YouTube for the working drummer?

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Sounds like a book title but I was wondering if I could get the forums opinions on using youtube for promotion and the type of material is best to have up there.

I'm looking to get some new content to use for promotion for all aspects of what i do - Live
,Studio and teaching but IMO there are way to many youtube "lessons" out there and FAR to many drum covers so I'm trying to find the type of things to include before I can get some good live videos?

What do you have up on YouTUbe?

Do you find having a video presence is good for getting new clients/students?

I'm particularly interested in using YouTUbe more to push the online session thing I do which is an area that could do with being expanded and could perform a lot better than it is atm.

All opinions from pros and youtubers alike.

D
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
For session work, I think it would be nice to have up some shot clips of you playing various genres.

Within these you could show off, various gear, tunings, have a simple groove orientated version and maybe a more showy version to demonstrate what you get when you hire Dave Major to play your session.

If you could get some stuff you have played on previously, and the bands/artists ok it, you could always film a video of the set up you used and effectively mime it (not cheating in terms of promotion as you played the original parts). Or alternatively re-video the drums.
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Yeah got some of them already but will do more. Also played some sessions more recently that I haven't got any video for...or aren't finished on the clients end so I can't use em!

Cheers for replying man

D
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
There's no reason not to have one, unless you want to keep your playing to yourself.

If you want people to see your drumming for what it is, don't worry about the likes, subscribers, views etc, there are lots of great drummers on youtube who don't have that sort of popularity (and some mediocre players that do). I've often scouted for musicians online and I've used my youtube and my soundcloud to show them my playing and it's always been effective.

If you do want to achieve ''youtube success'' it's really become the standard to have everything professionally recorded, filmed, presented and you do have to think about how to reach and impress the vast majority. It does seem like lots of these guys are touching up their performances with quantizing, editing, using multiple takes so you do have your work cut out for you.
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Hey Dre - cheers for replying man.

Already have youtube channels all set up but it's the content I want to look at.

Teaching/Live one - https://www.youtube.com/user/davemajorlessons/featured?view_as=public

Studio https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbAwpI-69yqxCMfIo3hVusw

I couldnt give a rats ass about youtube success - hence the need want not to do drum covers or lessons as that is over saturated.

If you were looking for a teacher in your local area what would you want to see online to see if he was the guy for you?
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Oh right. Yes I would.

But I think there are cases where it could work against you.

Like if you try to pitch it to some youth who has different expectations about what a great drummer is. And it's too easy to click a suggested video in the right hand column and see someone that blazes (nothing against you, I tried to watch your video but it won't load)... so you would be putting yourself in a position where it's easy to be compared to another drummer.

So, as long as you make a really kick ass demo, I say go for it.
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
Yeah got some of them already but will do more. Also played some sessions more recently that I haven't got any video for...or aren't finished on the clients end so I can't use em!

Cheers for replying man

D
No worries, this came to me off the top of my head, without actually checking your current youtube stuff. whoops! I see you have that kind of stuff already. From a Marketing standpoint youtube is a pain because its not like its easy to be organised with the layout. Picture it as a digital business card and make sure that if you direct someone to your youtube page they can get what they need easily.

Perhaps the best thing is to have the youtube videos laid out in a more sensible way, split by genre on your website, maybe even have one all encompassing show reel video at the top. And then a link to the full youtube should people really want to dive in.

I'm actually going to be looking for a teacher myself in the next 6 months when I move back to the northeast. So my take on that.

Personally what I want from a teacher is:

1. Someone who can teach me how to read
2. Someone who can sharpen up my technique
3. Someone who can provide fresh and interesting methods which offer genuine progress
4. Someone who can tailor their approach to my favourite styles of music
5. Someone who can introduce me to different styles of music
6. Someone who adds that something extra, like teaching composition, songwriting from a drumming perspective, etc
7. passion for the instrument

Now I'm not 100% sure how you impart that kind of thing in a youtube video format, but looking through your videos the ones that caught my eye were the ones that are a little bit different/unique.

Love the one on cheat sheets and all of the creative process ones.

You have a very Tommy Igoe'ness about you, ie you speak naturally very well, and I instantly feel like you are a buddy who is giving me a hand.

So again from a marketing perspective, if you can find a way to present your personality, teaching style, and focus on what makes you a little bit different and stand out from the rest, that would catch my attention.

Of course, I would want to check that you could play and that I liked your playing (you have no probs there), but its that little extra that I would be looking for.
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Oh right. Yes I would.

But I think there are cases where it could work against you.

Like if you try to pitch it to some youth who has different expectations about what a great drummer is. And it's too easy to click a suggested video in the right hand column and see someone that blazes (nothing against you, I tried to watch your video but it won't load)... so you would be putting yourself in a position where it's easy to be compared to another drummer.

So, as long as you make a really kick ass demo, I say go for it.
Good point regarding kids blazing - which I can do if required.

As this year progresses I'm going to be trying and get more and more live/studio/clinic videos which I think are definately less contrived than drum covers/showreel kind of stuff but obviously i need to look at content in the mean time.

Thanks man

No worries, this came to me off the top of my head, without actually checking your current youtube stuff. whoops! I see you have that kind of stuff already. From a Marketing standpoint youtube is a pain because its not like its easy to be organised with the layout. Picture it as a digital business card and make sure that if you direct someone to your youtube page they can get what they need easily.

Perhaps the best thing is to have the youtube videos laid out in a more sensible way, split by genre on your website, maybe even have one all encompassing show reel video at the top. And then a link to the full youtube should people really want to dive in.

I'm actually going to be looking for a teacher myself in the next 6 months when I move back to the northeast. So my take on that.

Personally what I want from a teacher is:

1. Someone who can teach me how to read
2. Someone who can sharpen up my technique
3. Someone who can provide fresh and interesting methods which offer genuine progress
4. Someone who can tailor their approach to my favourite styles of music
5. Someone who can introduce me to different styles of music
6. Someone who adds that something extra, like teaching composition, songwriting from a drumming perspective, etc
7. passion for the instrument

Now I'm not 100% sure how you impart that kind of thing in a youtube video format, but looking through your videos the ones that caught my eye were the ones that are a little bit different/unique.

Love the one on cheat sheets and all of the creative process ones.

You have a very Tommy Igoe'ness about you, ie you speak naturally very well, and I instantly feel like you are a buddy who is giving me a hand.

So again from a marketing perspective, if you can find a way to present your personality, teaching style, and focus on what makes you a little bit different and stand out from the rest, that would catch my attention.

Of course, I would want to check that you could play and that I liked your playing (you have no probs there), but its that little extra that I would be looking for.

Hey man, glad you checked the vids out and dug them.

Yeah that's the kind of stuff I'm looking at. How to sell what i do and the benefits of it.

D
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Diet - As a drummer who already plays what will make you choose one teacher over another?

Lets say there are 2 teachers available for you what will make you choose one over the other.

Dave
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
Diet - As a drummer who already plays what will make you choose one teacher over another?

Lets say there are 2 teachers available for you what will make you choose one over the other.

Dave
I wrote a really convoluted reply and then lost it because of a missing token?????

Lets hope I can be more concise this time!

A large part of it would come down to intangibles, especially if it was a close run thing. But there isn't really anything you can do about that.

In my own unique situation Not only do I want to build my technique back up from the ground and learn to read, but I would ultimately like to teach myself. So I would be looking for someone who can not only teach me how to play but also how to teach.

My two favourite genres of music are metal and New Orleans brass band music, but I'd also like to get into some latin, funk, hip hop and some jazz. So someone who is well versed in all those genres, but can focus on my two main musical loves. I don't know if in the end I will need to find specialists in different genres though?

Perhaps the thing that would clinch it would be sitting down with each teacher and have them explain how they structure lessons and what sort of "homework" they give out. So, not sure how, but if you could work out a kind of "informercial" type video that said "I approach each students needs differently, the first step would be to contact me to find out how i will tailor our sessions to meet your personal goals, an example of a lesson would be.....".

I think if I saw something that made me think. "Ah great, so we spend x amount of time on reading, x on rudiments, then x on genre based grooves, with x amount spent on additional concepts such as songwriting, etc" that would probably get my attention.

But then I have never had proper one on one lessons, so I'm not even sure what I'm expecting to happen from them. Perhaps that would be good information for me (the general population) to hear. What happens in a lesson!
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I could see public posting of your average drumming ability instead of doing many takes and selecting the best as a great ego contol mechanisim.

Just sit and play - post no matter what...warts and all.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
What to put up? Your best stuff, and variety. Will it help? Didn't hurt Justin Beiber although he turned out to be an egotistical punk.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
As far as students/lessons, I'm not sure.

As far as working, yes. People looking to hire a drummer for live shows, tours, etc, have used youtube as either a pre audition, or in place of an audition.

A buddy of mine got hired for a paid US tour after being recommended to the artist. Said artist then looked up said drummer on youtube to verify that was the type of drummer they were looking for, and then hired him off of that without a formal audition.

Keep in mind, the recommendation was the key, not the video, but YT was the deal sealer.

And since then, I've heard of many similar stories.
 
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