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defunkt 07-15-2007 07:09 AM

Dog training
 
Hey guys I'm getting a puppy soon and I was just wondering what the best method for toilet training your dog has been? It's a Fox Terrier and is about 3 months old.
Help please.

harryconway 07-15-2007 07:17 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Well, DB happens to be a professional dog trainer, so he would know if anyone does. I was never able to train any of my dogs to do anything but "drink" out of the toilet bowl. And that seemed to come natural to them. Best I could ever get 'em to do was go outside.

larlev 07-15-2007 07:27 AM

Re: Dog training
 
crate training.................

defunkt 07-15-2007 08:13 AM

Re: Dog training
 
crate training you say?

ludwigvondrumcrazy 07-15-2007 10:48 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by larlev (Post 335643)
crate training.................

I've had something like over 100 Dogs in my life at that's the method that has worked best for me................

Just keep in mind that Puppies don't have a whole heck of a lot of bladder control so when they get real excited or just get up from a "nap" will be the time to take them outside. Once they get used to going outside that's where they will expect to do their business and will count on you to make that happen, just pay attention and you will learn "the signs" so will know when to take them where they need to go. Expect a few accidents since they really don't know any better until they are taught and have some "experience" under their collar.....................

Good Luck!!
LVDC

Jeff Almeyda 07-15-2007 01:51 PM

Re: Dog training
 
Just PM Dogbreath. He trains assistance animals for the handicapped. I can't imagine a better source for good info, plus he's a drummer!

bighaibigdrums 07-15-2007 03:34 PM

Re: Dog training
 
Crate training. Dogs wont pee were they sleep.

ludwigvondrumcrazy 07-15-2007 11:29 PM

Re: Dog training
 
I forgot to mention the most important thing, positive reinforcement, you know, praise / reward for doing a "good job." I've also found that when praising or scolding it's important to be consistant in all aspects of this, tone, manner etc., which reduces what the youngster has to figure out so they can focus on the lesson(s) you want them to learn. Be consistant....................

LVDC

millerdakiller 07-16-2007 05:31 AM

Re: Dog training
 
yell at it. loudly. make sure your dog knows whos boss. and make sure it knows when it does something that you don't like. This may seem mean, but its better then hitting them. and its saved my dogs life a few times(crossing the street, not housebreaking. but it definately helps in housebreaking.) Sometimes you do need to hit the dog. BUT PLEASE NOTE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HITTING AND INJURING THE DOG. if you do need to hit the dog, do it hard enough that he'll know you mean buissness, but not so hard that you hurt him. good luck

jangus 07-16-2007 05:42 AM

Re: Dog training
 
This is off topic but also on topic some I'm gonna go ahead and ask it.

We recently got a male german shorthair pointer that's estimated to be 2 years old and we don't think he's trained to hunt (or much else other than the basics) and he is housebroken for the most part (he knows what he's supposed to do, it just comes down to us letting him out). He will not be training him to hunt, like they are usually used for.

Problem is, we have three cats and he naturally is interested in them. We used to have a female german shorthair and she would "play" with the cats, albeit a little roughly. This dog doesn't play like her, he stares and stalks and points like he was hunting a bird, usually. Is there a way to make a dog like this friendly with the cats, or at least just ignore them? It doesn't seem like the conventional methods of saying "no" or rewarding him for good things is getting the point across.

T.Underhill 07-16-2007 06:26 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by millerdakiller (Post 335941)
yell at it. loudly. make sure your dog knows whos boss. and make sure it knows when it does something that you don't like. This may seem mean, but its better then hitting them. and its saved my dogs life a few times(crossing the street, not housebreaking. but it definately helps in housebreaking.) Sometimes you do need to hit the dog. BUT PLEASE NOTE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HITTING AND INJURING THE DOG. if you do need to hit the dog, do it hard enough that he'll know you mean buissness, but not so hard that you hurt him. good luck

Do not listen to this man.

ludwigvondrumcrazy 07-16-2007 11:05 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by T.Underhill (Post 335962)
Do not listen to this man.

I agree and hope that the advice was given in jest....................

It's all about tone, not volume, when training and hitting does nothing but tend to make a dog afraid of you, which can make it hard to get them to come to you when you want. Dogs have the ability to learn how you feel just by your tone / delivery and even if they know they have done something wrong will still come when called if they don't fear getting "whacked!"

A fellow I knew back in the 70's, an old Southern "transplant" who lived not far from me and that sold me one of my Bloodhounds had 52 of this breed when we got "Sam" from him. He bred, trained and sold them to Law Enforcement Agencies all over the Country. I got to know him well and helped him train his dogs, which helped me learn to train mine, and while he always liked ask people "You see that point on top of their (Hounds) heads? That's a knowledge knot," meaning they were so stubborn that you had to hit them on top of the head to teach them anything, I never seen him hit a one.

He always "reasoned" with them.............

Now I had a Bassett Hound that tempted me, on occasion, to give her a little "knowledge," if you know what I mean. At times the line between who was training who was a little blurred but "we" eventually got the "Alpha" dog role squared away......

LVDC

ludwigvondrumcrazy 07-16-2007 11:39 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jangus (Post 335945)
Problem is, we have three cats and he naturally is interested in them. We used to have a female german shorthair and she would "play" with the cats, albeit a little roughly. This dog doesn't play like her, he stares and stalks and points like he was hunting a bird, usually. Is there a way to make a dog like this friendly with the cats, or at least just ignore them? It doesn't seem like the conventional methods of saying "no" or rewarding him for good things is getting the point across.

Dogbreath can probably help you more than I can and without knowing the Dog & Cats it's hard to answer your question.
The main thing, to me, is how do the Cats interact with the Dog? If they give him something to "play" off of then he will tend to instinctively want to "play."

If the Cats will cooperate, if it were me, I would take the time to repeatedly put them in the situation where he wants to stalk them and work from there. Eventually he should realize that the "game" isn't fun anymore and give up. If the Cats don't cooperate then it's a matter of being persistant across the board, meaning every family member has to do their part so he doesn't figure out that "Dad" won't let me get away with it but "Mom" etc. will......................

Training Dogs is a lot like learning how to play the Drums, it does take some time & effort with the main thing being that you have to be proactive, as opposed to reactive. That's why I would try to put them in the situation that is causing the problem instead of dealing with it when he puts you in "it."

It's been my experience that if a person has very little patience then they have very little sucess in training a Dog. You have to remain consistant & persistant and take the time to get the Dog to understand what you are trying to get him or her to do. Hit & miss usually doesn't cut it.....................

I have yet to meet a Dog that I couldn't get to do what I wanted it to, although that Bassett Hound, Pepper, that I mentioned in my previous post gave me a run for my money. She was too darn smart, dumb Dogs are usually push overs.....................

EDIT: Let me clarify my last statement, the one about smart or dumb. Each Dog has it's own personality so it's important to get to know where they are coming from in order to get them to go where you want them to, in Pepper's case she was not only smart, but stubborn. I have had extremely smart Dogs that literally "got" what I was saying to them without hardly any effort at all so it really does deal with "personality." Take the time to get to know them, really know them, after all, when you think about it, it's all about them....................

LVDC

katman 07-16-2007 03:08 PM

Re: Dog training
 
I've always been surrounded by animals and grew up with many dogs, but I've never tried to teach them complicated tricks and actions. Just the basic stuff like not peeing in the house, not begging (too much) for food, not savaging my house guests. And I find the most important thing is to build a bond with your dog. If you spend enough time with him/her, you'll get to know her moods and signs of iminent catastrophe and she will get to know your tone of voice very well. Eventually your tone of voice will be enough to discourage her from doing what she shouldn't as well as knowing when you're happy with her. And I think it's far more important that she gets to know your "happy" voice, as this will make her trust you completely. Bottom line - get to know her well and get her to know you well. It's the most rewarding thing in the world.

rendezvous_drummer 07-16-2007 08:19 PM

Re: Dog training
 
This sounds like a job for Spiderman........err I mean Dog Breath.

DogBreath 07-17-2007 01:25 AM

Re: Dog training
 
As I always say, the most important aspect of dog training is the relationship between the owner and the dog. Every dog has three questions that need to be answered:
1. Who is my boss?,
2. What is my job?, and
3. What's in it for me?

The sad thing is there are many ways to answer those questions so many people will tell you "I've always done it this way and it works just fine." For instance, you can answer those questions in a dog's mind with:
1. I'm your boss because I'm the biggest, meanest guy in the house
2. Your job is to never let me catch you doing anything that makes me angry, and
3. What's in it for you is I'll stop hitting you once you figure all of this out.

Yes, that works. I prefer the following answers:
1. I am your boss because I am smart and strong and a mighty hunter.
2. Your job is to do whatever task I give you, or to follow the established rules of the house when I leave you unsupervised, once I have taken the time to train you in a way that you understand.
3. Your paycheck is plenty of play and exercise, a feeling of security, a belly full of high quality food, and a return of the unconditional love that you give me.

For potty training a puppy, your best friends are a crate and a leash. Until my pups are house-broken, they are either in their crates or on a leash, literally 24 hours a day. The dog sleeps in the crate at night, and first thing in the morning open the crate, attach the leash, and give her permission to come out. Walk her outside on leash to the exact spot where you want her to relieve herself, and when she's done walk her back into the house and into her crate. If you're going to leave her out of her crate, keep her with you and on a leash. Take her out to the same place to relieve herself after she eats or drinks, after playtime, when she wakes up from a nap, and again last thing before going to sleep at night.

Dogs are creatures of habit, and if I can keep her from peeing in the house by having her in her crate or on leash, and if I can get her to pee in the same spot outside over and over, very soon I will have a potty-trained dog that no longer needs to be on leash in the house.

The best way to get a dog to ignore cats is to again establish the relationship with the dog first. Dogs instictively know that the leader of the pack makes decisions for the rest of the pack. If he sees that you are ignoring the cats then he will know that he doesn't need to worry about them. But like I said, the relationship comes first. He needs to know a few basic commands, starting with a word for praise, a word for correction, and his name so he knows who the heck you're talking to.

That's the single most important reason for obedience training. It may not really matter that your dog knows 25 different commands, but what does matter is that while she was learning those commands your relationship was established. You're the boss, she works for you, and you correct and reward her consistently, in a way that she understands, and in a timely fashion.


millerdakiller 07-17-2007 04:01 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by T.Underhill (Post 335962)
Do not listen to this man.

When your dog runs across a busy highway, what would be the most efficent and sure fire way to make sure he/she knows that that was stupid. I've found that yelling works pretty damn well because now my dog won't go near the street without me.

and the only time i've ever hit me dog was when he bit me. I think thats a fair trade

harryconway 07-17-2007 04:19 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Check out Cesar Millan here: http://www.dogpsychologycenter.com/ This guy does amazing stuff with dogs because he understands dogs. DB's post swooped in as I was posting here. Excellent stuff DB.

Ironcobra 07-17-2007 04:58 AM

Re: Dog training
 
when i first got my dog, i trained him to come on a whistle by taking a bunch of dog treats and bit of meat, i blew the whistle, gave him a treat, blew it again, gave him a treat, i did this about twenty times then again the next day, now when i blow the whistle, he comes to me like a rocket (i dont know if this was mentioned already, i couldn't read DB's awesome post, im to tired)

NUTHA JASON 07-17-2007 08:32 AM

Re: Dog training
 
great answer dogbreath. words from a pro. like cooking shows i like watching thos dog reality shows, dog borstal etc (do you get them in the US?). i like the psychology of the pack idea and how happy the dog normally seems once it understands its place in the pack (family). i think half the time its not that the dog feels like the alpha dog in the family but rather that the dog is completely confused as to where it fits into the scheme of things. half the time consistency is the trainer's best tool. like parenting... the fastest way to mess up a child is to change styles randomly all the time and accept a behaviour today that was heavily punished yesterday. sometimes its good to look at a dog like they were a foreign child who willnever understand english but will soon respond to key words and key actions.

j

T.Underhill 07-17-2007 08:51 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by millerdakiller (Post 336358)
When your dog runs across a busy highway, what would be the most efficent and sure fire way to make sure he/she knows that that was stupid. I've found that yelling works pretty damn well because now my dog won't go near the street without me.

and the only time i've ever hit me dog was when he bit me. I think thats a fair trade

Maybe you should figure out why the dog is running across the street...

NUTHA JASON 07-17-2007 10:39 AM

Re: Dog training
 
to get the chicken.


brrp ... dish

fijjibo 07-17-2007 10:49 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NUTHA JASON (Post 336521)
to get the chicken.


brrp ... dish

lol.


I have a Whippet, and she is seven years old.

She will never learn that some stuff is wrong, as whippets naturally steal and hide food....

She is pretty well trained for a silly hound....
lol

katman 07-17-2007 10:51 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NUTHA JASON (Post 336521)
to get the chicken.


brrp ... dish

Is it also frowned upon to yell at chickens for crossing the road?

NUTHA JASON 07-17-2007 11:03 AM

Re: Dog training
 
yes but that is because chickens are so dumb they don't know they are dead after decapitation.

taste good though...
http://www.cruisinchicken.com/pageimages/homepage.gif

Q. Cur gallina per viam transire maluit?

R. Ut in altera parte viae ambularet.


hmmmmmmm....gallina...garrrrggghhhhhhhhhhhh!

fijjibo 07-17-2007 11:08 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NUTHA JASON (Post 336531)

Q. Cur gallina per viam transire maluit?

R. Ut in altera parte viae ambularet.


hmmmmmmm....gallina...garrrrggghhhhhhhhhhhh!

Erm....yeah......I totally DO understand.....

millerdakiller 07-18-2007 06:12 AM

Re: Dog training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by T.Underhill (Post 336475)
Maybe you should figure out why the dog is running across the street...

he followed me across the street. I went to the 711 across the street and my dog tried to follow me. I didn't notice until a car came screeching to a stop and I saw him standing in the middle of the street.


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