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  #1  
Old 04-10-2017, 12:19 AM
cantstoplt021 cantstoplt021 is offline
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Default My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Does this happen to anyone else? Whenever I play someone else's kit I can't play well. I'm so used to my own kick pedal that most feel super sluggish and it throws everything off for me. Most of my drumming involves faster bass drum work and I typically can't do it with other pedals. As an aside is there a way to dial in pedals how you like them? I have a vintage DW5000 kick pedal that I love. I don't know how to describe it really, but it's very responsive and reboundy. I can play quick complicated things with ease. Other pedals feel almost heavy. Like I have to do all the work and I can't use rebound to my advantage. I'd almost describe it as playing rudiments on a snare vs a floor Tom. That kind of feeling
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Old 04-10-2017, 12:30 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Are you talking about other pedal on other drums? Maybe it's the batter head that is different. tight head rebound versus loose head rebound. If it's another drum you know you'll be playing take your pedal with you.
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Old 04-10-2017, 12:36 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

This happened to me when i was first starting out. It still happens occasionally with pedals that have no spring tension or batter heads that are JAW. Practice seems to have gotten rid of the sensation the majority of the time probably have better technique and more developed musculature now than i did then. And yes almost all pedals can be adjusted to taste. I'm partial to Tama Iron Cobras myself but i only end up playing those at home these days. most of the time i'm playing other peoples kits and other peoples pedals. I've learned to do some exercises with my right foot to get a good feel for the pedal similar to how i do a roll on the floor tom to determine the rebound i have to work with when i sit down at a new kit.
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Old 04-10-2017, 01:38 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

I think this is a lot of the reason why people bring their own pedal when using someone else's kit for a show. It's not just because it's "breakable" imo.
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Old 04-10-2017, 03:46 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

I rebound so I need spring tension. When I play a persons pedal who buries, typically, the spring tension is lax. So I can't get the power or speed I like. I just do the best I can which is not to my standards. Whatever.
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:08 AM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Well, you said you're using a DW5000, which a lot of other people use as well, and most pedals that I've ever sat in on, all tend to feel the same. Are you sure it's the pedal?

I get bringing your own pedal and all that, but there's something to be said about being able to sit down on any kit and just being able to play it. Perhaps as you get past some levels you'll be able to do this. You just gotta keep plugging away.
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:09 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Oh ya. Pedals are very personally adjusted. Or sometimes you've adjusted to the pedal. I think now days I can settle in on another's pedal pretty quick, but I always bring mine so I can use it. Years ago I really had a problem with anyone's but mine.
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  #8  
Old 04-10-2017, 04:23 AM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

I think the only thing I couldn't handle was one guy who had his bass drum pedal set up, but his beater was stuck farther down, shortening the effective stroke. He said it was for "volume purposes", and I just couldn't play it that way. I quickly unscrewed it and brought the beater up and tightened it again. How idiotic.

Try it sometime: take your beater and stick farther into the holder and tell me if you could play it that way. Craziness, I tell you!
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:38 AM
Groov-E Groov-E is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Yeah nah, I used a pearl demon drive and those babies a light, tight and not happening for my taste.

I am used to the trusty dw5000 or tama iC, and those yamahas are pretty cool as well.

But I feel the demon holding me back. I love a tensionless rebound with heavyweight on-demand quick attack if you give it some juice.

A springy no-rebound attack and superweight beater catches me offguard every single time. Yuk.

I love heavy beaters and slow rebound, that is how I stay in control. And I play pretty darn fast!
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:47 AM
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Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

When I started playing sure. The pedals on the school kits I has access to were also pretty much crap until I started replacing them.

Anyway, I think it's good to get used to different things and be "sound based" with your technique which is why I have diffeent ones.
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  #11  
Old 04-10-2017, 04:51 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Try it sometime: take your beater and stick farther into the holder and tell me if you could play it that way. Craziness, I tell you!

Agreed. if you try this be sure not to stick the other end through your bass drum head.
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Old 04-10-2017, 07:15 AM
dboomer dboomer is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

I hate using other people' s kits period.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2017, 08:10 AM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

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Originally Posted by dboomer View Post
I hate using other people' s kits period.
Well, sometimes, you have no choice. I've done several festival situations where a kit is provided (complete with everything) so drummers aren't clogging up the backstage area with more stuff than they have space for, which I totally get. And sometimes after I've parked and hiked in a fairly long distance, I'm happy I was only carrying a stick bag, you know?

Not that I'm lazy, but the difference between being the "headliner" and being "just another act" is mentally huge to me ;)
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Old 04-10-2017, 09:57 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

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Originally Posted by Matt Bo Eder View Post
I think the only thing I couldn't handle was one guy who had his bass drum pedal set up, but his beater was stuck farther down, shortening the effective stroke. He said it was for "volume purposes", and I just couldn't play it that way. I quickly unscrewed it and brought the beater up and tightened it again. How idiotic.

Try it sometime: take your beater and stick farther into the holder and tell me if you could play it that way. Craziness, I tell you!

My beater is pretty short, there's a place in the fulcrum when you shorten the beater where the feel becomes neutral, and you can get a lot of power because the beater can be moved faster forward when its not extended (weight overhead), or not as extended, the spring needs to be loose tho and sitting above your knees and slightly a back (calf fwd). An epiphany gotten actually from sitting-in on back line and other peoples kits, sometimes it clicks when you're on another kit and you adopt that ergonomic.




Quote:
Try it sometime: take your beater and stick farther into the holder and tell me if you could play it that way. Craziness, I tell you!

Agreed. if you try this be sure not to stick the other end through your bass drum head.

And yes Grunt, my beater shaft is clipped. When a beater is extended it takes more energy to control that overhead mass, get it moving and stop it from moving (end of back stroke). On a DW 5000 my beater measures 12" from bottom plate to the middle of the beater, spring on that 5000 doesn't even engage till the beater center is about 45 degrees from the BD head, that's how loose the spring is, at rest the beater is at 90 degrees before the spring engages on the other side, so from 90 to 45(ish) degrees there's no unloading of the springs tension to overcome, just the weight of a (lowered) beater head. Its a faster, easier stroke that responds to ones leg power more effortlessly.

I agree, it 'is' crazy... unless you find that neutral point where the beater essentially becomes easier to manage and your leg transfers power efficently with less effort, I call it 'the tipping point'.
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:21 PM
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Morrisman Morrisman is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

One really significant difference is the length of the footboard. I've been playing a nice house kit a lot lately that has a Ludwig Speed King. I can't get used to it - I keep leaving my heel resting on the footboard and it won't spring back. Drives me crazy. So I've started bringing my DW5000, which feels like home.
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:34 PM
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TripleStroke TripleStroke is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Of course every equipment are set differently than yours. Obviously takes greater toll on your consistent playing style when you are a beginner. Fact is though if you claim that ur drumming goes to hell because of this, then it simply means your playing is inconsistent. Now, you dont have to be a pro to be able to adapt to different pedal settings either. It requires proper retaining of muscle memory of your ankles. You may have a difficult time replicating what youre used to playing in terms of specific songs you worked hard to achieve, but general playing should not be affected greatly if you consider yourself a fairly consistent player. I think its also safe to assume that about any instruments really. I play piano as well and some piano keys are stiffer or softer than others. Same with the sustain pedals. But i cant bring my piano around now can i lol

Point being made i guess is that you can either be a homebody musician thus unable to get used to anything outside of your own equipment or you are thrown into diverse scenery of music events and have experience in handling other equipment with care and adaptation. Important thing is that one should not feel like they are inferior musicians for not being able to adapt to every equipment right away. You can always adjust them to make it feel similar to your own.

Only type of drummers where ive seen can play random equipment at consistent speed and familiarity at ease are those who has a college degree in drumming at the least and/or are professional drummers. So...

Last edited by TripleStroke; 04-10-2017 at 04:45 PM.
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  #17  
Old 04-12-2017, 09:33 PM
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philrudd philrudd is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

I'll tell you this - if someone was borrowing my pedal and 'dialed in' a bunch of new settings to better suit their tender sensibilities, I'd be ripshit.

If you really feel the need to alter the settings on each kick pedal...bring your own kick pedal. It could save you a punch in the neck.
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  #18  
Old 04-13-2017, 11:09 AM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

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Originally Posted by philrudd View Post
I'll tell you this - if someone was borrowing my pedal and 'dialed in' a bunch of new settings to better suit their tender sensibilities, I'd be ripshit.

If you really feel the need to alter the settings on each kick pedal...bring your own kick pedal. It could save you a punch in the neck.
No one in their right mind would change someone else's pedal setup I hope. Me, personally, I often use other people's pedals and they often feel a lot different. But I'm very much a "just get on with it" kind of guy.

I did have a comedy experience once playing someone's pedal with a very extended head....which got stuck in the front of the flare of my jeans. I didn't know what had happened initially other than I'd been struck with right leg paraplegia half way through a song.
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Old 04-13-2017, 11:25 AM
Woolwich Woolwich is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Perhaps not relevant and it's a story that I think I've shared here before.
In my youth I was interested in Mountain Biking and bought at least one magazine on the topic every month. I read an interview with Britains top downhill racer of the time in which he recounted how he would set his bike up differently for every course to get the most out of it but would regularly be beaten by his team mate. He asked his team mate how he did it and the answer was that this team mate had one set up on his bike, everything set in the middle!, so when he hit the hill he was adjusting his body to only the hill and not to the bike and to the hill.
This is slightly different as you're talking about pedals with different set ups but the answer is still the same in that it's best to adjust to what's put in front of you instead of worrying about it.
If you have a favourite pedal then take it with you to minimise issues, if the head tension is wrong for you on someone else's kit then at least you've done all you can to give your best. And without ruining your current set up, have an experiment with Spring tensions. I used to think I needed it tight for fast rebound etc but when I bought a new pedal I replicated the setting on the practice room pedal that I'd found so good and realised that for me a looser tension was actually better.
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Old 04-13-2017, 10:20 PM
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquadLeader View Post
No one in their right mind would change someone else's pedal setup I hope. Me, personally, I often use other people's pedals and they often feel a lot different. But I'm very much a "just get on with it" kind of guy.

I did have a comedy experience once playing someone's pedal with a very extended head....which got stuck in the front of the flare of my jeans. I didn't know what had happened initially other than I'd been struck with right leg paraplegia half way through a song.
I've done that. Very frustrating.

But regarding changing someone else's pedal setup - I was fearing that the OP (who sounds fairly new to drumming, and might not be up on some of the subtleties of etiquette) was considering changing the settings on whatever pedal he happened to be playing that night. He might not know that that simply doesn't fly with the vast majority of drummers.

I might take a few weeks, sometimes months, to experiment with different settings on a new pedal, and once the ideal setting is found, it stays there for the rest of the pedal's life. If I lent it out to some kid at a gig and he messed with the spring tension or beater angle...well, like I say, I'm just trying to help out the OP.

Like you, if I wind up having to use someone else's pedal, I just deal with the variance. But then again, that's why I always bring my own pedal.
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  #21  
Old 04-14-2017, 10:37 PM
Otto Otto is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Another thing to consider besides the pedal that can make even the best pedal feel 'off' is the height at which you are sitting.

Try experimenting with moving your config around.

Practice with variability if you want to be facile at playing on variable sets.
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  #22  
Old 04-17-2017, 11:17 AM
bud7h4 bud7h4 is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

Changing pedals would really mess me up when I was starting out. Not anymore, unless the pedal settings are goofy.
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  #23  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:44 PM
Wave Deckel Wave Deckel is offline
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Default Re: My drumming goes to hell with other people's bass pedals

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Originally Posted by dboomer View Post
I hate using other people' s kits period.
Most of the time... yes. I remember that I once played on a drumset with an old vintage Sonor pedal. It was so heavy, bulky, unresponsive. I could have kicked the bassdrum with my shoe only and the result would have been better... A nightmare of a pedal. Most entry-level pedals that I played had a better response and feel to them.

So yes, drumming skills can go downhill with a bad pedal. Which is why I'd always carry my Yamaha 9500D with me if I had to play on another guys drumset again..

Last edited by Wave Deckel; 04-17-2017 at 08:39 PM.
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