View Single Post
  #200  
Old 05-12-2008, 04:01 AM
Trip McNealy's Avatar
Trip McNealy Trip McNealy is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 698
Default Re: Pat Petrillo here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ripechancewoods View Post
Hi Pat!! It's so great to be able to talk to you! I have been using your book and DVD for the past 4 months or so.. and it has helped me improve my drumming more than anything else :) If I had the chance I would go to one of your clinics, but I live in New Zealand -When are you coming here?!!

Anyway, a question about double strokes: you mention in the book that you don't 'pull' the second stroke, but the way my teacher has taught me is to use a 'push-pull' technique i.e. using the fingers to pull the stick towards the palm to create the second stroke. However I find that this way of doing doubles really strains the tendons on the back of my hand. So could you please explain to me in more detail how to do a proper double stroke roll? Thanks.

Btw I have never seen a drummer who can groove like you do on the DVD.. the musical performances are awesome! You're the best :)

Reuven
I used to be the same way!!

Now that I take lessons with Pat, my technique has taken a complete 180. My hands and forearms no longer hurt and I have more control of the stick.

I'll let Pat answer with his 'expertise' but in learning how to play rudiments and get that "FLOW" goin with the hands, you don't use any fingers or force a second note with your hands.. Think of dribbling a basketball. You use your hands and forearms to create that "undulating" motion.. Almost like a wave.

Now put the sticks in your hands, play on the pad, and keep that dribbling motion going. The natural rebound of the stick will create the upstroke. Now keep your hands down for a split second and that second bounce will come by itself! Sorry if my explanation isn't clear, certainly in person it would make sense! :-)
__________________
I've been drumming for 35 years. I'm 34 years old.
Reply With Quote