Yet another practice thread

XG65

Senior Member
This will possibly be my last forum thread for a while -

So first off, I want to apologize for any rude and/or harsh words I've typed out during my time here.

Secondly, I would like to bring up this topic I mentioned in the title.

Alright, I'm leaving off for my pre-university course in 8 days and I'll be staying at a dormitory with no internet for 5 days a week for at least a year...

The school I'm assigned to is heavy on discipline and academics... which means no bringing "foreign objects" to school, which includes my 'pad and sticks. And we have set times for everything.

So my two questions are :

1) How do you practice using hands and then transition it into stick movements later? ('Cause I don't want to risk getting caught sneaking my sticks into school...)

2) Is there a minimum practice time I should achieve and can I do it in short bursts?

Or should I forgo practice for the 5 days I'm there and cram all of my weekly practice time during the my weekends at home?

Thanks for all your replies, lads.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Well that will be extremely difficult at best.
I guess you should start learning visualization techniques.
You can train your brain to practice patterns, but you will still need to ultimately learn it again with sticks and pedals.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Smuggle sticks in. Tape them to your shin. It's school not prison.

No foreign objects? Really? Make sticks from branches. They would be domestic.

What year is this?
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Playing the drums is a lot more than stick technique, rudiments, speed and chops. The most important component of playing the drums is mental. Learning song structure is very important. Learning how to provide a drum part to the structure of music is a mental operation.

I assume they will allow you to listen to music after class; like in the evenings. The best drummers listen to, and analyze, a lot of music every day. They listen carefully to the drum parts. The more music you listen to the better drummer you will be.

Find your favorite songs. Listen to the music and play the drum parts with your feet, and use your hands to slap your legs. This will help you learn and develop drum parts for the music that you like. Then on weekends you can transfer this knowledge to the drum set.



.
 

spleeeeen

Platinum Member
Playing the drums is a lot more than stick technique, rudiments, speed and chops. The most important component of playing the drums is mental. Learning song structure is very important. Learning how to provide a drum part to the structure of music is a mental operation.

I assume they will allow you to listen to music after class; like in the evenings. The best drummers listen to, and analyze, a lot of music every day. They listen carefully to the drum parts. The more music you listen to the better drummer you will be.

Find your favorite songs. Listen to the music and play the drum parts with your feet, and use your hands to slap your legs. This will help you learn and develop drum parts for the music that you like. Then on weekends you can transfer this knowledge to the drum set.
.
Some great ideas here from Hollywood. You can also work on developing your inner clock while you're away from the instrument. Get Mac Santiago's book, Beyond the Metronome: Becoming and Inchronous Musician, download the audio files and practice the exercises while clapping, slapping your knees/tapping your feet, or even just singing or "playing" patterns in your head. I actually listen to these tracks and practice developing time-keeping in my head while commuting to and from work.

And if you can get access to one, practicing/playing piano is always good.
 

gfour

Junior Member
You can search YouTube for "body percussion" videos and routines. Not exactly drums but you can practice body percussion without any instruments and train coordination/independence (and it can be fun).

If a smartphone (without internet access) is permitted, you can keep downloaded instruction videos there or a metronome app.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I would work on my reading skills. Get a few books, and practice sight reading lines from them with your hands and feet. Obviously, you're a bit limited, but you can never have too much practice reading rhythms.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Alternate suggestion,

Take the time off from drums to learn other facets of the industry.

Reading music (as Watso suggested)
Studio recording concepts and workflow
Dance and choreography
Makeup/Wardrobe
Business Management
Writing/Composition/Orchestration
Learn to sing (Backing vocals get jobs)
 

FFFF

Senior Member
Very good suggestions from the last two posts. You can definitely work on your other senses of musicality, or anything related to or may inspire you.

On top of what others said, I was going to suggest bringing in George Stone's Stick Control and practice that with your hands with a metronome app on your phone (if they don't allow you to bring in a metronome). That will keep you busy with stick coordination at least. Then when you go home in the weekend, pick up your sticks and work on everything else you've fall behind on? Of course, this is only one of the many other things you could do.

But honestly, if I were you, I would sneak in a really cheap pair of sticks and play it on the bed. Just hope that the roommates are your good mates and won't snitch on you.

this is Rufus Speedy Jones' son, who is doing prison time, no internet, no sticks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoFS-Ts364w
Definitely a true inspiration! Anything can be makeshift to practice when you have the will to play drums. That's definitely the advantage of us being drummers too!
 

XG65

Senior Member
Thanks for the replies, guys. Your advices are very helpful.

Smuggle sticks in. Tape them to your shin. It's school not prison.

No foreign objects? Really? Make sticks from branches. They would be domestic.

What year is this?
Southeast-Asian schools are usually a bit more... uptight(?) than American schools when it comes to stuff like this. Like it or not, I have go with the flow.

Very good suggestions from the last two posts. You can definitely work on your other senses of musicality, or anything related to or may inspire you.

On top of what others said, I was going to suggest bringing in George Stone's Stick Control and practice that with your hands with a metronome app on your phone (if they don't allow you to bring in a metronome). That will keep you busy with stick coordination at least. Then when you go home in the weekend, pick up your sticks and work on everything else you've fall behind on? Of course, this is only one of the many other things you could do.

But honestly, if I were you, I would sneak in a really cheap pair of sticks and play it on the bed. Just hope that the roommates are your good mates and won't snitch on you.!
How would you define musical drumming?
 

FFFF

Senior Member
XG65 said:
How would you define musical drumming?
By that I meant developing your skills as a musician. Rather than the technical side of things, you could be focusing on activities that would improve your sense of timing, pitch, musical forms, timbre, etc. For example, if you are to pick up singing, you would be working on pitch, timbre, and it gives you a different perspective of drums (as in now you rely on the drummer to give you time and lay out parts of the music).
 
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