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-   -   Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?) (http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60146)

Number Two 03-17-2010 10:42 PM

Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
So, if I was to sing the note of E, then sing a D, that is a difference in pitch. However, if I sing a D while the necessary oral muscles provide that I'm phoenetically saying, "Eeeeeh," then repeat the same note in a way that I'm phoenetically saying, "Oooooooooh," what do you call the quality/trait of the sound that I've changed?

MikeM 03-17-2010 10:51 PM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
I think it's called timbre.

What really confuses me is when you look into the mirror you see yourself backwards, but does music get backwards when similarly reflected off a wall? :D

toddy 03-18-2010 01:06 AM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeM (Post 677358)
I think it's called timbre.

What really confuses me is when you look into the mirror you see yourself backwards, but does music get backwards when similarly reflected off a wall? :D

LOL! you know, i think it should, but sadly :(

yes its the timbre. it can be applied to many different instruments. if you feel like learning more about this stuff then i would recommend getting the AB guide to music theory (pink book) or something similar. there is also a music theory for dummies book which has some good charts and explanations! good luck.

BassDriver 03-19-2010 09:22 AM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
Timbre is how we can differentiate between a saxophone and a trumpet even if they are playing the same musical note...

...the D is the same D on a sax or trumpet, the fundamental tone is what we tune for (the lowest pitch in a set of tones) and the rest of the sound is the set of overtones, and the waveform shape.

toddy 03-19-2010 09:59 AM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
hmm that's true actually, timbre is what bassdriver said, not what i said, LOL.

http://voicelessonstogo.com/blog/vocal-timbre

in retrospect i think you're just talking about the vowel sounds. sorry, i posted my previous answer while i was a little tired.. :-P

but the books i mentioned are still good.. i should re-read them again.. haha!

Pollyanna 03-19-2010 10:54 AM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
Nice description, BD. Unless the execution is tightly controlled you'd expect a different relationship between attack and sustain of the note.

Number Two 03-26-2010 09:12 PM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
If it is timbre, then I guess the reason that I didn't consider it is that I thought that it was too vague a term; that maybe this had its own more specific word. If it helps to confirm, I'll give another example. Say, if you pluck one string on a guitar that makes an exact pitch, perfectly tuned, then you pluck a thicker or thinner string on the same guitar, holding it down on the appropriate fret, which makes the same pitch (same octave, of course), again perfectly tuned. Still, they don't sound exactly the same.

Thanks a lot for the first five replies, guys. :D

dcrigger 03-27-2010 01:56 AM

Re: Question About Musical Term (Or Lack Thereof?)
 
It's still timbre.

Not so much a vague term, as a broad one. For individual notes like that, aren't the main properties for comparison - pitch, amplitude (volume), timbre and duration?

David


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