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-   -   Drummer's Brains are Different (http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=35609)

GetAgrippa 02-14-2008 04:23 PM

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2003 Nov;999:131-9. Links
Specialization of the specialized: electrophysiological investigations in professional musicians.Münte TF, Nager W, Beiss T, Schroeder C, Altenmüller E.

Several event-related brain potential (ERP) studies examining the processing of auditory stimuli by professional musicians compared with non-musicians are reviewed. In the first study, musicians (string players) and non-musicians attended to one of two streams of auditory stimuli characterized by a specific pitch. Musicians showed a prolonged ERP attention effect, the late portion of which was more frontally distributed than was that of the non-musicians. In the second study, we investigated auditory spatial processing in conductors, pianists, and nonmusicians. Only the conductors showed behavioral selectivity of sound sources located in the peripheral auditory space. In addition, this group showed a negative/positive mismatch response for deviant stimuli occurring outside the focus of spatial attention. Finally, a group of drummers was compared to woodwind players and nonmusicians in a passive listening task. A real continuous drum sequence was manipulated so that some beats were anticipated by 80 ms. The drummers showed a mismatch response not only for the anticipated beats but also for the subsequent beats, suggesting a more complex representation of the temporal aspects stimulus sequence in this subject group. Together, these studies suggest qualitative differences of the neural correlates of auditory processing between musicians and non-musicians. Moreover, these differences appear to be shaped by the specific training of a musician.

Here is another abstract I thought interesting.
Perception. 2007;36(6):888-97.Links
Hearing gestures, seeing music: vision influences perceived tone duration.Schutz M, Lipscomb S.
Percussionists inadvertently use visual information to strategically manipulate audience perception of note duration. Videos of long (L) and short (S) notes performed by a world-renowned percussionist were separated into visual (Lv, Sv) and auditory (La, Sa) components. Visual components contained only the gesture used to perform the note, auditory components the acoustic note itself. Audio and visual components were then crossed to create realistic musical stimuli. Participants were informed of the mismatch, and asked to rate note duration of these audio-visual pairs based on sound alone. Ratings varied based on visual (Lv versus Sv), but not auditory (La versus Sa) components. Therefore while longer gestures do not make longer notes, longer gestures make longer sounding notes through the integration of sensory information. This finding contradicts previous research showing that audition dominates temporal tasks such as duration judgment.

As we age we start to show signs of memory and reflex changes in our thirties. By the time you are in your 50's we really take a hit. What is amazing is look at all the agile and speedy drummers who are older than 50 many in their 70's, and they still "got it". Playing a muscial instrument has been demonstrated to be beneficial in delaying Alzheimer's too. I think psychologically drumming has its advantages for stress relief. Just think drumming is challenging, fun, and provides health benefits. Dang sign me up!!! I wonder if I can get some benefit for being a drummer for my health insurance. Hee, hee. I would be nice-like being a non-smoker.

Smashin Jack 02-14-2008 05:47 PM

Re: Drummer's Brains are Different
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GetAgrippa (Post 409757)
As we age we start to show signs of memory and reflex changes in our thirties. By the time you are in your 50's we really take a hit. What is amazing is look at all the agile and speedy drummers who are older than 50 many in their 70's, and they still "got it". Playing a muscial instrument has been demonstrated to be beneficial in delaying Alzheimer's too. I think psychologically drumming has its advantages for stress relief. Just think drumming is challenging, fun, and provides health benefits. Dang sign me up!!! I wonder if I can get some benefit for being a drummer for my health insurance. Hee, hee. I would be nice-like being a non-smoker.

I never noticed any memory or reflex changes in my thirties, but my wrists get sore easier in my forties. Hmmm. Interesting findings...

GetAgrippa 02-14-2008 06:44 PM

Re: Drummer's Brains are Different
 
Yep, You won't actually notice a difference but it is measureable in your thirties. I am in my fifities I haven't noticed any difference either except pain from arthritis. Even though cognitive functions decrease with age it apparently makes little real difference as most Nobel laureates are in their forties when they perform their major contributions and many of them are active in their eighties. I guess it is more of a use it or lose it phenomenon. I thought it interesting that researchers were interested in such phenomena as music related neurophysiology. I have always thought drummers were of a different ilk.

DestinationDrumming 02-17-2008 10:20 AM

Re: Drummer's Brains are Different
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GetAgrippa (Post 409800)
Even though cognitive functions decrease with age it apparently makes little real difference

You are right that peoples aptitude (ability to learn new things) reduces with age. The specifics are that aptitude stays pretty stable after we reach our early 20's. Until then the brains grey matter is developing and is not fully formed yet. When we get to our mid-fifties (sorry! ;o)) there is a reduction but it's not a significant one. Another way to view this is that by the time we get to our mid-fifties we have lots of experience and, hopefully, more patience to draw upon and this helps us to compensate for our slight reduction in aptitude. Plus, from a personality perspective, we get more conventional as we get older so the desire for searching out new things is less as we get older. We tend to prefer the tried and tested.

We are a clever lot on DW, seems to fly in the face of the drummer stereotype i.e. What did the drummer get on their IQ test......drool! Sort of thing.

Vinnysimmo 02-17-2008 07:30 PM

Re: Drummer's Brains are Different
 
Course our brains are different.


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