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  #1  
Old 03-18-2008, 02:00 AM
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Les Ismore Les Ismore is offline
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Default Axis Pedal.... revealed

Here's some pics of an Axis main shaft, what Axis refers to as the 'Axle Rod', Setting and adjustment sheet-http://www.axispercussion.com/technical_pedals.html


First thing you notice in Pic#1 is, this shaft is not the complete 3/8" monster hex piece the protruding end of an assembled Axis pedal might suggest. The hex piece is just a nut screwed onto a 1/4" round shaft. Complete shaft is around 3.25" end to end.

Another key thing that becomes evident is the (1.25") flat section of the shaft, where which the set screws of the 'Number One' piece secure to it. the set screw 'indents' on the flat section are the factory set positions.

You can see in pic# 2 these set screws were 'messed with. The shaft was rotated a mere 4mm thereby taking the set screw contact points 'off' the flat section and here also is where forum-member a58Chevy and others have encountered problems with the 'number-one' (and beater) slipping on the shaft.

Axis clearly states on their 'adjustment sheet' not to touch these 2 set screws. So yeah, it doesn't take much and you're into 'round-shaft-slippage' land. Refer to adjustment sheet for 'beater angle adjustment'. Don't turn these set screws thinking you're 'safely' affecting beater angle, its not the way, read the adjustment sheet in its entirety. Things aren't as obvious on these pedals as they seem, like the axle rod not being a complete hex.
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Last edited by Les Ismore; 03-18-2008 at 04:02 AM.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:08 AM
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

Pic#3 shows the retainer washer in the end of the 'Aux Head Assembly'. This would also be the same on the main pedal assembly, as Axis uses the same shaft, bearings and washers for both. Washer holds the shaft and bearings in 'number -one' assemblys.

Here in pic#4 we see the Axis shaft on top of the 'Auxiliary Head Assembly' in relation to where it would sit in the assembly.


Pics1 & 3 are important reference points, as they reveal two possible places (one more likely than the other) where you may find 'slop' in the workings of either the primary and/or auxiliary pedals. Slop which you may misdiagnose as being in the connecting (UDS) shaft between the two pedals.

To check for 'slop' in the system (on any double pedal), start with pedal's mounted in playing position on the drum(s). Grab/hold the beater shaft with one hand and the cam of the aux-pedal with the other, twist in opposite directions. If you feel 'play/slop' in the connection between the two pedals, there could be looseness in shaft-related places, or on the connecting shaft (UDS) itself, you need to find out exactly where the offending slop lives and make adjustments.

With Axis, the (UDS) connecting shaft is the easiest fix of all the possibles and should be checked first if you detect looseness in the system. To do this correctly you need to isolate the UDS by removing it from the pedals. Without it being removed/isolated, it can be fairly deceiving actually pinpointing where the slop lives. It may feel like its in the UDS, but could easily be in the one of the soon to be mentioned 'other' places.

With the UDS off the pedals, simply hold both ends and twist. There should be zero 'play' or looseness in the joints. If you find looseness on an Axis UDS, heat it in a 320 degree oven for 10 min. Remove (with pads, it'll be hot) and tighten the set screws on the loose joint. Before heating, inspect which set screws need to be tightened and be ready with the corresponding allen wrench Pic# 5 (below).

These pivoting joints are set in a block of LocTite which when heated, allows the set screws to be tightened/loosened. A brilliant Axis design feature allowing their UDS to be 'snugged up' to factory (or even custom) spec's by the user, thereby not forcing the system to used in varying degrees of decay (slop) till it becomes noticeably unplayable, as is the case with other brands which require complete replacement (no adjustment option) of a loose shaft.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:17 AM
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

If your UDS is tight, it means slop is alive and well somewhere else in your Axis system. Having ruled out the key operated screws that connect the UDS to the axle rods, next step would be checking the 'Number Ones' on the pedals, the two mains and the Aux with the UDS unconnected.

Hold the pedals main post and try to move the number one(s). On the main pedal you can affect the beater for increased leverage on the shaft. If (any) side-to-side movement is detected, there's a good chance and highly probable the retaining washer is loose and not snug on the bearing. Snugging can be done with needle nose pliers slightly opened spanning the axle rod resting on washer.

Alternate pushing on the washer with pliers at 12:00 and 6:00 and 3:00 and 9:00 o'clock till its snug. You shouldn't be able to feel the washer causing friction when you rotate the shaft/bearings, it should move freely. If you make it to tight (feel friction) you can press the hex side of the axle rod against the floor with slight pressure until it frees up.


On another Axis thread I mentioned Axis' (or is it Axi) were sensitive to 'placement' in relation to squareness 'on the floor'. I called it 'proper grounding' and would like to touch on it again a little here. If the pedals aren't working smoothly between themselves, it can easily lead to the UDS and other soon to be mentioned places becoming loose or even damaged. This lack of squareness/flatness is more likely to originate on the aux-pedal and its relation to the main pedal via the UDS, though not limited to it. Always check both pedals and assure proper grounding.

When setting up your Axis double pedal (or any double) connect the drive shaft (Axis-UDS) to the main (bass drum mounted) pedal first. Make sure your UDS slides fully onto the 'axle rod' then secure it tight in the desired position. Next, connect the other end to the Aux (secondary) pedals axle rod. Lift secondary pedal in the air and set it down 'squarely/flatly' on the floor in relation to the main pedal, meaning when the secondary pedal is depressed, the main pedal is not pushed or pulled in any direction, there should be 'solid' interplay between the two with no movement.

If secondary pedal is not 'square' to the floor in relation to the main, the main pedal will be 'jacked' around from foot pressure and the workings of the UDS. This will cause multiple problems, not the least of which is going to be poor playability. Take the time to get the two 'grounded' and working smoothly together 'before' you begin to play.

************************************************** ************************************************** ****


OK, I mentioned 'there's a good chance' and 'highly probable' in the second paragraph as to where slop may be lurking and here's why. Side to side movement on the 'number-ones' can also be a 'misdiagnosed' as a loose retaining washer, since its somewhat hidden and not as obvious as set screws are. We'll... refer back to pic# 1 as to why another Axis mystery is virtually undetectable from the outside.

When you look at pic#1 what you're actually looking at is a 'defective' axle-rod (shaft). Remember, Axis pedals/parts are handmade. The threads which receive the hex end-nut of this axle-rod were cut too long. These threads should not extend outside the nut... and why? If you look at pic# 2 you'll see this is where the bearing sits. On this particular shaft (it came off a Aux Number-One), slop was detected but couldn't be pinpointed until the pedal was taken apart revealing the bearing sitting on thread's.

So, if your retaining washer is snug and everything else is tight, there's a (very) remote possibility this could be the problem. Remote because the pictured shaft shouldn't have made it on a pedal. Axis claims its the only one they know of and I believe them after talking with them while correcting the problem.

Start the negative comments barage? I can find screw-ups on just about any pedal run in production, things happen. I wouldn't go as far as knocking Axis for this one oversight, unless its proven to be more common than not, which I doubt..
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Last edited by Les Ismore; 03-18-2008 at 02:52 AM.
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Old 03-24-2012, 04:31 AM
DJgrind DJgrind is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

This may be a little late of a reply but I just discovered this thread. I've noticed that when I have my axis pedals set up with the UDS and Aux BUT without putting my beater in the Aux, there is no slag at all, in fact the slave pedal is just as smooth as it would be if it were separated. But as soon as I put my beater into the slot in the Aux (I use the normal axis beaters) I start getting this lag from the slave pedal, it feels as if it's clunky and not responsive at all. I've used my UDS on a different pair of pedals and it works fine, plus it's brand new. My Aux on the other hand is old, and the washer that you mentioned in pic #3 is kind of loose, but when I tighten it in (which I do by pushing it in with pliers) it gets a bit tighter but the slag still exists...

Any suggestions? Thanks for you consideration!

-Dan
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:11 AM
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

as soon as I put my beater into the slot in the Aux (I use the normal axis beaters) I start getting this lag from the slave pedal, it feels as if it's clunky and not responsive at all.


Lag as you're referring to isn't the same as 'play'.

Play- is the mechanical result of loose tolerances with regards to parts.

Lag- is is the mechanical result of parts set-up in a way they produce a lag due to your playing style/technique.


Slag- would be the combination of both.


the washer that you mentioned in pic #3 is kind of loose

If you mean there's noticeable play side-side/up-down on the AUX main shaft, there's a slight chance the main shaft could be defective. I had one once and that's actually it in pic #1 now that I remember-

The threads were cut too long, the bearing sat on the threads, resulting in a little bit of play up-down on the shaft. If you can isolate the 'play' to the main shaft this 'may' be your problem, the the retaining clip being tight etc.
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Last edited by Les Ismore; 03-26-2012 at 12:46 AM.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:42 AM
GrooveSuperfly GrooveSuperfly is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

I have to bring upp this thread again...

Is it possible to change out just axle rod thats goes out from left slavepedal?
And to replace only that bearing "connector" shown down on the image #5 ?
(Connector - part on shaft axle, that you attach to the axle rod)

Mine are no longer hexagon shaped - they are more , like round :-(
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  #7  
Old 06-07-2012, 08:49 PM
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooveSuperfly View Post
I have to bring upp this thread again...

Is it possible to change out just axle rod thats goes out from left slavepedal?
And to replace only that bearing "connector" shown down on the image #5 ?
(Connector - part on shaft axle, that you attach to the axle rod)

Mine are no longer hexagon shaped - they are more , like round :-(


The hex design was first generation, all the AXIS UDS' are round now.

The hex ones are smaller/lighter.

So your hex shaft is a desirable, discontinued piece to someone who knows/wants. Problem is there might only be one, maybe two of these people in existence.
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Old 01-26-2014, 07:46 AM
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theindian theindian is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

This thread has been very helpful. I just pulled my pedals out of storage after a long break. I tightened the retainer washers & reset the UDS.

There is still some slop on the heel block, which allows the footboard to slightly move back & forth horizontally. It seems the loc-tite has worn off on the screws with the rolling ball tip.
I assume the way to fix this would be: take the screws out, coat with loc-tite, & then re-install.

I had to do this several years ago on another pedal but I have to be careful how tight I set the screws. Too tight & the pedal won't move, or if too loose then there will still be slop. I want to get close to factory.

Any suggestions?
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  #9  
Old 02-03-2014, 10:32 AM
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Les Ismore Les Ismore is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

Quote:
Originally Posted by theindian View Post
This thread has been very helpful. I just pulled my pedals out of storage after a long break. I tightened the retainer washers & reset the UDS.

There is still some slop on the heel block, which allows the footboard to slightly move back & forth horizontally. It seems the loc-tite has worn off on the screws with the rolling ball tip.
I assume the way to fix this would be: take the screws out, coat with loc-tite, & then re-install.

Any suggestions?



No, don't coat anything with LOC TITE.

You would heat the heel block in the oven the same way you'd heat and tighten an AXIS UDS.
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  #10  
Old 02-03-2014, 10:38 AM
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Les Ismore Les Ismore is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooveSuperfly View Post
I have to bring upp this thread again...

Is it possible to change out just axle rod thats goes out from left slavepedal?
And to replace only that bearing "connector" shown down on the image #5 ?
(Connector - part on shaft axle, that you attach to the axle rod)

Mine are no longer hexagon shaped - they are more , like round :-(


AXIS did away with the hex shaped UDS joints, they were smaller than the new round ones. The hex ones would fit in a 1.5" PVC tube which made a pretty cool carrier (and weapon).

Why would you want to replace it in the first place? The new round ones work just as good, they're just bigger.
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  #11  
Old 02-17-2014, 03:03 PM
shredfreak shredfreak is offline
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Default Re: Axis Pedal.... revealed

Finally got mine back in perfect working order think it just took me about an hour to get the screws aligned again with the flat section of the shaft.

The left pedal always felt funny & didn't respond too great, and the left beater started moving backwards a bit too.

At least i got them for pisscheap since the previous owner seemed happy to get rid of them.
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