Thread: Neil Peart
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Old 09-21-2006, 10:05 AM
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Default Re: Neil Peart

Quote:
Originally Posted by rendezvous_drummer
Yea man, have you seen his dvd's? He talks about drums while walking through forests. Some of his lyrics though make no sense at all. For example, in "Spirit of the Radio", when the song is near the end, Geddy Lee sings "Echos of the sound of salesmen, of salesmen, OHHHHHHHH SALESMEN!". Hilarious part but odd. Great lyricist none the less.
I don't mean to speak down to you here but you do realize that the preceding part of this "The words of the prophets were written on the studio walls" was a spin off of Simon and Garfunkel's Sound of Silence Lyric, "The words of the prophets were written on the subway walls".
Quote:
Originally Posted by rendezvous_drummer
Some of his lyrics though make no sense at all. For example, in "Spirit of the Radio", when the song is near the end, Geddy Lee sings "Echos of the sound of salesmen, of salesmen, OHHHHHHHH SALESMEN!". Hilarious part but odd.
And, I believe, this line refers to the growing commercialism of music (which would explode in the 1980s) at the time in which Rush wasn't cranking out hit song after hit song. As Frank Zappa put it in his book, "and turn up the handclaps....."

Rush and other bands like Genesis were really having to start to reidentify and reinvent themselves. "The Spirit of Radio" is basically a reminder of where radio came from and what made it great. There was a time when the record companies didn't control everything (like the playlists and radio station conglomerates) for the sake of selling commercial slots for advertising (back to Frank here, ..."to buy all the worthless crap people want to sell us")

This song was a real social commentary on where free radio was headed, for better for worse, in the not too distant future..

"One likes to believe in the freedom of music but glitter prizes and endless compromises challenge the illusion of integrity....."

Do you see the relevance in these words?

I don't know that I even really listen to Rush much anymore, but they did contribute alot and many bands from the 1990s list them as a major influence. And at least Neil, as a lyricist, made people rethink the whole "dumb drummer" attitude. I don't know that Neil would make my top ten list, but he still has contributed quite a bit. And you have to respect a band who didn't sell out for bigger profits in the growing face of top 40 radio. I can think of one band that did and doesn't even tour anymore. Rush is probably still as popular as ever with music fans and they did this doing it their way.


Mike

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