Thread: Dog training
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Old 07-16-2007, 11:39 AM
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ludwigvondrumcrazy ludwigvondrumcrazy is offline
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Default Re: Dog training

Quote:
Originally Posted by jangus View Post
Problem is, we have three cats and he naturally is interested in them. We used to have a female german shorthair and she would "play" with the cats, albeit a little roughly. This dog doesn't play like her, he stares and stalks and points like he was hunting a bird, usually. Is there a way to make a dog like this friendly with the cats, or at least just ignore them? It doesn't seem like the conventional methods of saying "no" or rewarding him for good things is getting the point across.
Dogbreath can probably help you more than I can and without knowing the Dog & Cats it's hard to answer your question.
The main thing, to me, is how do the Cats interact with the Dog? If they give him something to "play" off of then he will tend to instinctively want to "play."

If the Cats will cooperate, if it were me, I would take the time to repeatedly put them in the situation where he wants to stalk them and work from there. Eventually he should realize that the "game" isn't fun anymore and give up. If the Cats don't cooperate then it's a matter of being persistant across the board, meaning every family member has to do their part so he doesn't figure out that "Dad" won't let me get away with it but "Mom" etc. will......................

Training Dogs is a lot like learning how to play the Drums, it does take some time & effort with the main thing being that you have to be proactive, as opposed to reactive. That's why I would try to put them in the situation that is causing the problem instead of dealing with it when he puts you in "it."

It's been my experience that if a person has very little patience then they have very little sucess in training a Dog. You have to remain consistant & persistant and take the time to get the Dog to understand what you are trying to get him or her to do. Hit & miss usually doesn't cut it.....................

I have yet to meet a Dog that I couldn't get to do what I wanted it to, although that Bassett Hound, Pepper, that I mentioned in my previous post gave me a run for my money. She was too darn smart, dumb Dogs are usually push overs.....................

EDIT: Let me clarify my last statement, the one about smart or dumb. Each Dog has it's own personality so it's important to get to know where they are coming from in order to get them to go where you want them to, in Pepper's case she was not only smart, but stubborn. I have had extremely smart Dogs that literally "got" what I was saying to them without hardly any effort at all so it really does deal with "personality." Take the time to get to know them, really know them, after all, when you think about it, it's all about them....................

LVDC
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Last edited by ludwigvondrumcrazy; 07-16-2007 at 11:57 AM.
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