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  #1  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:16 AM
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HerpsMcDerps HerpsMcDerps is offline
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Default Recording for Dummies?

I bought a bunch of equipment a while back, as I'm prone to do. I had the intent of recording myself and my band just for fun, because I'm interested in learning how to do it. Anyway, I have essentially all of the equipment I need to start recording some drums and fidgeting with the software, is there any online resources that offer tips for recording? I realize that I'm a total noob at this, I'm just eager to learn.
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  #2  
Old 02-20-2013, 06:13 AM
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Bo Eder Bo Eder is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsMcDerps View Post
I bought a bunch of equipment a while back, as I'm prone to do. I had the intent of recording myself and my band just for fun, because I'm interested in learning how to do it. Anyway, I have essentially all of the equipment I need to start recording some drums and fidgeting with the software, is there any online resources that offer tips for recording? I realize that I'm a total noob at this, I'm just eager to learn.
Since you got all the stuff, I would suggest just diving in and using it. You will find out what works as you learn how to use your gear. Know your owners manuals well and be able to manipulate your software and gear to get the best possible sounds. After you've spent a few months recording stuff, you'll be ready.
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Old 02-20-2013, 09:43 PM
x_25 x_25 is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

There are tons of resources out there (including recording for dummies!). While a lot of people think there are forumlas for doing stuff (and there can be) it is really all about experimentation and getting the best sound any way that works. Doesn't matter how weird it is, if it sounds good, it's good.

I will reccomend the book "mix secrets for the small studio" though it assumes you have all the basics already. "Home recordingfor dummies" was actually quite a good start for me. But, as with anything, there is no replacement for experiance and knowing your equiptment! So dive right in and see what happens.
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Old 02-20-2013, 11:13 PM
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skod skod is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Count me as another one for "just dive in", but with a caveat- and a hard-learned one at that. Avoid analysis paralysis at all costs!

I've now owned 3 project studios. I've been a member of the Audio Engineering Society since the 70s, so you can see a little of my approach: I'm arguably a better engineer than player. I had the first two of them set up quite well, with great mic collections, acoustic treatments, and all the wonderful and expensive bells and whistles needed to allow a decent engineer to get professional results. Actually made a little money, and definitely made some good recordings in them. But all that work ended up being for other people- I was so obsessed with achieving perfection that I essentially stopped doing my own music. When working for a client, there's a definite end point: at which they take the master and leave. Unfortunately, it is not so with one's own work.

When I sold off Son of Scratchpad Studio, I told myself that I'd never do it again- that I would just work on my own stuff, and stop allowing the perfect to become the enemy of the good. "Just for fun" can become "just a few more takes and some more sweetening... but ooh what's that new (plug-in/box/mic) do?" altogether too easily. It is seductive: the siren song of all that technology is *very* strong.

When I set up my current Return of Son of Scratchpad Studio, I deliberately kept it trivially simple and low-tech: literally, specifically to force it to be a songwriter's scratchpad like its namesake, *and nothing more*. "Print it and move on" has become my mantra. Don't allow yourself to get so bogged down in the minutiae of recording that you lose sight of the music.

Many, many people need to celebrate their musicianship, and not attempt to impose engineering upon themselves. One of my favorite bassists literally gave up music and took up golf after getting lost in the pursuit of perfection, and especially in the frustration of getting the gear to work the way he wanted. It sounds like a cliche, but it is absolutely true. If you have *any trace* of the gearhead and/or perfection addict in your makeup (or are prone to any other form of addiction), go forward with some caution, and keep it light and easy. Bits are a lot cheaper than tape used to be, for sure, and you can do a lot with very little- but do it to get the ideas printed, not to create the next great Tubular Bells.

If you can keep the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good, more power to you- you'll have a blast. But if one day you find yourself at the driving range blasting away at a bucket of balls because of the 25th mid-take Blue Screen Of Death for the day, remember these words... (;-)
__________________
Nerd without portfolio...

Last edited by skod; 02-20-2013 at 11:23 PM.
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:53 PM
pinoydrummer pinoydrummer is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Thanks for this thread as I'm also a recording newbie. I'm now setting up a
really simple room studio to record my drum covers.

I'm planning on a 3 mic setup (kick, snare, overhead condenser).

My question is should I buy a mixer or an audio interface? I'm planning to use
a PC for my recordings.

Last edited by pinoydrummer; 02-21-2013 at 01:56 PM. Reason: Added information
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  #6  
Old 02-25-2013, 11:53 AM
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HerpsMcDerps HerpsMcDerps is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skod View Post
Count me as another one for "just dive in", but with a caveat- and a hard-learned one at that. Avoid analysis paralysis at all costs!

I've now owned 3 project studios. I've been a member of the Audio Engineering Society since the 70s, so you can see a little of my approach: I'm arguably a better engineer than player. I had the first two of them set up quite well, with great mic collections, acoustic treatments, and all the wonderful and expensive bells and whistles needed to allow a decent engineer to get professional results. Actually made a little money, and definitely made some good recordings in them. But all that work ended up being for other people- I was so obsessed with achieving perfection that I essentially stopped doing my own music. When working for a client, there's a definite end point: at which they take the master and leave. Unfortunately, it is not so with one's own work.

When I sold off Son of Scratchpad Studio, I told myself that I'd never do it again- that I would just work on my own stuff, and stop allowing the perfect to become the enemy of the good. "Just for fun" can become "just a few more takes and some more sweetening... but ooh what's that new (plug-in/box/mic) do?" altogether too easily. It is seductive: the siren song of all that technology is *very* strong.

When I set up my current Return of Son of Scratchpad Studio, I deliberately kept it trivially simple and low-tech: literally, specifically to force it to be a songwriter's scratchpad like its namesake, *and nothing more*. "Print it and move on" has become my mantra. Don't allow yourself to get so bogged down in the minutiae of recording that you lose sight of the music.

Many, many people need to celebrate their musicianship, and not attempt to impose engineering upon themselves. One of my favorite bassists literally gave up music and took up golf after getting lost in the pursuit of perfection, and especially in the frustration of getting the gear to work the way he wanted. It sounds like a cliche, but it is absolutely true. If you have *any trace* of the gearhead and/or perfection addict in your makeup (or are prone to any other form of addiction), go forward with some caution, and keep it light and easy. Bits are a lot cheaper than tape used to be, for sure, and you can do a lot with very little- but do it to get the ideas printed, not to create the next great Tubular Bells.

If you can keep the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good, more power to you- you'll have a blast. But if one day you find yourself at the driving range blasting away at a bucket of balls because of the 25th mid-take Blue Screen Of Death for the day, remember these words... (;-)
I see...
That's probably some of the best advice I've gotten on this site. Not only pertaining to this thread but my music in general. Thanks man!
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  #7  
Old 02-25-2013, 12:00 PM
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HerpsMcDerps HerpsMcDerps is offline
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Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinoydrummer View Post
Thanks for this thread as I'm also a recording newbie. I'm now setting up a
really simple room studio to record my drum covers.

I'm planning on a 3 mic setup (kick, snare, overhead condenser).

My question is should I buy a mixer or an audio interface? I'm planning to use
a PC for my recordings.
If you're only using 3 mics, you can get an interface that plugs straight into your computer. I have the M-Audio Fast Track Ultra and it works great. It has phantom power for the condensers, and has more than enough inputs for what you would be using. You can do all of your mixing in a DAW now. I recommend Reaper, as it's just as powerful as the other main DAWs, it's just not as expensive ($60 license).
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  #8  
Old 03-06-2013, 11:48 AM
pinoydrummer pinoydrummer is offline
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Posts: 134
Default Re: Recording for Dummies?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsMcDerps View Post
If you're only using 3 mics, you can get an interface that plugs straight into your computer. I have the M-Audio Fast Track Ultra and it works great. It has phantom power for the condensers, and has more than enough inputs for what you would be using. You can do all of your mixing in a DAW now. I recommend Reaper, as it's just as powerful as the other main DAWs, it's just not as expensive ($60 license).
Thanks for your input. For now I've decided to record my drums with a USB
mic (Blue Microphones Yeti).
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