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  #921  
Old 01-09-2013, 05:17 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Huge fan, love the playing, the writing, the wisdom, the humor of this man. Great influence on my playing, and my attitude toward music in general. Play what you love, not what sells. Push yourself to be the best you can be, don't rest on your laurels.
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  #922  
Old 01-14-2013, 04:43 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Had to comment, even though this thread has been around for ages. I enjoy listening to Peart even now, although it's different that when I listened 25 years ago.

One of the things that people touch on over and over again is his consistency of delivery. But while I am sure he vamped a lot when they were writing and testing out new songs, there is something else at play here. One of the things I really respect about Neil is his composition of the drum track. By his own admission, he scores his own work like a dancer or ice skater would learn a new routine. It's all about telling the story, no different than how the vocalist or guitarist tells it. I learned from him that scoring a part can help transport the listener or it can hinder them. There are rules within music theory as well as popular music. They are important because they are the history of vocabulary by which you start telling your story. Do you push the song or do you pull it? Straight time, double time or half time? All of these choices play into the mood you create for the listener. He builds his groove, building his fills as well and sometimes breaking down the groove altogether the second time through. Others known for progressive styles have tried this. Some succeeded and some failed in their telling of the story. It is that grasp of the theory and history of drumming that excites me when I hear Neil.

The other thing that impressed me is that he has continued to seek out others who would help him hone his craft. Even after all these years, he continues to look up other drummers who might help him learn a thing or two.
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  #923  
Old 02-05-2013, 04:16 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by iplaypearldrumsfl View Post
Subdivisions........................be cool or be caaaaaast oouuuuuuut.


Signals.....my favorite....I lost track after the "nut & bolt " CD...lol.....
Found this drum-only camera video of him. I'd forgotten just how physically hard he strikes the drums.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MavlwR1z6hE

Last edited by Jeremy Bender; 02-05-2013 at 04:44 AM.
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  #924  
Old 02-09-2013, 06:18 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

He has said in the past he pretty much hits them as hard as he can!
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  #925  
Old 02-09-2013, 06:49 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by John T View Post
He has said in the past he pretty much hits them as hard as he can!
i don't think that is the case all..... especially after studying with Freddie Gruber
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  #926  
Old 02-09-2013, 07:29 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Maybe he was telling porky pies then!
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  #927  
Old 07-20-2013, 04:13 AM
chasekratzer chasekratzer is offline
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Default Neil Peart

Any comments on Neil Peart?

He is one of my favs, and considered one of the greatest drummers.

If you want, check out the book "Taking center stage." One of my fav drum books.

My fav rush songs include "Tom Sawyer", "Subdivisions", "Spirit Of The Radio" and "Fly By Night". But my two absolute favs are "Presto" and "Bravado". I also like "The Trees" and "New World Man".
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  #928  
Old 07-20-2013, 09:49 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I think the thing that I am most impressed with by Neil Peart is how his drum solos evolved over the years, I have the R30 dvd (is it Der Troemlerr?) and there are parts of that, crafted, piece which were in his work back in the day.
I haven't seen Anatomy of...but I should imagine it's real interesting. PLUS his work with Buddys band, plus the fact that he changes between grips...great drummer.
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  #929  
Old 07-21-2013, 03:29 AM
chasekratzer chasekratzer is offline
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Default

Here is a video to check out. It is it a Neil Peart drum solo, filmed from the David Letterman show in June 2011.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meJ55HPJ3xs

I like the book "Taking Center Stage" feat. Neil Peart

Last edited by Arky; 07-21-2013 at 04:37 PM. Reason: Edited by Arky: merging consecutive posts
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  #930  
Old 08-19-2013, 08:06 AM
Distant Overture Distant Overture is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

The thing about Neil is that you won't hear a simple rock beat repeat for the whole song. He has his ways of changing it up. R30 Overture is one of my favourites just because of the mix of songs. I've always been a fan of his ride pattern from spirit of radio, subdivisions etc.
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  #931  
Old 08-19-2013, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Distant Overture View Post
The thing about Neil is that you won't hear a simple rock beat repeat for the whole song. He has his ways of changing it up. R30 Overture is one of my favourites just because of the mix of songs. I've always been a fan of his ride pattern from spirit of radio, subdivisions etc.
Neil Peart is the god of all Gods in drumming, however, i am not sure what you say is true when I hear his drumming, he seems to play exactly like it was recorded and he wants everything written as well...i am not saying thats bad....
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  #932  
Old 09-12-2013, 08:13 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Happy Birthday Neil


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  #933  
Old 10-02-2013, 08:36 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

From Billboard (http://www.billboard.com/articles/ne...sessions-video).

"Rush's Neil Peart Fills It Up In Vertical Horizon 'Instamatic' Sessions: Video Exclusive"
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  #934  
Old 11-02-2014, 01:23 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Newfound appreciation for Peart here. I've read criticisms that his playing is too mechanical, nevertheless it's perfect for Rush. Anything else would sound too generic, or too aggressive, or just out of place, etc etc.

I do a lot of improvising to many kinds of music (just for practice). When I try this with Rush it sounds rediculous. Stray too far from Neil's style and it just does not work with their music. And nailing the drums as written really is enjoyable for me, more so than any other band.

Listening to Peart has possibly improved my own playing more than anything else. While I don't actually play like him, I certainly have incorporated much of his style.

Last edited by bud7h4; 11-02-2014 at 09:57 AM.
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  #935  
Old 11-02-2014, 05:17 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Peart fits perfect for Rush... simple as that!
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  #936  
Old 11-02-2014, 05:31 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I'm a Rush fan and a Neil Peart fan. I kinda lost interest in Rush with Roll The Bones and never really gravitated toward anything after.

In recent year's I've come to like Neil's more fluid playing style and the changes he started to make after the Burning for Buddy stuff and Buddy Rich memorial show he participated in. He really saw his own playing limitations while working on that stuff and observing top shelf players.

He's much more fluid than before and doesn't just power his way through everything like before. He'll never be a Dennis Chambers or Steve Smith, but you can really see the progression in his playing and technique.
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  #937  
Old 11-02-2014, 05:44 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

objectively, I think Neil really created a new and large vocabulary based around what fit Rush . Of course he borrowed, but his early playing style and even now is quite verbose. Personally, I love it and am not worthy :-)

I don't think he can really be compared to anyone else....better, worse, equal....does not matter, he developed an outstanding kind of different.

When you really objectively think about the three greatest known drummers of the last 50 or 60 years...and you look at originality, innovation, ability and library it's hard not to say Buddy, Bonzo, Neil.

Neil is/was a very concise, accurate and loud talking drummer with very distinctive parts.
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  #938  
Old 11-02-2014, 01:27 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by shemp View Post

When you really objectively think about the three greatest known drummers of the last 50 or 60 years...and you look at originality, innovation, ability and library it's hard not to say Buddy, Bonzo, Neil.
That's interesting because I wouldn't put Bonham or Peart in that type of class. Maybe Buddy since he was ridiculously skilled and admired.
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  #939  
Old 11-04-2014, 04:16 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Williams View Post
Peart fits perfect for Rush... simple as that!
I agree... He perfectly fits in Rush...he is the professor, the best talented drummer in my honest opinion.

but he never fits for any Who songs....his playing of the Who cover songs does sound more defined and clearer and not "sloppier" and more lively like Moonies works..
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  #940  
Old 11-04-2014, 05:49 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Pachikara-Tharakan View Post
I agree... He perfectly fits in Rush...he is the professor, the best talented drummer in my honest opinion.

but he never fits for any Who songs....his playing of the Who cover songs does sound more defined and clearer and not "sloppier" and more lively like Moonies works..
Very true...Keith Moon cannot be recreated; what an original, bombastic and unique voice. He was a real gift to the drumming community.

Of course old Keith would not have a snowball's chance recreating the Professor's unique and challenging works either. By definition that makes them both stand out even more and means each had/has their own very unique voice.
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  #941  
Old 11-04-2014, 05:50 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Brian View Post
That's interesting because I wouldn't put Bonham or Peart in that type of class. Maybe Buddy since he was ridiculously skilled and admired.

Well how does one measure originality? I know one thing, I can tell Neil Peart's drumming instantly. Add to the technical skills and maybe he does fit that category. John Bonham as well. I'd have to think about other drummers. You can tell Keith Moon's drumming easily as well. But I do not view him as technically strong as the others mentioned.
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  #942  
Old 11-04-2014, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Shemp..i agree with you....all drummers are unique and all are good ..i dont see any drummer that bores me in any studio recorded Rock Music..unless it is some sampling or robotic .... ....Moonie would never in his life would be able to play along an AC/DC track or a Rush Track so precisely..or even called to sit in for Steely Dan.
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  #943  
Old 11-04-2014, 06:50 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pachikara-Tharakan View Post
I agree... He perfectly fits in Rush...he is the professor, the best talented drummer in my honest opinion.

but he never fits for any Who songs....his playing of the Who cover songs does sound more defined and clearer and not "sloppier" and more lively like Moonies works..
Neil has mentioned many times in interviews Moon is one of his biggest influences, and but he once joined a band that played Who covers and he found he hated playing like Moon.

Which I get. I love listening to Peart, but I don't much care for playing like Peart. And I love Moon, but trying to play his style is exhausting.
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  #944  
Old 11-04-2014, 08:04 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by drummer-russ View Post
Well how does one measure originality? I know one thing, I can tell Neil Peart's drumming instantly. Add to the technical skills and maybe he does fit that category. John Bonham as well. I'd have to think about other drummers. You can tell Keith Moon's drumming easily as well. But I do not view him as technically strong as the others mentioned.
I think of many other drummers as "top 3 all-around" before Neil, but I really do like some of Rush's music.
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  #945  
Old 11-04-2014, 08:17 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Brian View Post
I think of many other drummers as "top 3 all-around" before Neil, but I really do like some of Rush's music.
It's certainly subjective to a degree from a drummer's perspective as they evaluate a drummer and try to see who is the "best"...there is no best, but when you look at popularity, longevity and originality though; Neil is very likely in the top 3 if not top 1.

There is no "better" drummer at that level...they are all pros and fantastic drummers...I don't care if Neil "can't play" jazz or buddy can't play funk and all that horse puckey and ridiculous nonsensical drivel (Can Tom Brady play RB or Wideout?)....

Peart was/is wildly original, talented and has an enormous vocabulary of drum parts and library of work...undeniable.

The masses he has influenced are at least equal to Buddy and Bonzo if not more...although I recognize there is no Neil Bash or Burning for Peart :-)
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  #946  
Old 11-05-2014, 02:00 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Agreed that Peart is an amazing and hugely influential rock drummer, and a phenomenal drummer for Rush. I'm a huge Rush fan and have seen them in concert many times.

Popularity, originality, and longevity, if they are your metrics, then Peart has a place, but I think there are others who at least rival him even on those metrics, outside of Buddy Rich and Bonzo (Billy Cobham, Phil Collins, and Dave Grohl are a few that immediately come to mind).

Not sure if you were being serious, but Buddy definitely can lay it down and funk it up if needed. But Peart can't play jazz, or even really swing for that matter, which is painfully obvious on those Buddy Rich memorial concerts. The greats can excel across genres.
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  #947  
Old 11-05-2014, 02:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Hewitt2 View Post
Agreed that Peart is an amazing and hugely influential rock drummer, and a phenomenal drummer for Rush. I'm a huge Rush fan and have seen them in concert many times.

Popularity, originality, and longevity, if they are your metrics, then Peart has a place, but I think there are others who at least rival him even on those metrics, outside of Buddy Rich and Bonzo (Billy Cobham, Phil Collins, and Dave Grohl are a few that immediately come to mind).

Not sure if you were being serious, but Buddy definitely can lay it down and funk it up if needed. But Peart can't play jazz, or even really swing for that matter, which is painfully obvious on those Buddy Rich memorial concerts. The greats can excel across genres.
I would say Cobham is a drummers drummer....he has no where near the mass popularity of Peart....or albums sold or face recognition, etc. Grohl is also very popular and a very solid drummer....but not in the same dimension as Peart in terms of drumming vocabulary.

There are folks....on here even...that have questioned buddy in the Rock and funk domains....I sure do not question buddy on anything; I still don't see anyone with his snare chops and clarity of notes and rolls or sequences.

Again though, I don't need buddy to play like Neil or vice versa for them to be great....to be honest....I've watched all the burning for buddy stuff and as great as all of the drummers are, I don't hear any of them playing things like Time Check with same groove and mojo as buddy. To my ears it is not there with any of the guys playing those tunes....in comparison to buddy that is.

I don't care if Neil cannot swing and I think that has been overstated to death....he doesn't need to....he really created his own language.....very precise, killer tones, a library of fills and sequences that is mind boggling.....and he has countless disciples that are the best of the best in the younger generations....the influence is unquestionable.
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  #948  
Old 11-05-2014, 03:14 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

what about guys like Ringo, Travis Barker, and Gene Krupa; plenty of popularity, longevity, and originality on display.
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  #949  
Old 11-05-2014, 05:01 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by shemp View Post
...there is no best, but when you look at popularity, longevity and originality though; Neil is very likely in the top 3 if not top 1.
Sure Buddy, Neil and Bonzo are three of the biggest names to non-drummers. I can see that argument. Let's look from a drummers perspective, though. That's where the argument would end for me.
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  #950  
Old 11-06-2014, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Brian View Post
I think of many other drummers as "top 3 all-around" before Neil, but I really do like some of Rush's music.
Agreed. as far as "all-around" drummers, I think we need to look at more drummers that are not tied to one band, ie..Steve Gadd, Keith Carlock, Dennis Chambers....etc..
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  #951  
Old 11-06-2014, 09:38 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

After owning (and watching a couple times) his video called Taking Center Stage, I have nothing but the utmost respect for the guy. Not that I didn't before, but seeing him in that video helped me to better understand where his music comes from and how he developed his style and arrangements.
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  #952  
Old 11-26-2014, 12:32 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Neil's known for being a heavy hitter, as mentioned many times here. And wouldn't you know it, when I'm playing rush covers I play his songs the same way; harder and with more snap than most other music.

His drumming is just somehow written that way, lol. It just feels like snap! pow! If I intentionally hold back it feels wrong, I'm no longer in there, I'm just playing to the song, not playing the song.
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  #953  
Old 01-03-2015, 04:39 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I've been studying Neil since I first saw Rush in 2007 on Snakes and Arrows. I endured a similar tragedy not long after seeing them and found strength in his book Ghost Rider and his playing. guy loses everything, considers retirement, comes back, 62 years old and he can make a 9ft wide kit shake on its mounting hardware for 3 hours straight.

wish I had found them a little earlier, they were on fire on R30. the R30 black sparkle kit was no joke either.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJfId5C-DWQ

his technical playing aside, one of my favorite things Neil does is just driving 4/4 quarter notes on the kick. Subdivisions 7/4 to 4/4 transition gets me every time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0dpJmBHtDs

that floor tom sound!
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  #954  
Old 01-04-2015, 08:55 AM
davidbehrens3.14 davidbehrens3.14 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Neil Peart has lots of talent. If you watch him solo or play with Rush, you can tell that he's got a good musical mind, nice chops and some impressive abilities altogether.
There are three things about NP that throw him off the mark for me:

1.) He cannot swing... from a TREE. I defy you to find a video of NP "Jazz" drumming (which is mostly at Buddy Rich Memorials) that we can agree is remotely acceptable to the language of swing. Neil plays prog, and should stick to it.

2.) He's big. Let's face it... many of us once thought NP was "the very best" before we discovered Buddy, Vinnie, Gadd, Weckl, Cobham, etc. He is pretty obviously behind those folks and many more. It doesn't have to annoy everyone, but I sometimes get a bit irked when guys like him, Tre Cool, Travis Barker, etc. are being over-recognized like that. He seems to have absorbed it a bit as well, as you can see in the way he talks about music and playing. Eh.

3.) He's a machine. Many people don't know this, but NP orchestrates EVERYTHING. He writes out parts, and plays everything, note-for-note, according to a plan, every show, every recording -- including grooves, fills, and entire solos. This works really well in Rush, but at the same time, defies a lot of what prog is all about. I don't really like Dream Theater or Adrenaline Mob, but I can really appreciate what Mike Portnoy does with HIS prog playing, because there's more intensity, emotion, and voice... which is a big part of prog. My most ideal example is Genesis. Phil Collins (and Chester Thompson, for live shows) had something raw in the sound that made it more progressive, because it was more real. So enough of this, "here's how to play THIS song" stuff.

As a side note, Neil has a couple embarrassing moments as a lyricist (Though 'The Trees' and a few others make up for it). But in general, there are a few reasons I 'grew out of' my N.P. phase at about 14, and it started with better exposure to all different kinds of jazz and other genres, and the bigger world of real, really good drummers.


P.S. -- For those wondering, it IS, in fact, pronounced 'Pee - rt' (Rhymes with 'Fear') as opposed to the commonly mistaken 'Purt' (Rhymes with 'Hurt').
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  #955  
Old 01-05-2015, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

I'm not a real big Rush fan - when the songs come on the radio I don't change the station, but I don't have any Rush albums in my collection. (There may be a cassette of 'Moving Pictures' around here somewhere, but that's about it.) Further, I basically evolved from a punk ethos, so the slickness and popularity of Rush and its members were instinctively anathema; I could appreciate it, but never truly accept it.

However, whenever I hear Neil Peart playing, I pause for a minute, and always wind up telling myself the same thing: 'I really need to up my drumming game.'

I don't want to play like Peart, but the precision and composition of his playing are inspiring; I feel like I should be getting more out of my instrument when I hear his drumming.

So even if I'm not a fan - especially since I'm not a fan - it takes a pretty awesome drummer to inspire me like that.
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  #956  
Old 01-10-2015, 07:57 PM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbehrens3.14 View Post
1.) He cannot swing... from a TREE. I defy you to find a video of NP "Jazz" drumming (which is mostly at Buddy Rich Memorials) that we can agree is remotely acceptable to the language of swing. Neil plays prog, and should stick to it.
I agree he shouldn't even try. his robotic precision style doesn't lend itself well to swing. I love Rush but sometimes his playing is almost too precise, not going to go so far as to say it lacks feel but it's just too perfect sometimes. the sheer energy he expends makes up for any lack of feel live in concert.

watch the videos from Toronto Rocks in 2003. they weren't on tour at the time. Geddy and Alex made some mistakes, Neil was like a machine. you don't realize how good he is until you hear the rest of the band playing below 100%
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  #957  
Old 02-10-2015, 12:32 AM
davidbehrens3.14 davidbehrens3.14 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by Hewitt2 View Post
Not sure if you were being serious, but Buddy definitely can lay it down and funk it up if needed.
Ehh.. kind of. Buddy plays a good amount of funk, especially on his later records. But it's not great funk. For instance, the opening track on 'Very Live at Buddy's Place' is the saddest, whitest version of Chameleon you will ever hear. He's mostly a big band drummer. He can't really do Bebop either...
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:21 AM
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Hewitt2 Hewitt2 is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by davidbehrens3.14 View Post
Ehh.. kind of. Buddy plays a good amount of funk, especially on his later records. But it's not great funk. For instance, the opening track on 'Very Live at Buddy's Place' is the saddest, whitest version of Chameleon you will ever hear. He's mostly a big band drummer. He can't really do Bebop either...
Buddy couldn't (or didn't) play country, metal, raggae, or countless other styles either. Not sure what your point is? Are you saying he was less of a drummer because as a jazz musician he didn't play bop?

By your logic, would Louis Armstrong be less of a musician or trumpet player because he similarly avoided bop music?

In any event, while Buddy truly made a name for himself in the big band setting, there are quite a few recordings of him playing with brushes and in a smaller ensemble setting where he plays quite tastefully. While not "bop," he is certainly more multi-faceted than perhaps you give him credit for.
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Old 02-10-2015, 08:36 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

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Originally Posted by davidbehrens3.14 View Post
He can't really do Bebop either...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOWd4_UR-Ys

Sure, it ain't his bread and butter. But it's a pretty convincing attempt nonetheless.

I get that it wasn't the whole focus of your point, but at the very least it's worthy of a little more credit than "can't really do", I reckon.

Last edited by Pocket-full-of-gold; 02-10-2015 at 10:59 AM.
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Old 02-10-2015, 04:32 PM
TheHeelDrummer TheHeelDrummer is offline
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Default Re: Neil Peart

People seem to be on both sides of the fence with the fact that he plays everything note for note.

The way I see it, a song is constantly evolving. What you lay down in the studio is the song in its infancy and what you come out with after touring it (many times) is the evolution of the song.

When you play everything note for note, show after show, tour after tour, year after year... you are ignoring an important part of a live performance and that particular song.

Its not Brittney Spears "Oops I did it again" meant to be played as a track exactly the same every time. Its a musical composition that was created with pride and should be continued to be worked on and improved each time you play it.

I am completely not into a band that plays like a cd. To me, its lazy. You are too lazy to creatively expand to what you originally laid down.

And people that say it is too hard to improvise on Rush stuff... Thats just not true. Peart's stuff does not evolve. It is what it is and thats all it will ever be.
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