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Thrash Drummer 07-10-2007 04:53 AM

Mixing Guitars
 
I can't get that "full" sound that professional studios offer.
For guitars, (a rhythm track in the middle), would it make sense to double the guitar track and pan one completely right and one completely left? Would this scenerio be any different than simply doubling the track and keeping it dead center? I have tried this (2 tracks dead center) with somewhat sucessful results, but still not what I'm looking for.
There are still more questions...do you use a compressor on guitars? Any other effects?
Basically, I'm asking if anyone have some tips for mixing guitars.

Wavelength 07-10-2007 05:37 AM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
For a fat sound, try recording two (or more) takes of the same guitar part and pan them slightly apart. The natural inaccuracies will create an effect of space. A hint of chorus won't hurt either. Compressor should be used if you're trying to keep the volume consistent. Just go easy with it so you don't lose all the dynamics.

IDDrummer 07-10-2007 07:51 AM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wavelength (Post 333608)
For a fat sound, try recording two (or more) takes of the same guitar part and pan them slightly apart. The natural inaccuracies will create an effect of space. A hint of chorus won't hurt either. Compressor should be used if you're trying to keep the volume consistent. Just go easy with it so you don't lose all the dynamics.

Good suggestions. You can even record one take with two or more different mics to get a similar result. I've recorded our guitarist with a condenser, a dynamic tom mic, and a bass drum mic, then panned and balanced the tracks to get a nice full sound.

hawk9290 07-10-2007 03:54 PM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
turn the preamp gain all the way down ;p


seriously: use a couple different types of microphones at slightly different placements around the guitar/guitar amplifier.
Also, what effects are you currently putting on the guitar tracks?

Thrash Drummer 07-10-2007 07:25 PM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
Thanks, I have an opportunity to test your suggestions today.
I'm not doing too much with the guitars.. I pan them according to lead and rhythm, and I EQ them a little. I usually record all guitar parts with one amp (not my idea, the guitarists usually like to use just one) so I EQ the lead and rhythm a little differently and if there are two rhythm tracks at once I EQ them to give them a little seperation. Also, sometimes after a solo or right before a break I'll add some reverb for a cool effect, but that doesn't have to do with the sound quality I'm getting.

I get the drums sounding a lot better ;)

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ 07-11-2007 05:44 AM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
I used to double track guitars. For one song I even used a few different guitars. Double tracking gives it kind of a chorus effect. Lately I have preferred simply using two mics to record my guitar. One right up on the amp, and one far away. I pan each opposite of each other a bit but I never pan anything hard left or right, or dead center for that matter. There are lots of ways to record guitar, just like drums. Experiment a lot and eventually you will find your sound.

For compression on guitars I usually like something around 6:1 to 8:1.The attack won't be super fast, and the release would be a little ways back. I always keep the thresholds barely squeezing the juice. The lights blink just past the tree on the left.

hawk9290 07-11-2007 03:38 PM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Thrash Drummer (Post 333788)
Thanks, I have an opportunity to test your suggestions today.
I'm not doing too much with the guitars.. I pan them according to lead and rhythm, and I EQ them a little. I usually record all guitar parts with one amp (not my idea, the guitarists usually like to use just one) so I EQ the lead and rhythm a little differently and if there are two rhythm tracks at once I EQ them to give them a little seperation. Also, sometimes after a solo or right before a break I'll add some reverb for a cool effect, but that doesn't have to do with the sound quality I'm getting.

I get the drums sounding a lot better ;)

there should always be a slight bit of reverb on the track to give it more of a room-y type of effect instead of the close-mic'd amp effect. Don't go crazy with the reverb, just a little touch of it, and a hint of delay doesn't hurt either. Try getting them to use more than one amp, it will help you a lot. Definitley use more than one mic or do multi-tracking of the same guitar part too. You also might have a chorus effect somewhere too, which you could use as well.

Thrash Drummer 07-18-2007 01:09 AM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
How far do you place the mics from the amp? I talked to a guy a guitar center today and he said about 8 inches or more. It brings out more bass when its farther away.
Also, how do you combat phasing problems?
My bro did guitars today and it wan't what I hoped to hear, we will redo it tommorow.

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ 07-18-2007 01:20 AM

Re: Mixing Guitars
 
The distance from the speaker just depends. Some people like to actually let the mic touch the grill of the cab. The farther away the more air movement you will capture. You just need to experiment to find what is a right balance.

Phase issues just depend on how you are mic'ing the amp. If you have one mic in front, and one on the back of the cab, all you need to do is reverse the phase of one. If you have two mics next to each other facing the cab, you may not completely get rid of the phase issues. Phase cancellation isn't necessarily a bad thing. You can use it as sort of an EQ to an extent. The only real problem is if you are losing parts of the mix when you check it in mono. If you expect your song to be played on any mono system this would be a concern. If you have wide phase cancellation, this can be tiring on the ears over an extended period of time. A little cancellation won't hurt anything. Aside from checking with your ears, you can get plugins for your software that will show you a graph of the phase relationship that you may want to check into. I use the one that Waves makes.


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