YouTube copyrights for drum covers

Noisemakers

Junior Member
Got some insight from searching through some old threads, but what's the best way to not have your drum covers get taken down by YouTube for copyright infringement? I come across tons of drum covers of popular songs that are obviously copyrighted that haven't been taken down.

So what's the trick? Is it putting a message in the description not claiming ownership of the song? I read you could change the pitch of the song, but I'd prefer to only have to do that as a last resort.

I'd appreciate any advice.
 

toddmc

Gold Member
I've never had a cover taken down, but some vids have been banned for viewing in some countries for whatever reason.
No messages of non-ownership were put up and I called a spade a spade in the title description (ie "Band X Drum Cover- Song Y").
I honestly think YT just randomly chooses different cover vids to keep everyone on their toes, but perhaps the no. of views plays a part?
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
I covered speed demon by michael jackson, that is banned in germany for some reason. I have a few other covers but they don't have any infringement note on them.

No need to be concerned.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
YouTube runs every video through an automated system to check for copywrited sound and video.

You should be perfectly fine saying that the video is yours. If not, Yourmoviesucks has a little guide on how to deal with this stuff.
 

Noisemakers

Junior Member
YouTube runs every video through an automated system to check for copywrited sound and video.

You should be perfectly fine saying that the video is yours. If not, Yourmoviesucks has a little guide on how to deal with this stuff.
What do you mean saying the video is mine? Cause technically, it's not mine considering I'm taking someone else's song and just laying my drum track over it.

My video got a "Matched third party content" notice. When I click on the link, here's what shows up. Should I acknowledge it dispute it, or just not do anything?

 
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MrPockets

Gold Member
What do you mean saying the video is mine? Cause technically, it's not mine considering I'm taking someone else's song and just laying my drum track over it.

My video got a "Matched third party content" notice. When I click on the link, here's what shows up. Should I acknowledge it dispute it, or just not do anything?

I believe you should be able to dispute and the company that holds the copywrite should not appeal you. Refer back to the YouTube channel I mentioned to see the video on how it works.
 

sethlowden

Senior Member
For some reason I assumed they were hosted at YouTube and only linked on the site, but I could be wrong (and often am about this kind of stuff). I guess I should check my facts before I embarrass myself.
 

drum4fun27302

Gold Member
I had a couple on there and input the music/song so far behind in the mix (just so people can figure out where they are in the song) that I don't ever think it would be useful for anybody to use.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I just did a cover of Basia "Baby You're Mine" and received a "Matched Third Party Content" notification on youtube. I own the CD. Bought it several years ago. I suppose I don't own the content though. So is it wrong for me to make a video of me playing my drums to a CD that I paid for? Especially when videos exist with this song on youtube already?? Ie, if they're offering a video of the song on youtube for free, who am I hurting by playing my drums to the audio of that video (and recording and uploading that video)?

And what if the drum mix largely over drives the copyrighted content? Can't I argue that it's not a true copy of the content? Afterall, youtube is using software to analyze wave data to determine infringements. I'm thinking I should dispute it, and wait for youtube to contact the other party - UMPG.

Thanks,

Steph
 

liv_rong

Senior Member
I have a couple videos that I made on youtube(not drumming related) that have video clips edited to songs. I had one video, just as posted above, where you are given the opportunity to acknowledge or dispute it and I just hit acknowledge and nothing negative happened. The video is still up except now on the side it shows a link for the actual band and song, no big deal IMO.

 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I had a couple on there and input the music/song so far behind in the mix (just so people can figure out where they are in the song) that I don't ever think it would be useful for anybody to use.
I'm thinking radical here. Like, hey, the main thing is my playing, not the cover material. So just as easily as it is to play to a CD I paid for with my hard earned money, I can just as easily mute the cover song, leaving my drumming part left to be viewed and listened to. Then YouTube wouldn't have a reason to delete my account.

But my question is:

(a) digital content is digital content, and whether you're listening to a CD, an mp3 file, or a YouTube video, the playback rate is exactly, EXACTLY, the same!
(b) so the question becomes... can someone write a widget that will sync someone's drumming effort to any content type, including another YouTube video? I ask this because, as most of us know, it is very easy to play two YouTube videos simultaneously by just opening two tabs in Firefox (or similar browser) and clicking play. And so, if copyrighted content is already on YouTube, then you aren't violating any laws by aligning the sound waves of that content with sound waves of your own content.
(c) separating the playing effort from the cover material would help ease those using the content to learn their musical craft
(d) this would be a widget that would take two URLs and align the playback; it would have to utilize a buffer to store the content temporarily while it analyzed it; it would use, possibly, the same analysis algorithm that YouTube uses to analyze content;

And yes, this is absurd when the very of beauty of YouTube has always been as a great promotion and learning tool. Perhaps I should just acknowledge my infringement and hope they like my "promotion of their cover song" so much that they'll realize I'm an asset, not an ass (oops!!!).

Later,

Steph
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Got some insight from searching through some old threads, but what's the best way to not have your drum covers get taken down by YouTube for copyright infringement? I come across tons of drum covers of popular songs that are obviously copyrighted that haven't been taken down.

So what's the trick? Is it putting a message in the description not claiming ownership of the song? I read you could change the pitch of the song, but I'd prefer to only have to do that as a last resort.

I'd appreciate any advice.
The ones I have seen used a third party(play along) backing track, which could be OK depending on the license of that backing track. If all parts of the cover are recorded by you, then youtube has paid ASCAP, so you are allowed to distribute it in that medium, though maybe not in others. It seems like if the backing track was far enough down in the mix and there were no drum breaks, youtube wouldn't be able to figure it out.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
I have disputed a Dream Theater drum cover and it came back clean as a whistle. I disputed a Metallica cover and it got sh!t on and banned on mobile devices and certain countries.

Surprisingly a Pearl Jam cover I also did got banned on in certain countries, but not mobile devices.
 

JLoveDrums94

Senior Member
I don't quite understand why you guys are making such a big deal about your videos having "matched third party content." I used to make drum covers all the time that would have that, but at least they were still playable. People were still able to view it. Isnt that the point? What difference does it make with or without the "matched third party content?"
 

nfcarbone

Junior Member
It matters because these matched third party videos won't play on mobile devices, which I'm assuming is most of my audience (iPhone/iPad/Android users).

Has anyone figured out why some people can post covers and not get matched content while some people can't?? It's driving me nuts. My videos are so drastically different from the originals, I only use acapella vocals. Here's an examples: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQz83d5kjU8

Any info much appreciated!!

Nick
 
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