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  #1  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:01 PM
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Default Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

I'd like to poll everyone here as to the attitude, either for or against, of your parents, in regards to your drumming. I'd also like to know if you come from a long, or short, line of musicians, or not. Obviously this applies to drummers who started out while still under the care of their parents, but feel free to chime in if you started later in life.

My parents got me my first MIJ kit in 1968 when I was 10, so that implies a "for". The previous year I got bongos, but they never really satisfied me. I had restless leg syndrome, I was forever bouncing my right leg. I needed a bass drum. But as I never lost interest playing drums, in the years to follow, my Father definitely regretted helping me get started. I heard him with my own ears express those exact sentiments when I was an adult. He didn't know how huge it would become in my life in 1968, and felt he "lost" me after I got involved with drums. Lol. I would have played regardless, I just would have got my first kit at a later time. But there was no denying the fact that it was inside me and needed to come out. (a nod to a line in John Lee Hooker's "Boogie Chillun")

What I don't understand is...no one in the previous generations of my family, was musical at all, AFAIK. So I don't know where it came from. I did have an older cousin who had, and still owns, a 60's Ludwig black oyster pearl "Ringo" set, but I discovered drums on my own before that. He just helped fuel the fire that was already established.

So, in regards to your parent's attitude... was your drumming encouraged, discouraged, or treated indifferently? Are you the first generation of musicians in your family?
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:11 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

No musical line in my family, but my parents put me in guitar (way too) early. It didn't take.
I badly wanted to start drums in high school but with 4 kids in a very small house, no way that would fly (no e-drums back then). Eventually the passion re-entered my life.... at 40 (I'm 50). Its totally taken over my free time. Better late than never.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:25 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Like Opentune, I wanted to start when I was young, but my mom wouldn't let me. She believed that you've either got it or you don't, so when I proclaimed my interest, she gave me a test to see if I could keep a beat. I failed. So here I am a beginner at the age of 48. (And I can keep time just fine.) Crazy lady.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:28 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

As far as I know, my parents were not musicians, or musical, nor were my grandparents on both sides, although my dad would sit and listen to the Boston Pops simulcast on FM radio and he had an intense appreciation for music, classical mostly, but also county and some pop. Much later in life, post 50, he taught himself some piano since we had an old upright.

My older brother (by 3 years) took up Alto Sax in the 6th grade and went all the way through the public school music program. So hearing about all the cool stuff he did in band, I wanted to follow in his footsteps. I didn't want Sax, as that was his instrument, so I started off on French Horn. Haha. Ya, that lasted maybe a month or so, then I tried guitar. Nope. Not for me either.

It wasn't until I saw my brother's school jazz band play at my school that I saw an incredible 14 year old drummer playing his jazz on a Slingerland black diamond pearl 4 piece kit. I came home that night and told my parents I WANT TO BE A DRUMMER. THAT IS WHAT I WANT TO PLAY!!

After recovering from the horrified feeling they just felt of having drums in the house, they were finally glad I had found something to do, other than play football and called around to several band parents and music shops and agreed to give me drum lessons. My mom even called the junior high music teacher to inquire about good drum teachers in the area and get some advice on how to approach my interest in drumming.

So they fully supported me and my drumming. For Chrismas of 1972, I was 11 and they gave me my first drum set, which was a Japanese Import, a stencil kit. And they supported me all the way thru public school's music programs, came to see me in marching band, etc.

PS, sorry this is long-winded...
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:30 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

around the age of eleven maybe, my mom out of the blue told me that starting next week I was starting drum lessons. i never even asked. i used to play on upside down outmeal cans and things like that. then after i started lessons, they found a used kit for me and bought it. VERY supportive family. I am heading into the studio tonight at seven and already have facebook messages from all of my family wishing me luck, all these years later.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:31 PM
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  #6  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:31 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

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Originally Posted by rdb View Post
Like Opentune, I wanted to start when I was young, but my mom wouldn't let me. She believed that you've either got it or you don't, so when I proclaimed my interest, she gave me a test to see if I could keep a beat. I failed. So here I am a beginner at the age of 48. (And I can keep time just fine.) Crazy lady.
High pressure audition lol. Kind of unfair, no disrespect intended. Do you think if you nailed it she would have done anything differently?
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:37 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

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Originally Posted by The Old Hyde View Post
I am heading into the studio tonight at seven and already have facebook messages from all of my family wishing me luck, all these years later.
Wow that's brilliant! (practicing my English for when I trek on over to the UK in October)

Seriously, to this day, any gig I do is regarded as "you're still doing that?" Even after all these years. Acceptance over things you cannot change is a wonderful thing. As a parent, I think it's wrong to force your children to accommodate what YOU want them to be. Everybody is unique and should be encouraged to be who THEY are, not what the parents WANT them to be.
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  #8  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:39 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

always encouraged by mom
she plays piano, accordion , and sings ...and was always....I mean ALWAYS playing music in the house .
she would always buy me equipment, drive my bands to gigs as a kid , and tell my dad to leave me alone when the noise in the house was getting to him

my old man was a little different
he was a truck driver who worked from 5 AM to 7 PM every night and was not such a huge fan of the noise of me practicing or my bands rehearsing in the basement .
he was an old school, hard working, hard drinking Italian.

that being said...I believe if he was here today he would be proud of the living that I make doing what I love .

to this day mom ....well into her 70s ....is as supportive as she has ever been.....still shows up to gigs when they are close to her .
I actually keep a drum kit set up over at her house because she loves to hear me play drums .....she says it relaxes her ....so when I go over sometimes I mess around on the tubs for a bit
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  #9  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:48 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Other than my grandfather being a fine bag-piper,(awesome) there was little music in my family. I believe I'm the first within a few generations. Arts in general however, were always encouraged, especially by my mother who is also very artistically inclined. My grandmother who passed away recently bought me my first guitars, and I will forever be grateful of that assistance when I was young and couldn't afford anything. Sometimes wish I'd kept at the strings and practiced more, but the call of percussion was just too great after I saw how awesome it could be to jam on drums.

I've noticed that in "musical families" a lot of times, melodic instruments get priority... Drums get a bad wrap sometimes as a simple instrument (that also happens to be loud)...
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:53 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

My mom sang and played piano, and my dad played accordion! My brother also played drums, and when he switched to guitar at a young age, I inherited his drums and started lessons (I had just turned 9.)

Both parents were supportive/tolerant of my playing and practicing, which I did with no encouragement needed. Obviously there were rules about not playing too late, or too early on weekends, but I don't recall ever being told to knock it off or take a break.

I know that both were proud when I began playing with my school bandmates, submitting tapes to Dr. Demento, and later gigging around around town and even earning a living drumming by the time I was 20. Soon after, once they saw that the Al gig was moving forward, they knew I was on the musical path I'd always wanted. They're both long gone now, but I'm sure are still proud from beyond. Someday they can tell me in person.

Bermuda
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  #11  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:53 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Hey Watso, I notice that the hat is in every one of your avi's. Is this something that should be delved deeper into? Do you wear one in real life? (this isn't real life here lol). Does it have to be white? Are you balding? It is a cool hat.
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  #12  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:55 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

When I was 18 and gigging around town, my mom would always be standing right up front by the stage rocking out. She's awesome like that, and has always been a huge supporter of my drumming and music.
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  #13  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

I'll say no. I initially join the school band in 5th grade as a trombone player but i hated it and my friends were drummers so I switch partway through the year and stuck with it ever since. I never had a drum set the entire time growing up. I filled up high school with band classes and continued in college in the percussion ensemble and marching band along with taking private lessons on various percussion instruments and marched 2 years of drum corps.

I continued teaching high school drumlines for about 12 years after graduation and recently stopped doing that last year due to burnout and time commitments from my real job. Finally, at age 35, I purchased a house and now have the room to put the 4.5 octave marimba in my front room and my first drum set in the basement so I can spend my time doing more personal playing and practicing versus teaching others.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

My parents have always been supportive.

Both love music. My father messed around with tenor sax when he was younger, but never seriously. My mother sang in choir in school. My dad's record collection included Basie, Ellington and Kenton. My mom joined a record club as a kid and her favorite was Sketches Of Spain.

My mom insisted I save half the money I earned at my part-time jobs when I was a teen. I hated it, but within a couple years, I saved up enough money to buy my own drums. Suddenly, it didn't seem such a bad idea anymore.

My folks tolerated my drumming for years. I kept the drums upstairs in my bedroom. I practiced an insane amount of time. One summer, I averaged 6 to 8 hours per day in that room, just practicing. I don't know how they put up with that. I think the noise occasionally would fluster my dad a bit. But my mom always liked hearing me play. She always said she found it soothing.

My dad lives a bit farther away now so it's not too often he can see me play out. But my mom lives very close by and she still comes to my gigs!
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:08 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
Hey Watso, I notice that the hat is in every one of your avi's. Is this something that should be delved deeper into? Do you wear one in real life? (this isn't real life here lol). Does it have to be white? Are you balding? It is a cool hat.
I do own a few like that, one is even white with a green strip(I prefer the black with white pin-stripes)... But the original dude-in-hat avatar is just some weird image that I found like 20 years ago and it stayed with me. Something about his expression fits my personality in an odd way. I believe you originally called attention to the hat and Henri ran with it for a while while you were away. There was a whole fish abuse theme for a while that you missed.

In short, I've never been one to dissuade a silly theme. These days, if you see a white brim hat next to a post, you can almost assume the content of the post will be asinine.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:08 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

I started playing around 2-3 years go, around 15 years old, I don't know why I started either really. I just remember being 11 and seeing people like Lombardo and Bostaph tearing up these huge monster kits, and I was like, "I wanna do that!"

I asked my mother about learning drums but she said that we couldn't afford them or have them due to neighbors, but when I can I can get a set, she got in touch with the school I was at and got me drum lessons, however I was naive and expected to learn to play fast thrash drumming of the bat, not doing stuff like how to hold a stick and a simple roll and became disheartened about learning to drum. However looking back I wish I kept with the lessons because I know I would be a much better 4 years ago then I am today. When I stopped my mum encouraged me to go back and keep taking lessons and said we'll get you a kit soon, I had made up my mind and stopped.

A few years later I wanted to start again, however this time not only could we not afford a kit but we had just moved and couldn't afford lessons. I saved up every bit of money I could though, and i bought a kit, which I was then told I couldn't play, I discovered you can get drum mute pads for them and told my mum, and she went and bought me some.

I haven't stopped drumming since, and I'm now in a band, my mum has been very supportive about my entire drumming life and band life, she doesn't like it when I'm sat downstairs and I just start tapping on stuff though haha.

As for a line of musicians, as far as I'm aware I was the only musical member of my family instrument wise till I started drumming (except a distant uncle I have never heard of who was a drummer). my brothers then took up the guitar a couple years after I took up drums, i wonder if I may have influenced them at all.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:10 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Its interesting the number of people who's moms found their kids drumming as "soothing".
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:11 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

I had it weird. My mom was totally supportive, and so not supportive all at the same time.

I grew up super poor for many years, single child of a single mom. Until around Jr. High school, when my mom went back to school and got her Masters and then got a good job. Then we graduated to middle class. So it was my mom who found a drum teacher and told me I was taking drum lessons, because I kept going around the house playing the intro to Rush's Cignus X-1 on everything.

She bought me my 1st kit, she paid for me to go to PIT. So I was beyond lucky in that regard.

But then after PIT graduation, it got weird. She couldn't understand why I couldn't just open up the paper, find a job listing, and go get a regular 40-hour a week job drumming, like any "regular" career. She never came to my gigs (save 1). There was never any support for my bands. She hounded me to go to college and get a regular degree. Even after I did that (because going to school during the day meant I was free to gig at night), no matter how much record company interest we got, no matter that we got some radio play, no matter how much was going right, there was always that disappointed attitude of "are you still in bands?"

So, I dunno. I never got why she'd sent me to PIT and then not support using that experience.

But that said, I miss her dearly now that she's gone.

I didn't find out until after she died that the guy who knocked her up with me was a drummer. So I suppose that was where some of the weirdness came from; cause he's a *bleeping* loser scum bag.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:19 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Just about everyone in my family has sang in a chior or played an instrament at one point or another. Growing up my mom always had her instraments around for us to play with. Guitar, violin, trumpit and (electric) piano. My father won't let me keep a real kit set up at home due to the noise/space, but an e-kit is fine. My sister plays sax and clarie as well.

My friends parents are really cool though. We practice twice a week in their garage and they even let us store equiptment there.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:29 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Wow Ian interesting story. Anyone who can talk about their mother and use the term "knocked her up with me" has both my respect and sympathy lol.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:42 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

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Wow Ian interesting story. Anyone who can talk about their mother and use the term "knocked her up with me" has both my respect and sympathy lol.
Well, it was the end of the 60's in San Francisco. LOL....

Which is why I always have a soft spot for Grace Slick and the Jefferson Airplane. But for some odd reason, not for the Grateful Dead. haha.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:47 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

WOW, I think many of us could write a book on our own experience/history with this one, and I know for me, this stirs the old emotional pot a bit. None the less, looking back, I have to say to myself, just be glad you were blessed with the talent
you were given. Looking back my 82yo mom says she wishes she would have gotten me drums sooner in my life, real drums. It wasn’t till I got my first ‘real’ job that a drummer friend took me and my tax return to get me my first kit.
From a family of 6, all but 2 played several instruments, and mom even taught piano at the house. So when I failed at learning that, It was back outside to play, no Xbox in those days. Needless to say, any drumming ability went unnoticed through the years
that my ‘not so good’ behavior became the only thing noticed. But three months after getting drums, I became the drummer for my friends band, and he moved to vocals, as I put all those ‘air drumming’ lessons into reality. Maybe the lessons I had to learn in life at that time took precedence to becoming a drummer..? IDK

DRUMeatDRUM, I can relate!
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

I recently started playing about 3 years ago but hey, in my mid 40s, I'm still lucky have my folks aruond and kicking. And they actually do ask me all the time how the drumming is going. But as a lad, I had a brother played guitar and smoked weed in the 70s, but AM radio was on constantly. Listen to music 24/7. I can name year and month of any top 40 hit. Weird.

Present, my fiancee is a total talent. Best singer I have ever known. Maybe Ella was better.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:51 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Heres my story...

My stepfather hated my drumming because I was a better drummer than he has ever been, and of course, my mother just thought it was a whole bunch of banging...until they saw me play at one of my shows. Now my mother is trying to push me to become a better drummer, and my stepfather is long gone(divorce), So, I guess moral of the story:It all works out in the end! lol
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:53 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

My parents weren't exactly musical but they were arty and they encouraged us to follow any arty inclination. My sisters and I are all in our 60s now. One is a poet and plays clarinet. The other paints and and sings in a choir. I took to dance which my mother always supported, she came to everything I ever appeared in on stage right up to the end of her life.

All of which - looking back - is quite unusual I think for a fairly poor, working class, post-war family.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:58 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

My family is very musical. Almost everybody learned to play an instrument and/or sing growing up.

They love the fact that I have such an exciting "hobby" to compliment my engineering degree and yearly salary. My parents come to all the gigs they can and they bring friends and dance. Good times.

In my ideal world where I would be drumming full time, they would not support that decision. They think that music can't pay the bills and would ruin my family life. That's what they told me in high school and in college when I was planning a music career. Here I am now, again, thinking about music. I wonder what they'll say now.. If I ever took the plunge, I think they would be supportive because they feel obligated as parents, but they'll fight tooth and nail until that happens.
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:48 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

The only ones in my family who played a musical instrument were me and two of my cousins who played piano and guitar.An aunt I had ,who was the mother of my cousin that played piano, encouraged me to play drums,and actually bought me my first Rascals album.

I was never encouraged to play drums by my parents,in fact my dad said that drums weren't a musical instrument.That didn't deter me,and it also meant that I would have to work to pay for everything.

It also meant limited practice time,which is why I was never as good as I could have been.But....better something than nothing.

Steve B
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:59 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

There are some great and interesting stories here.

To say my parents were supportive would be an understatement. Both have passed away but their influence will remain with me forever.

My Dad was a drummer who played in local big bands in the 40's & 50's and began playing in small wedding bands thereafter until the family / work life became to demanding in time and then he packed all his stuff away.

In 1976 he set up his drums for me at my asking (he was more excited than I was to do so) and after about 2 weeks of noodling, he signed me up for private lessons with a teacher up the street.

Throughout his life he absolutely loved that I was more than passionate about music and drumming and taught me more about jazz history than any other source. I still have a few pieces of his set - in fact, I just had his snare drum refurbished to a very played condition. His hi hat cymbals and bass drum remain as they were when he gave them to me in 1976. They are now tucked away.

My mom was more than supportive by making sure I was always allowed to practice in the house when I was home after school and on weekends without issues. This was a huge contribution to my production.

My Dad's brother played sax in the army during Korea and was on the road a while with some big bands afterwards. He packed it all away back in the around 1959 and didn't open his case until around 1979 when he decided he wanted to get a pickup jazz band which included me being their drummer. My Aunt (his wife) sang.

My parents didn't have much money so other than the gear my Dad gave me, I didn't get much help other than sticks, brushes, the occasional head and most importantly the money for my lessons. Any gear that came after that I had to earn the money delivering newspapers, mowing, shoveling, sweeping neighbor's garages, etc. I was so glad when I turned 16 to work my $3.05/per hour job which I saved enough money to buy good gear.

I also have/had other family members who played various instruments and sang as well (piano, drums, violin, vocalists, etc…)

My folks were the best and I have nothing but great memories which I cherish.

Sorry this is probably more than you wanted/needed to know or asked for.

Here's some cool old pics of my Dad and other family members playing....

The big band with a cousin playing guitar (sitting next to my Dad) and uncle playing sax (3rd one in from left).
Attachment 54417

The Ludwig's I still have (sans the two toms) with my cousin.
Attachment 54416

A jam session he played in Germany.
Attachment 54418

Last edited by dmacc; 06-21-2014 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:09 PM
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Naigewron Naigewron is online now
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

My parents were very supportive about my drumming (and my guitar playing, piano lessons and my marching band). I sort of wish they'd forced me to be more structured about drumming when I started out, but on the other hand I'm not sure I would have stuck with it if it was "forced" on me.

When I first got my "real" kit, it was set up in the hallway outside my parents' and sister's bedrooms, and only a few meters away from my grandparents' part of the house. I have absolutely no idea how they possibly managed to live with me slamming my kit all day up there. My parents "had to" be supportive, I guess, but I can't even remember my sister ever complaining.

I'm the only musician in my family. There are a couple of family members (dad and a couple of uncles) who can strum a guitar, and my sister took piano lessons for a couple of years, but never showed any real interest or stuck with it. I have no idea where my interest in music came from, or what made me want to play drums.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:28 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

Great family story dmacc!

My folks supported my drumming although there were not any musicians in my family both my parents loved listening to music. My dad loved jazz and mom loved classical and anything Tom Jones! Strangely, it was my step dad who bought me my first set of drums. What is strange about it is he loathed musicians saying they were all hippie pot smoking flakes. He always went on and on how nothing good would come out of me being a musician....but he bought me the kit anyway and tolerated me "playing" in my room to records for hours on end. He turned out to be a mean SOB and my mom divorced him but I at least have to thank him for my first set of drums!

Last edited by KnuckleBuster; 01-31-2013 at 10:29 PM. Reason: completed sentence
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:35 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

Mum was an author and a big fan of the arts generally, including music. Still, in hindsight I think she wished I was focused more on writing than drumming. Trouble is, our talents and preferences are not always in the same sphere.

Dad bought me a kit after a long period of intense lobbying and kindly tolerated my practising, but he disliked my music and drumming and his feedback tended to be "Do you call that noise music?".

So I'm the only "musician" in the family ;-) My sister dabbled in piano and clarinet but ended up just dating jazz musicians. That was great for me because she left a piano and clarinet in the home for me to play around with, and I got to see some fabulous jazz gigs.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:41 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

Great story dmacc. Exactly what I was looking for. Among other things, it kind of defines the best way a parent can support their kids. Heck you were probably a dream come true to your parents, nothing bonds a family like music can. I didn't experience that coming up, and it really warms my heart to hear how good it can be.
BTW your Dad and his brother...you can really see the family resemblance, your family has good genes. I envy you man.

Grea, nothing like the old mans comments to brighten your day, right? Lobbying. Lol. You pick the best words.

So far the general consensus I'm getting here is that more responders were supported than not.

Opentune, re: the soothing thing... It's a parental safety thing, you know exactly where your kid is, and you know that they're safe and happy.

Last edited by larryace; 01-31-2013 at 10:53 PM.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:44 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

As far as my parents were concerned, my mother was against my getting a kit whilst my father was all for it. Oddly enough, she got me my first set, when I was 15. It was a no-name children's kit that her friend was throwing out. It lasted roughly 3 months before my father allowed me to look for a used kit online. So I guess you could say in the end both my parents were all for it.
As for musicians in the family, my great uncle is a bassist and vocalist, and another great uncle is a drummer. Both of these men are in their 50s to 60s, and have been musicians their entire life.
But other than those two, my brother and I are the only other musicians in the family.

Cheers! :)
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

I'm 48 yrs old and my mom still rolls her eyes at the mention of my drumming...but I think deep down she was (during my teens) and still is glad I'm was doing something constructive. BTW, my wife is so cool w/the drumming she let me build this...

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...03#post1094003
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:50 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

I feel very lucky having read some of the non-supportive experiences here.

My parents have been (and continue to be) incredibly supportive of my music. Some of it might come from an obligation of sorts.

My family are all musical to lesser or greater degrees. All of my grandparents sing (and my grandfather that passed away a year ago was a very good singer indeed) and most play other instruments. My Mother was a cellist and pianist, my Dad was a trombonist and guitarist as well as singing. Neither play much any more but it's still there. Then my brother came along in 1986 and a couple of years later was discovered to be severely autistic. On the advice of a psychologist, they switched him on to the piano and he was discovered to have a vivacious talent - to say he was ten years ahead of his age on the instrument would be understating it. He also took up the French horn and was found to have a similar talent.

So naturally, I took up the piano for a few years and I sang. I gave up the piano but still sang in choirs and had a lot of serious singing lessons. Then when I got to fourteen out of nowhere I decided that I wanted to play the drums. Call it on a whim, really. A few weeks later, my parents had found me a good local teacher and started paying for lessons. Then I bought my own kit and really got the bug. They put up with the noise but it was no noisier than my brother playing the French horn and I suppose there was an egalitarian notion that if he could make noise, I could likewise make noise. They also bought me an electronic kit (a hint?!) a couple of years later that I still have - although it's not used hugely at the moment.

I cannot thank them enough. They still put up with noise in the house (I had to move back in with them through a variety of circumstances) but I make a point of only playing when they're not in. I think it's only fair!
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:02 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

Dad was gigging drummer for many years, so my drumming was actively encouraged.

Just wish I paid a hell of a lot more attention to what he was saying when I was younger......I have no doubt I'd be better for it today if I did.
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:12 PM
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Default Re: Your parent's attitude towards your drumming

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryz View Post
I can name year and month of any top 40 hit. Weird.
impressive. OK ...how about 'Drift Away' by Dobie Gray? lol
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:15 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

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A jam session he played in Germany.
Attachment 54418
Great background. Now hey...is THAT the first power tom, pre - 80's? cool.
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

My parents bought me drums and put up with me bashing away until I learned to play them, so I have to say they were supportive. One of my grandmothers could play piano, but other than that, I am the first musician in my family that I know of. My nineteen-year-old son plays bass and some keyboards. One of my two brothers has sung in a couple of local musicals.

Peace and goodwill.
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Old 02-01-2013, 12:09 AM
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Default Re: Your parents' attitude towards your drumming

My parents were supportive and put up with all the noise that came with it for many years. While in High School we would have jams in the back yard on almost a weekly basis. Really annoyed the neighbors. LOL I played until I entered the military and then took the next 40 years off. Just now have begun to revisit the drums and music. Could have something to do with the wife being a musician too.
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