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-   -   Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio? (http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=104736)

drum_aruba 02-26-2013 02:46 PM

Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
After some research I think I am going for these mics as a starting set for my home studio.

Shure beta 52 - bass drum
Shure sm57 - snare
2 Shure Sm81 - overheads


Let me know what you guys think..

Thanks!

makinao 02-26-2013 03:10 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Hmmmm ... that's a good set of starter drum mics for ANY studio. For that matter, they aren't "starter" mics at all. They are the real deal.

drum_aruba 02-26-2013 08:18 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by makinao (Post 1113512)
Hmmmm ... that's a good set of starter drum mics for ANY studio. For that matter, they aren't "starter" mics at all. They are the real deal.

What I meant with starter was actually the start of buying mics for my drum studio and practice room.. not a starter mic pack..

will the 2 overheads be overkill.. or can I do with a single OH?

makinao 02-26-2013 11:44 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Getting a pair of small diaphram condensers (SDC) allows you to do stereo miking. This applies to drum overheads, guitars, pianos, saxes, choirs, full and chamber orchestras, and literally all acoustic solo instruments and ensembles. SM81s are VERY good SDCs. They are staples in every major studio I've worked in since the 1970s. They are quiet, neutral, and versatile. If you have the money (because they are not cheap) get the two SM81s. You will not regret it.

The SM57 is another insanely versatile dynamic microphone. It is in every studios' arsenal. You can use it for snares, toms, kicks, guitar amps, and in a pinch even vocals. A must have.

I've not used SM52 Beta yet, so I don't know how it sounds. My only issue with it is since it is promoted as a specialized mic, it may not be versatile. My option would be to get another SM57 for your kick, or get an RE20 if you can afford it. The RE20 is another long time industry staple. It doubles as a fantastic vocal mic.

audiotech 02-27-2013 06:57 AM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
It sounds like a good place to start, although I'm not at all a fan to pre-equalized bass drum microphones. If you're buying SM81s, the ElectroVoice RE20 doesn't seem like a long reach away in terms of expense. If you're going to use a pre-equalized microphone, 112, 52, 868, 902 or others, try not to get it too close to the resonant head to help alleviate some of its proximity effect. After purchasing these microphones, just add a Shure 57 now and then to cover your toms. I don't know your genre of music, but I always mic my hi hats so they don't get lost in the mix when playing intricate patterns.

BTW, I would buy a pair of the SM81s, they'll give you many opportunities for different miking techniques no matter if you go stereo or not.

Dennis

Bo Eder 02-27-2013 08:31 AM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drum_aruba (Post 1113602)
What I meant with starter was actually the start of buying mics for my drum studio and practice room.. not a starter mic pack..

will the 2 overheads be overkill.. or can I do with a single OH?

You can use a single overhead. But when I do that, on the playback, I like how having two gives you the space depth of stereo (I have mine at a 45-degree angle to one another with the capsules facing each other). In a live situation you can't tell so one is ok.

drum_aruba 03-01-2013 04:43 AM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bo Eder (Post 1113779)
You can use a single overhead. But when I do that, on the playback, I like how having two gives you the space depth of stereo (I have mine at a 45-degree angle to one another with the capsules facing each other). In a live situation you can't tell so one is ok.

Bo... What do you mean with the mics facing in a 45 degree angle exactly?

canada_rokzz 03-01-2013 08:05 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Look up "xy overhead mics" in google or YouTube. That will get you started.

BacteriumFendYoke 03-01-2013 08:29 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drum_aruba (Post 1114328)
Bo... What do you mean with the mics facing in a 45 degree angle exactly?

The critical thing is that no matter what equipment you have, without having a sound knowledge of the different techniques and processes that recording entails, your recordings will not sound as good as you would expect. Throwing money and high-end gear at recording equipment is not the answer. In many cases, you're better off buying a reference book (I use 'Modern Recording Techniques' from Focal Press) for $35 and spending a little less on the equipment - the textbook will more than make up for the shortfall is equipment spending.

I've heard terrible recordings with high-end gear and I've heard good results with microphones that I would usually consider unsuitable (SM57s all around, including overheads). Having a combination of knowledge, experience and high-end gear will get you the best results but the knowledge is really the critical factor.

The microphones you've listed are excellent. Reading a lot more around the subject and experimenting with placement and room treatment will get you the best results.

x_25 03-04-2013 10:00 PM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BacteriumFendYoke (Post 1114496)
The critical thing is that no matter what equipment you have, without having a sound knowledge of the different techniques and processes that recording entails, your recordings will not sound as good as you would expect. Throwing money and high-end gear at recording equipment is not the answer. In many cases, you're better off buying a reference book (I use 'Modern Recording Techniques' from Focal Press) for $35 and spending a little less on the equipment - the textbook will more than make up for the shortfall is equipment spending.

I've heard terrible recordings with high-end gear and I've heard good results with microphones that I would usually consider unsuitable (SM57s all around, including overheads). Having a combination of knowledge, experience and high-end gear will get you the best results but the knowledge is really the critical factor.

The microphones you've listed are excellent. Reading a lot more around the subject and experimenting with placement and room treatment will get you the best results.


This, this, this and this again. When I started I couldn't get a good drum sound for my life. Now I can get a decent sound out of a whole kit with just one SM57! (Totaly posible).

That said, that is a very good set of mics to start with (and a good idea to just start with good ones, learned my lesson there too!). I am going to agree with the others on the RE20 though, you will get more use out of it.

gconyers 03-09-2013 01:08 AM

Re: Is this a good starting set of mics for home studio?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by makinao (Post 1113512)
Hmmmm ... that's a good set of starter drum mics for ANY studio. For that matter, they aren't "starter" mics at all. They are the real deal.

You can't go wrong with these mics.


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