett. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aqWgvI-XWUU
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  #3  
Old 08-30-2017, 04:29 PM
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PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

A lot of people on here will recommend a cajon. However, I've always enjoyed playing a djembe. If you go this route, look for a used Remo djembe that can be tuned with a drum key as opposed to ropes.

In other words, get this:




Not this:




I'll probably get raked by suggesting this, but I don't care. I simply don't have time to learn another skill set. I can tune with a drum key all day.
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  #4  
Old 08-30-2017, 04:48 PM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

I have a doumbek, a jingle darbuka, a couple of cajons (a cheap dual-tapa one and a Toca Bourdeaux with adjustable snare) and a pair of cheap bongos.

Basically, most hand percussions have one "low" sound when hit near the center and one "high" sound when played near the edge. But the truth is that, depending on your technique, you can obtain many different sounds by slapping, playing with fingers, sliding your hand across the surface, etc. I'm far from a skilled player but they're all real fun to play.

For versatility, I'd probably take my cheap DrumBox (that's the brand's name) double-tapa cajon. It has a grainy, non-polished finish so it can be played with the hands or with brushes. One tapa has snares, the opposite tapa doesn't, so I have two sets of sounds to play with. Plus it's easy to incorporate accessories if you have space. I have a shoe shaker, a tambourine and a Wuhan splash that work pretty well with the cajon.

The Toca cajon is considerably (like 4 times) more expensive. I played it at the store and loved the sounds and the looks. But it has a polished surface that is no good for brushes, so it's more of a "show-off" instrument, while the DrumBox is the player.

I also like my Meinl jingle darbuka. It has a very metallic sound (it's made of aluminum) but the built-in jingle does add some versatility. It requires lots of practice and technique so I can only play simple rhythms and not too fast. The doumbek is similar sans the jingles, only a bit larger and with a round edge, which is actually much easier on the hands (a bad stroke on the darbuka can hurt quite a bit); it's also more expensive (like 3x) and nice to look at, but once again, I consider the darbuka to be the player and the doumbek for the looks. In any case, either one is great to make beats or add something new to songs.

The bongos, I don't play them too much, really. They are hand-made, very artesanal (the heads are made from real skins, with hair and all), but don't sound so good to me, and I have never been able to tune them to my liking.

I've been meaning to buy another pair of bongos (as you can see, I'm a "two of each" kind of guy) from a big brand, but I'm actually more interested in getting a Remo djembe first, all because of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdfN5FWH1-E

I love that video because it doesn't sound like a djembe at all (african-style djembe playing is completely different). Like I said, whatever instrument you choose, you can make it sound many different ways.

So, my suggestion is, go visit a store and try different instruments and see which one you click with.
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  #5  
Old 08-30-2017, 04:51 PM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
A lot of people on here will recommend a cajon. However, I've always enjoyed playing a djembe. If you go this route, look for a used Remo djembe that can be tuned with a drum key as opposed to ropes.
Yeah, that's the one in the video I posted. Gotta get me one soon.
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  #6  
Old 08-30-2017, 06:12 PM
Mungril Mungril is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Thank you for everyone's responses! After taking in your comments and researching a little more, I have found an interest in the Goblet Drums (eg. Darbuka, Doumbek, etc.), the Cajon and the Djembe. I still can't find a clear answer to which instrument is the best to play in terms of creating beats.
I also forgot to mention that I am looking for something that is more on the easy side to play. I understand I will have to learn some techniques to play these drums, but I am not looking to play something that involves numerous intricate techniques to play the instrument well. Also, although I like the sound of the Cajon, it seems awkward playing it while sitting on it. Is this something I should seriously consider or is it something that every player gets used to and eventually becomes irrelevant to the player?
Thanks again.
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  #7  
Old 08-30-2017, 07:00 PM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mungril View Post
Thank you for everyone's responses! After taking in your comments and researching a little more, I have found an interest in the Goblet Drums (eg. Darbuka, Doumbek, etc.), the Cajon and the Djembe. I still can't find a clear answer to which instrument is the best to play in terms of creating beats.
What do you mean by "creating beats"? You can definitely make interesting rhythmic patterns with any of them, using different sounds. Just don't expect it to sound anything near a drum kit.

My advice is to watch plenty of videos to get a good idea of the sonic range and versatility of each instrument. Also to get an idea of how difficult it looks to play it. Technique-wise, I'd say the cajon could be easier, even with the awkward posture, djembe second, and darbuka/doumbek the most difficult, if you expect to emulate the experts on the videos (you need lots of finger work for that). But if all you're interested in is making simple rhythm patterns, mostly combining low/high sounds and the occasional ornament, they're all equally easy to play, IMO.

I would probably start with either the cajon or the djembe, simply because you must hold a doumbek or darbuka with one arm and it can be uncomfortable.
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  #8  
Old 08-30-2017, 07:26 PM
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Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

There are so many hybrids today.

Djembes and cajons will be the most versatile if popular music, but kanjiras, darbukas and host of frame drums are also very versatile in their own way.

Bodhrans are cool.

I depends a bit on general style and dynamics.
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  #9  
Old 08-30-2017, 08:07 PM
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Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

If you want it to sound more like a drum-set beat, get a cajon with snares. If you want it to sound more like a hand drum, get a djembe.

Would not recommend "bass cajons" or weird shape ones. The basic one you sit on is the closest thing I've found to a single piece portable drum thing.
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  #10  
Old 08-30-2017, 08:16 PM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mungril View Post
Thank you for everyone's responses! After taking in your comments and researching a little more, I have found an interest in the Goblet Drums (eg. Darbuka, Doumbek, etc.), the Cajon and the Djembe. I still can't find a clear answer to which instrument is the best to play in terms of creating beats.
I also forgot to mention that I am looking for something that is more on the easy side to play. I understand I will have to learn some techniques to play these drums, but I am not looking to play something that involves numerous intricate techniques to play the instrument well. Also, although I like the sound of the Cajon, it seems awkward playing it while sitting on it. Is this something I should seriously consider or is it something that every player gets used to and eventually becomes irrelevant to the player?
Thanks again.
I'm also out with the jury on the cajon. I've seen some masterful people playing those things, but the position you're in to play it, for me, it's kinda' painful for my lower back to be hunched over like that all the time.

But you know, for the price of a good cajon or a djembe, you're almost at the price of good cheap drum set. Pearl has those little Roadshow jazz kits, that basically come with everything for under $400. Then you can really work on mimic-ing the beats you're hearing ;)

Just a suggestion ;)
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  #11  
Old 08-30-2017, 09:11 PM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Bo Eder View Post
But you know, for the price of a good cajon or a djembe, you're almost at the price of good cheap drum set. Pearl has those little Roadshow jazz kits, that basically come with everything for under $400. Then you can really work on mimic-ing the beats you're hearing ;)
Not sure I agree with this. Like I said above, I have two cajons, one is from a local brand, made with cheap wood, and cost $65 with a nice gig bag, the other is a Toca Bourdeaux, very nice finish, nice sound, better materials, considerably heavier, but cost me $200. And although I like the Toca a lot, I prefer playing the cheap one. Add a $15 foot shaker, a $30 wuhan splash, a cheap cymbal stand and a set of brushes (which I already had), and you get drum-like percussion for an acoustic set for less than $120-$130. And I can take it all in a single gig bag with shoulder straps. It's quite the opposite from a full drum kit.

On the other hand, I don't know if the OP already has a drum kit, but my impression was that he wanted to play something with his bare hands, which is also a different experience than playing a drum set with sticks.

I often leave my darbuka in the trunk of my car (except when it's too sunny). I can take it anytime and play anywhere. Sometimes I'm at a party in someone's house and a friend pulls out a guitar. I can go get my drum and join him. Nobody wants a drum kit in that scenario.
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  #12  
Old 08-30-2017, 09:20 PM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by fac View Post
Not sure I agree with this. Like I said above, I have two cajons, one is from a local brand, made with cheap wood, and cost $65 with a nice gig bag, the other is a Toca Bourdeaux, very nice finish, nice sound, better materials, considerably heavier, but cost me $200. And although I like the Toca a lot, I prefer playing the cheap one. Add a $15 foot shaker, a $30 wuhan splash, a cheap cymbal stand and a set of brushes (which I already had), and you get drum-like percussion for an acoustic set for less than $120-$130. And I can take it all in a single gig bag with shoulder straps. It's quite the opposite from a full drum kit.

On the other hand, I don't know if the OP already has a drum kit, but my impression was that he wanted to play something with his bare hands, which is also a different experience than playing a drum set with sticks.

I often leave my darbuka in the trunk of my car (except when it's too sunny). I can take it anytime and play anywhere. Sometimes I'm at a party in someone's house and a friend pulls out a guitar. I can go get my drum and join him. Nobody wants a drum kit in that scenario.
You don't have to agree, that's cool. Just a suggestion. I'm one of those guys who's decided long ago that I just don't go into those situations where you don't need or want drums. I can play a fair bit of conga but I'm not so desperate to play that I'll do anything to get the chance. On a gig I let the people who do that better than me have at it.
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  #13  
Old 08-30-2017, 09:33 PM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

If you want something that can do lots of sounds (drum kit sounds, congas, bongos, goblet drums, chromatic percussion, cajon, etc), and don't need it to be too portable, is a Roland Handsonic electronic percussion.

You will need somewhere to plug it in, maybe a sturdy snare or cymbal stand, and some sort of amplifier/speaker (or headphones), but you can choose among a wide range of sounds, and it's immensely fun to play. Plus you can plug one or two pedals to it and emulate a full drum kit. I have the HPD-10 (the smaller version) and it's one of my favorite electronic instruments.
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  #14  
Old 08-30-2017, 10:03 PM
mesazoo mesazoo is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

https://www.britishdrumco.com/itap
this is right up your alley.
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  #15  
Old 08-31-2017, 02:27 AM
Mungril Mungril is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by fac View Post
What do you mean by "creating beats"?
My bad for not specifying, the " beats" I'm looking to play are punchy/rock/pop, that's the best way to describe. This cover by blackbear I guess is an example of what type of beat I am looking to mimic on a hand drum, skip to 30 seconds: https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&s...ehtpFGVagWbjzw

Regarding why I am looking for a hand drum is that a drum kit just doesn't work out in my environment - size wise. And it seems like the closest thing to making pop/rock drum beats without a drum kit. Also, it seems to be much cheaper than a drum kit as someone has mentioned earlier, price is a big factor for me right now.
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  #16  
Old 08-31-2017, 05:51 AM
fac fac is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mungril View Post
Regarding why I am looking for a hand drum is that a drum kit just doesn't work out in my environment - size wise. And it seems like the closest thing to making pop/rock drum beats without a drum kit.
Actually, I think you might probably be happier with a pad-based electronic drum, like the Roland Handsonic I mentioned above or a Roland SPD-something. Current models (HPD-20 and SPD-30) are a bit expensive but you can probably find older models in the second-hand market for a good price.
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  #17  
Old 08-31-2017, 12:16 PM
Mungril Mungril is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by fac View Post
Actually, I think you might probably be happier with a pad-based electronic drum, like the Roland Handsonic I mentioned above or a Roland SPD-something. Current models (HPD-20 and SPD-30) are a bit expensive but you can probably find older models in the second-hand market for a good price.
This actually looks fun to play and something outside of the "hand drums" box (which I am all for, I just suggested hand drums because I had no other knowledge of what I should be looking for) but the Roland Handsonic range is still in excess of $350 for a 2nd hand HPD-10 which is just too much for me unfortunately.

After taking your guys' advice to continue to watch video's of the instruments on YouTube and doing more research, I have narrowed it down to the cajon. I am unsure how I will feel playing it, so I will be trying it at a music/percussion store first but, the cajon does fit the sound I am looking for to make pop/punchy beats.

A side note: I had never heard instruments such as the Roland Handsonic and the ITap and I am very curious of other instruments that fits my criteria of an instrument that can mimic a punchy/pop/rock beat. So anymore suggestions are definitely WELCOMED for not just me, but for anyone else who is just as curious as I am.

Thanks for everyone's input!
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  #18  
Old 08-31-2017, 03:54 PM
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Morrisman Morrisman is offline
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

I agree with the Remo djembe as above. Mine has a multicoloured cloth pattern. The synthetic head is more consistent than goat skin, and it can be tuned tight for a bright slap sound.

I had an LP djembe that was harder to hold and harder to play, although it looked better... But the Remo wins for me.
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Old 08-31-2017, 04:01 PM
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Default Re: Which Hand Drum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mungril View Post
Thank you for everyone's responses! After taking in your comments and researching a little more, I have found an interest in the Goblet Drums (eg. Darbuka, Doumbek, etc.), the Cajon and the Djembe. I still can't find a clear answer to which instrument is the best to play in terms of creating beats.
I also forgot to mention that I am looking for something that is more on the easy side to play. I understand I will have to learn some techniques to play these drums, but I am not looking to play something that involves numerous intricate techniques to play the instrument well. Also, although I like the sound of the Cajon, it seems awkward playing it while sitting on it. Is this something I should seriously consider or is it something that every player gets used to and eventually becomes irrelevant to the player?
Thanks again.
Have to say, I'm a modest drummer. But I've had the opportunity the last few weeks to tart about on a Djembe and I can play the hell out of it with my clumsy two hands.

Quite possibly the easiest instrument I've ever tried turning my hand to.

From my personal experience, anyone who can do a reasonable job of tapping out intricate rhythms on their steering wheel simply MUST be able to knock out some decent rhythm on a Djembe.

It's a real doddle.

Though, in absolute fairness, I'm not claiming that a seasoned Djembe drummer wouldn't come and show exactly how much better it CAN be played by someone who knows what they're doing. That part goes without saying.
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