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FineVisionz 12-23-2014 07:28 PM

Looking to get into drum recording
 
Hello, I want to get into drum recording and I was wondering if any of you could help me. I am looking for a sound something like these.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKwNdDRExEc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIMtCyTlSGA

My local musical store, Sam ash, has them so I when in and took a look around. I talked to a guy who recommend me a $500 MIDI interface something like the Focusrite Scarlett 18i20 (I'm not sure which one was in store.) I don't have that kind of budget. My original plan was to get something like the Alesis MultiMix 16 USB FX 16-Channel Mixer but the guy told me it wont record into individual tracks, so thats when he showed me the $500 interface. Do I need something like that? Or will something like the TASCAM US-1800 work just fine? If you have any recommendations on a interface/mixer and microphones I would love to here them!

KamaK 12-23-2014 07:58 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
The general consensus is that fewer quality mics are better than a higher quantity of cheap mics.

Start with a 4 mic core. Fewer cables, fewer stands. Fewer input channels on your interface. Fewer channels to mix and worry about phase. Lower HDD storage requirements. Less setup time. 50% less hassle than the Samson, and you end up with 4 nice/diverse mics that you can use for other instruments besides drums or resell if needed.

I just purchased a 4 mic setup here and have samples of the results.

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=121114

FineVisionz 12-23-2014 08:15 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KamaK (Post 1314175)
The general consensus is that fewer quality mics are better than a higher quantity of cheap mics.

Start with a 4 mic core. Fewer cables, fewer stands. Fewer input channels on your interface. Fewer channels to mix and worry about phase. Lower HDD storage requirements. Less setup time. 50% less hassle than the Samson, and you end up with 4 nice/diverse mics that you can use for other instruments besides drums or resell if needed.

I just purchased a 4 mic setup here and have samples of the results.

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=121114

That sounds really good! The only problem with this I think Is that I will be playing hard rock-metal so a lot of double bass and cymbals. My current set up right now is a 7-piece kit ( 3 mounted toms, 2 floor,1 snare, and 1 bass drum.) I also have 4 cymbals not including the hi-hat. I just think 4 microphones won't really cut it for my set. Then again, what do I know? I am new to drum recording.

BillRayDrums 12-23-2014 08:18 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
We use a Zoom R16 deck to capture our audio and we marry it up to the GoPro video we capture. Ends up sounding something like this.

KamaK 12-23-2014 08:40 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314179)
Then again, what do I know? I am new to drum recording.

With the "7 piece mic kits", you get two narrow condenser mics up top, and they do a fairly good job in XY or ORTF capturing all of the cymbals. They have a fairly narrow focus, so positioning is critical. Tom mics capture the tom sounds.

With the 4 mic setup, you use (AT 2020) large-diaphragm condensers as overheads. The focus is very wide. The only thing you need to check for is equidistance. It captures both the toms and the cymbals just fine.

Full-Compas's AT2020 blurb

Listen to the toms/cymbals: http://youtu.be/MqiahLv8NFI If I want to bring the toms down in the mix, I simply cut the lows.

Primer on overhead Mic Positioning from sonic scoop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bct-5YbKGlU

FineVisionz 12-23-2014 09:11 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KamaK (Post 1314187)
With the "7 piece mic kits", you get two narrow condenser mics up top, and they do a fairly good job in XY or ORTF capturing all of the cymbals. They have a fairly narrow focus, so positioning is critical. Tom mics capture the tom sounds.

With the 4 mic setup, you use (AT 2020) large-diaphragm condensers as overheads. The focus is very wide. The only thing you need to check for is equidistance. It captures both the toms and the cymbals just fine.

Full-Compas's AT2020 blurb

Listen to the toms/cymbals: http://youtu.be/MqiahLv8NFI If I want to bring the toms down in the mix, I simply cut the lows.

Primer on overhead Mic Positioning from sonic scoop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bct-5YbKGlU

Ok, If I went for the few better quality microphone route. I am spending a bit more money than I would like. For an example, your personal set up would cost me about $856.94 without the cables. I wanted to keep my final price around $600.

I understand why you would say get fewer better quality microphones than more cheaper microphones, but to be honest I kinda like the sound of the CAD PRO-7 or the Samson 7 Mic Kit mic tests that I have seen videos on YouTube.

KamaK 12-23-2014 09:26 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314198)
I understand why you would say get fewer better quality microphones than more cheaper microphones, but to be honest I kinda like the sound of the CAD PRO-7 or the Samson 7 Mic Kit mic tests that I have seen videos on YouTube.

Indeed. Ultimately, do what makes you happy.

Note:
Used 57 - 75
Used 602 - 100
two new AT2020's - 160
4 Cables / stands - 120
Used R16 - 275

With taxes/shipping, I made out for about $800 and change

JustJames 12-23-2014 10:04 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314198)
Ok, If I went for the few better quality microphone route. I am spending a bit more money than I would like...

Possibly.

But you're only spending it once.

I know nothing about recording, but I know a great deal about spending money on equipment for hobbies. And the one thing that I've learnt is that spending more money on better equipment stings, but stings less than first spending less money on inferior equipment followed by spending more money on better equipment.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 12:07 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JustJames (Post 1314210)
Possibly.

But you're only spending it once.

I know nothing about recording, but I know a great deal about spending money on equipment for hobbies. And the one thing that I've learnt is that spending more money on better equipment stings, but stings less than first spending less money on inferior equipment followed by spending more money on better equipment.

I see what you mean here, but I don't know how long I'm going to be into drum recording, so I don't want to go out and spend a bunch of money on premium equipment that I may not use after a wile. You have a very good point though and I will definitely keep that in mind now.

Thanks

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 02:43 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Ok, I think I have decided to go with the Samson 7 or 8 piece mic kit for my mics because one of my favorite YouTube drummers uses them (Cobus Potgieter). Now What about an interface? I would like the ability to record every mic onto it's own track/channel so I can EQ each separately. My budget for one is around the $200 maybe a bit more if it was completely worth it.

drum4fun27302 12-24-2014 02:48 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Tascam us1800. Comes with basic cubase where you have all the eq you can have.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 04:11 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
As I am watching videos of the Samson 8 Kit microphone set, how come some of them sound good and some of them sound not as good?

Here are some examples,

Good:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKwNdDRExEc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SKxye3WbLI

Not so good:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19GSGh01rJ8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhQX_oVEhsk

Embalmer 12-24-2014 05:51 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314268)
Ok, I think I have decided to go with the Samson 7 or 8 piece mic kit for my mics because one of my favorite YouTube drummers uses them (Cobus Potgieter). Now What about an interface? I would like the ability to record every mic onto it's own track/channel so I can EQ each separately. My budget for one is around the $200 maybe a bit more if it was completely worth it.

Let me put my $.02 in this discussion. I record at home in my garage and I have done a lot of experimenting in this arena. Mostly my son and I play together. He plays his guitars and I play my drums together with him. So, we have his guitar cabinet miked up along with all my drums. I use the TASCAM-1800 because of the number of inputs it gives.

So, I have my drums miked as follows: Kick has an Audix D6 mounted in the drum using the Kelly Shu system. My snare is only top miced with an Audix i5. My 8 and 10" toms are miced with cheap KAM tom mics but they sound awesome. My 12" tom has an Audix D2. My 14 and 16" toms use an Audix D4 each. I use 2 Audio-Technica AT-2040 overheads. And Audix f series condensors for my hi hats and ride. The 2 high pitched octobans are miced with 2 Shure SM57's and the low pitched ones use a Audix f90 condensor.
The aux snare and jam blocks etc... use an SM57. My octos and hats and aux snare are routed through a Behringer mixer, which plugs into the back side of my TASCAM unit as a line in. All of the other drum mics are routed to the TASCAM directly as you can see in the pics. My TASCAM is plugged into my PC via USB and I use Reaper software to record, mix, etc. We use really good quality Shure headphones so we can only hear ourselves through the mics and not externally and a Presonus headphone amplifier and splitter. I also use M Audio BX series monitors so I can hear the music externally. As you can imagine, all this equipment cost a lot of money. Not to mention the drums themselves and guitars. And the learning curve for recording and mixing is huge, but there are a lot of helpful sites out there.

Our latest impromptu jam

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...psd1cb3650.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...ps6d06c86e.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...pscd5b41b5.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...ps9db7259a.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...ps76dc4aad.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...pscfadc11c.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...psb02ac59f.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...psdbb15ec3.jpg

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j5...ps7c0ade54.jpg

KamaK 12-24-2014 05:58 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314280)
As I am watching videos of the Samson 8 Kit microphone set, how come some of them sound good and some of them sound not as good?

Mixing, EQ, Treatment (compression, reverb), mic placement, instrument tuning, instrument quality, performer quality, the room, interface used, preamp used.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 07:47 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KamaK (Post 1314297)
Mixing, EQ, Treatment (compression, reverb), mic placement, instrument tuning, instrument quality, performer quality, the room, interface used, preamp used.

What if I didn't get a pre amp? What would the affect be if I didn't get one and what would the effect be I I got one?

Matt Bo Eder 12-24-2014 08:35 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
I'm with Billy Ray, and I use a Zoom R16 too.

I get that computer recording is the thing to do these days, but it's puzzling that to many people it seems to be the only way to do things now. The R16 can do all your recording onto an SD card and you can mix down from there to stereo, and not use a computer at all.

The R16 can also be an 8-channel IN USB interface into a computer if you want to do that, but you don't have to. This is what makes the R16 (and R24) such cool devices because they can be standalone in addition to being the front-end of a computer rig. But I think if you know nothing about recording, throwing a computer into the process just makes everything unnecessarily difficult. You need to learn how to mic up a kit and how to get a good sound recorded. You do not need to be spending time on the digital recording learning curve by configuring your USB interface, then learning how that talks to the audio recording program within your computer, etc.,....

There will be a slight learning curve just learning how to run the recorder, but that's all there should be. It's easier to envision what you want to do after you know what you're trying to do. Let's put the horse before the cart and say you need to be able to take some mics, and how do you position those to get a good sound into the recorder? Start there. You can do that with just two mics.

My two cents.

KamaK 12-24-2014 06:21 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314317)
What if I didn't get a pre amp? What would the affect be if I didn't get one and what would the effect be I I got one?

Your Tascam has built in preamps, as does the Zoom.

Without a preamp, a microphone wouldn't produce any sound.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 06:34 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KamaK (Post 1314410)
Your Tascam has built in preamps, as does the Zoom.

Without a preamp, a microphone wouldn't produce any sound.

Ok, so if I went for the Samson 8 pack microphone and the Tascan us-1800 is this all I would need?

http://amzn.com/w/27LIW50BZHCI8

The only thing that might not be correct is the microphone boom stand as they may not be tall enough.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 06:43 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Just for the heck of it, I want share what I have been able to record with a single rock band microphone. Every instrument (Bass, Electric guitar, and Drums) Were recorded separately with a single USB rock band microphone straight into audacity. It is not perfect as me and a few friends of mine put this together in a few hours.

https://soundcloud.com/fearlesswesta...n-fall-out-boy

bobdadruma 12-24-2014 07:16 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
1 Attachment(s)
I recently graduated to higher quality mic-s. I have begun to use a Shure SM57 on my snare. On my toms I still use less expensive Nady mic-s. I use reasonable quality condenser overheads. I also use a Mixer and an Interface. My results have been very good. I will gradually progress to using more pro level mic-s like the SM57 in the near future.
Learning how to EQ drums is also important. I spent a good bit of time experimenting and learning. It is fun to record your drums and your band.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 07:20 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Ok, I am kind confused one what is better and whats the difference in these. The Tascan us-1800 records everything into its separate track to be EQ'd. But something like the Alesis MultiMix 16 USB records everything into one track but can be EQ'd on the board instead of on the computer. Is there a difference? Do they do anything else different/better?

bobdadruma 12-24-2014 07:24 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314425)
Ok, I am kind confused one what is better and whats the difference in these. The Tascan us-1800 records everything into its separate track to be EQ'd. But something like the Alesis MultiMix 16 USB records everything into one track but can be EQ'd on the board instead of on the computer. Is there a difference? Do they do anything else different/better?

When I record my whole band I use the mixer to send two right and left drum channels to my Tascam 1800. That leaves channels on the Tascam open for the band instruments and the vocals.
I remove the Tascam 1800 interface and I leave the mixer hooked up to my kit when I am not recording. This allows me to plug the headphones into the mixer and play my kit all EQ-d up whenever I want to.

FineVisionz 12-24-2014 07:51 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bobdadruma (Post 1314427)
When I record my whole band I use the mixer to send two right and left drum channels to my Tascam 1800. That leaves channels on the Tascam open for the band instruments and the vocals.
I remove the Tascam 1800 interface and I leave the mixer hooked up to my kit when I am not recording. This allows me to plug the headphones into the mixer and play my kit all EQ-d up whenever I want to.

I like the idea physical EQ'ing such a non rack mounted mixer. Can a non rack mounted mixer such as this one:
http://www.samash.com/alesis-multimi...udio-amm16usbf
have each microphone input be recorded on a separate track onto the computer? Or does that only work with the rack mounted mixers?

KamaK 12-24-2014 08:47 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314412)
Ok, so if I went for the Samson 8 pack microphone and the Tascan us-1800 is this all I would need?

http://amzn.com/w/27LIW50BZHCI8

The only thing that might not be correct is the microphone boom stand as they may not be tall enough.

Yes, though that mic kit only has a single condenser. This makes stereo pairing extremely difficult.

With drums, you start with the core. Kick and an overhead. If you want to move into the realm of stereo, you typically add a second identical overhead. You then add mics to the instruments you want to feature, which usually begins with the snare. After the core is set up, you begin adding mics to feature instruments that you want to manipulate in the mix.

Look at the setup that Embalmer has above. He has basically the same 4-mic core that everyone is recommending (Large condenser stereo pair, kick mic, snare mic) plus one auxiliary mic for each instrument he wants to, or may want to feature.

The last tip is that you don't need the tall boom-stand if this gear is never going to move, and is in a room with a low ceiling. Simply hang the mics.

Regarding Zoom versus Tascam.

The Zoom gives you the following benefits.

1: Control surface and Transport
2: Portability and offline/standalone recording (it even runs on batteries)
3: 2 built-in-microphones for ad-hoc/spot recording

The Tascam gives you the following benefits -

1: 6 more (than 2) phantom power channels for condensers
2: 2 additional hi-z inputs for instruments

Either way, do what makes you happy. Understand that you will likely arrive at the same conclusion in 6 months, and your budget will have been consumed. You'll spend a lot less time making music and a lot more trying to dial in each instrument to piece together a composite sound that already exists in the ambient space around your drums.

PS - your band sounds wonderful. Great stuff. Never stop writing and playing music.

KamaK 12-24-2014 08:52 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314431)
I like the idea physical EQ'ing such a non rack mounted mixer. Can a non rack mounted mixer such as this one:
http://www.samash.com/alesis-multimi...udio-amm16usbf
have each microphone input be recorded on a separate track onto the computer? Or does that only work with the rack mounted mixers?


No. You basically get stereo out, or mono + a featured instrument. It also does not operate as a control surface.

Quote:

DIGITAL RECORDING MADE EASY
Your Alesis MultiMix 16 USB FX mixer is also your USB computer audio interface, providing two channels of audio recording and two channels of audio playback with your Mac or PC. This single-cable USB connection provides 16-bit digital audio at either 44.1 (CD-quality) or 48 kHz. The USB playback can be routed to the MultiMix 16 USB FX main outputs, monitor outputs, or both for maximum flexibility.
An example of a multichannel interface mixer would be Presonus's StudioLive series.

bobdadruma 12-24-2014 11:18 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
I see that you question was answered by KamaK.
I find that it is easier to mix and EQ my kit on an analog mixer and reduce the kit down to right and left channels to be sent to the interface. This allows me to not worry about the drums while I am recording other instruments and vocals.
The less channels that you process allows for a better recording because your computer can process faster. If you are trying to process 14 channels at once through an interface you may find that your computer has issues such as latency while monitoring and hard drive speed warnings.
Just my observation from personal experience.
I also record to an external hard drive. This allows my computer to not have to be reading my internal hard drive while it is writing on it at the same time.
I shut off things like bluetooth and wifi too so that my processor isn't wasting time running background programs that aren't needed.
I use 16GB of RAM. The computer only came with 4GB of RAM. I am currently saving for an internal SSD (Solid State Drive) to speed my computer up even more.

FineVisionz 12-25-2014 11:17 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Are there any non rack mounted mixers out there that can record each input into separate tracks that are around $200-$300 ?

bobdadruma 12-25-2014 11:56 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314676)
Are there any non rack mounted mixers out there that can record each input into separate tracks that are around $200-$300 ?

I have never seen any in that range.
The prices take a big jump when you get into something that is that complicated. 16+ channel mixer/interfaces are in the professional level.
My 14 channel analog mixer was about $250 new and I bought an inexpensive one. I bought my US-1800 14 channel USB interface used for about $100.

KamaK 12-26-2014 01:20 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1314676)
Are there any non rack mounted mixers out there that can record each input into separate tracks that are around $200-$300 ?

Not that I am aware of, and the lowest-end one I would touch is the Presonus StudioLive. It's basically a digital mixer with an 1818VSL built into it. I looked at this before buying the Zoom .There's a 24chan version in my brother's nightclub, which is nice because he can give a band their raw tracks at the end of the night. At $1000, it was simply too much for me, and the learning curve was a little more that I wanted to invest.

Perhaps one of the other OEMs (Mackie?) has a new inexpensive one out, you'll have to check.

One thing that I'd like to disagree with is the addition of EQ prior to recording. I am heavily in favor of recording raw and adding EQ during mix down. You can cut whatever you need during mix down, but you cannot reclaim audio that you've EQ'd out during the recording phase. This might be a philosophical difference though. Hopefully a pro-audio guy will chime in and set you straight.

Jankowske 12-26-2014 08:24 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
My 2 cents:

The fewer high-end gear versus more cheap gear is a good argument. When I was in high school, my drafting teacher told us "if you don't have time to do it right the first time, then when will you have time to do it right again?" That was kind of an epiphany since I had never heard it before. Anyways, the same can be true of buying stuff, but I found myself in a situation where I wanted 8 mics and an interface to record my drums, but I definitely couldn't fork out for top-dollar or even "respectable" gear. I have quite a few months until I'm working again and so I intend on finishing an album of my band, but I had a tight budget. I opted for more "cheap" mics/gear since I really wanted close mics on my toms. I ended up getting

-tascam us-1800 interface, $180 (black friday deal!)
-six used CAD drum mics, $130
-used sennheiser e602, $110
-two new 20ft xlrs and boom stands, $20 (...don't ask)
-eight xlr ends, $10 (to turn my collection of 20-footers into twice as many 10s)

Not too bad for $450. Granted, I aldready had an sm57, a wad of cables, and a couple stands, but a similar setup would still put you around $600. My reasoning was that I can save up to buy schmancier stuff at any time in the future, but that I might not have such an optimal time like this again. For this particular time and project and resources that I already have, especially considering how much time I can put into it, this setup will do just fine.

Also, good equipment doesn't guarantee a good sound. I was in a college studio last year with about $3000 worth of mics on my kit going into a nice protools rig and being worked on over genelec and jbl monitors. The recording process itself was pretty haphazard, though, and our friend who did this for free was kind of a novice at the time. My poor man's setup has already gotten me tracks that are head and shoulders above those old demos, since I have countless hours to perfect tuning and mic placement and to practice mixing. Remember that the most important part of the signal chain is the performance and source quality, so you and your drums. Talent/practice and good taste come next for mixing. Mics and interfaces are last, assuming you're not using utter garbage.

Nice LDC's are great, if you have a nice room and you plan to get your toms with them. But some SDCs and a fistful of cheap dynamics are better if you want big, fat, controllable toms in a sub-par recording space and the overheads are more for just cymbals. And the tascam us-1800 or something similar is perfect. Analog mixing can be cool, but it's expensive and kind of un-undoable, and there's nothing wrong with doing it all "in the box."

bobdadruma 12-26-2014 02:01 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
I agree, record with a flat EQ and adjust the sound and add effects later as desired. Buy quality gear that is within your budget.

Here is a link to a recording that I made last Monday with my Tascam US-1800.
On the kit, I had two Samson CO2 overhead condensers, a Shure SM57 on the snare and a Nady DM80 on the BD.
SM57's were used for the bass guitar amp, and also for the Sax and Trumpet.
The piano was plugged direct into two line in channels on the 1800.
MacBook Pro computer and GarageBand were used.
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/whsmohlnh...vd8GtYNDa?dl=0

ermghoti 12-26-2014 06:01 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
I advice new guys to spend their money where the sound is. Physical mixer controls are nice, but they don't affect the sound. So, get an interface wit height channels (I gathered you're up against double-bass kits, so five mics would be a good start).

Haunt eBay for used ATM25s until you have two. Exclusively for heavy bass drums, I prefer D6s, and I won't argue if you go that route, but the ATM25 is way more flexible, works great on toms, cabs, and even voice. They were an amazing value when bought used for a while (I got one for $75, and one for $125, IIRC), got ridiculously high priced after they were initially discontinued, but now that they are back in production, they are getting quite reasonable again.

SM57 for snare. Sometimes, another mic will do a better job, but I've never not been able to get a usable sound with a SM57.

Overheads... the world's your oyster, depending on budget. I'll mostly use AT4050s, but they will murder your budget, and I've gotten perfectly decent tracks with SP B1s and even Carvin's SM81 copies.

If you end up wanting more mics for toms, you'll probably just be needing them for effects sends, so you can tear up and rewire earbud headphones for next to nothing.

KamaK 12-26-2014 06:25 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jankowske (Post 1314753)
Nice LDC's are great, if you have a nice room and you plan to get your toms with them. But some SDCs and a fistful of cheap dynamics are better if you want big, fat, controllable toms in a sub-par recording space and the overheads are more for just cymbals.

The other issue that may present itself with LDC's is isolation. Other ambient noise (loud guitar) can sneak in if the amplifiers are positioned incorrectly or you record/rehearse in a lunch-box.

FineVisionz 12-26-2014 06:49 PM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KamaK (Post 1314867)
The other issue that may present itself with LDC's is isolation. Other ambient noise (loud guitar) can sneak in if the amplifiers are positioned incorrectly or you record/rehearse in a lunch-box.

I am am planning on recording drums separate to every one else so I don't think I will have this problem.

SteveRatz 12-27-2014 02:13 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
My setup: zoomR16, 2xAKG Perception 170 condensers, AKG D112, cheap set of 5 drum mics with clips. I'm very happy with this setup. Used the Zoom lots of times at rehearsals and gigs, throw it in a backpack, plus if the other guys want to take it home and overdub then it's so easy without worrying about software and laptops etc. With the mics my view us spend a bit more on the large diaphragm kick plus condenser overheads as most dynamic mics for snare and toms will do an okay job. IMHO etc

FineVisionz 12-28-2014 12:35 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Just wondering what your guys's input is. What drum mic kit would you get if you were in my position? I have $300 to spend on drum mics.

KamaK 12-28-2014 12:54 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1315149)
Just wondering what your guys's input is. What drum mic kit would you get if you were in my position? I have $300 to spend on drum mics.

I'd drop down to a single AT2020, a SM57, and a used $100 kick mic (B52, E602, D8). Upgrade to a second AT2020 when the funds become available.

If you go for a cheap kit, buy one with two overhead condensers.

Embalmer 12-28-2014 01:41 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FineVisionz (Post 1315149)
Just wondering what your guys's input is. What drum mic kit would you get if you were in my position? I have $300 to spend on drum mics.

I have the KAM tom mics. I think they are a great value. I would recommend any of their mics.

http://kaminstruments.com/pro_mics.htm

SteveRatz 12-28-2014 02:13 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
By the way I've been impressed by the 'Recorderman' technique of mic'ing the kit, good balance of the kit: emphasises kick and snare most, then toms, finally cymbals. Realistic stereo too.

FineVisionz 12-28-2014 06:05 AM

Re: Looking to get into drum recording
 
Ok, since I really like the sound of the Samson microphone kits, I think I will just go with them. My final question is, which pack should I get? The 7 or 8 microphone pack.

Also I would like to say I am sorry If I got you frustrated as I wouldn't be surprised if I did.


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