Writing 3/4 Basics

carychilton

Junior Member
I am teaching this attached lesson to a few new guitar students.



It is 3/4 strum. The physical pattern in stroke-order is in a group of three.

The sound of the strum is slightly swung, slightly country-ish, camp-fire type strum. ;)

As written, it sounds as I taught it.



Unfortnately, I get frustrated writing stuff in 3/4 or 6/8 easily. hehe I understand the count, 1..2...3...

1 and 2 and... 1 and e 2 and e 3 and... writing out counts in a score, is often not CLEAN to the bar.

Epecially if using swing and lots rests for jazz or funk. Even with this simple camplre-fire strum 3 count pattern,...



Because of the quarter, and 2 eighths equalling 4 eighths to the bar, each bar flip-flops in how it appears, though in reality the 3 count (pattern) is simply repeated.

Is there another way to write this to keep have each bar indentical while keeping the timing/tempo eactly the same?





Thanks
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I don't think I get what you're asking, either... It looks just fine to me. If your main pulse is in 3, how else are you going to write it? How is writing in 3 different than 4? It's still the same note value, just less of them per.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Looks like what you have written out is 4/3 not 3/4. You have 4 notes in 3 bars, and it should be 3 notes in 4 bars. It should look like this:

|| 1 2 3 | 2 2 3 | 3 2 3 | 4 2 3 ||

You have this:

|| 1 2 3 2 | 2 3 3 2 | 3 4 2 3 ||

Add a fourth bar, and just have 3 notes in each, your pattern will repeat as you need it
 

con struct

Platinum Member
Looks like what you have written out is 4/3 not 3/4. You have 4 notes in 3 bars, and it should be 3 notes in 4 bars. It should look like this:

|| 1 2 3 | 2 2 3 | 3 2 3 | 4 2 3 ||

You have this:

|| 1 2 3 2 | 2 3 3 2 | 3 4 2 3 ||

Add a fourth bar, and just have 3 notes in each, your pattern will repeat as you need it
What the......!?@&#!? Nope. It's all in 3/4, alright.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Looks like what you have written out is 4/3 not 3/4. You have 4 notes in 3 bars, and it should be 3 notes in 4 bars. It should look like this:

|| 1 2 3 | 2 2 3 | 3 2 3 | 4 2 3 ||

You have this:

|| 1 2 3 2 | 2 3 3 2 | 3 4 2 3 ||

Add a fourth bar, and just have 3 notes in each, your pattern will repeat as you need it
The notation is correct - it's 3/4.

2 8th notes = 1 quarter note.
1 bar of 3/4 would be 3 quarter notes or the equivalent in smaller subdivisions, e.g. 1 quarter note & 4 8th notes (like in the 2nd bar), or 2 quarter notes & 2 8th notes (like in the 1st bar). Everything's correct! No 4/3 measure here.
 
Last edited:

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Duh, sorry! Somehow I failed to notice there are 1/8 notes. I do know how to read music, guess maybe I just don't know how to pay attention!
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
If you write it as 2:4 then each bar has the same pattern.

Not sure what this will do to the sound of the groove though.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Then hopefully you must also know that there's no such thing as a third note. :)

What's a 1/8 note?
Third, as in the first, the second, and the third, the order in which the notes are played. I know there is not a 1/3rd note.

1/8th note, as in .125% of a whole note.

I made a mistake, looked at what I had done, and fessed up to it. No need to be a jerk about it.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
If I'm getting what you're saying, then the problem is this song is not in 3/4.

It should be in 4/4, and bar lines need to be adjusted.

What I am seeing is,and what you said:
Because of the quarter, and 2 eighths equalling 4 eighths to the bar, each bar flip-flops in how it appears
,

You have a pattern of a quarter, two eights, quarter, two eights, repeated.

And you want the two eights swung.

Which gives us what every drummer knows as the basic 4/4 jazz ride pattern.

1 2 +3 4 +1 2 +3 4 +
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I should add that there is no such time signature as 4/3.

Is there another way to write this to keep have each bar indentical while keeping the timing/tempo eactly the same?
You could change the meter to 6/4, so each two measures of 3/4 = one measure of 6/4. Otherwise, no. Your strumming pattern is two beats (or four 8th notes) long, and there are three beats (or six 8th notes) per measure in 3/4, so they aren't going to line up exactly without changing one of them. I think you should change your pattern so the 8th notes repeat, giving you a rhythm of 1, 2& 3& every measure.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
If I understood the OP correctly, what he's saying has nothing to do with the time signature, it has to do with written notation itself, he wants to know if there's a way to notate that pattern so that ALL bars look the same instead of alternating like they are now, like if you notated a basic rock beat it would look the same in every bar.
 

con struct

Platinum Member
Third, as in the first, the second, and the third, the order in which the notes are played. I know there is not a 1/3rd note.

1/8th note, as in .125% of a whole note.

I made a mistake, looked at what I had done, and fessed up to it. No need to be a jerk about it.
No no no. I put a smiley thing after what I said. I mean, you have to admit that it's funny. :)
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
There is no swing feel to this song, just straight eight note feel.
Except the music clearly states that the eighth note should be played swung.

I bet you frequently ignore tempo and dynamic markings as well as anyone conducting you as well.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
No no no. I put a smiley thing after what I said. I mean, you have to admit that it's funny. :)
Sorry, I've been in a kind of crappy mood today, probably just took it wrong.

So I don't really understand guitar tab that well. I know the numbers represent the frets. Whats with the arrows? Is that the direction your hand moves? If so, does it really matter which way you strum the strings since all the notes are being played at once in a chord? I don't play guitar at all, even though I have owned 5 of them. (not trying to hijack the thread, but I am curious and where else will I learn?)
 

con struct

Platinum Member
Sorry, I've been in a kind of crappy mood today, probably just took it wrong.

So I don't really understand guitar tab that well. I know the numbers represent the frets. Whats with the arrows? Is that the direction your hand moves? If so, does it really matter which way you strum the strings since all the notes are being played at once in a chord? I don't play guitar at all, even though I have owned 5 of them. (not trying to hijack the thread, but I am curious and where else will I learn?)
Oh, pay no attention to the bottom clef, that's for guitarists. Our concern is the upper clef, the one with the actual notes in it, the one for real musicians.
 

carychilton

Junior Member
The notation is correct - it's 3/4.

2 8th notes = 1 quarter note.
1 bar of 3/4 would be 3 quarter notes or the equivalent in smaller subdivisions, e.g. 1 quarter note & 4 8th notes (like in the 2nd bar), or 2 quarter notes & 2 8th notes (like in the 1st bar). Everything's correct! No 4/3 measure here.
Ok thanks. I just wanted to make sure that I wrote it correct. I don't really score music.... but I am starting. This strum pattern has 3 beats before it's repeat so it is 3/4 or 6/8 as I understand. I just wondered if there was a another way to represent the score to reflect the strum pattern more clearly. I guess not. haha
 

StickIt

Senior Member
I don't understand why the score has to be in 3/4. It is just strumming practice, right?

If I am correct, each chord plays for 12 beats...so you could divide that into 3 measures of 4/4 which will show a repetitive rhythm in each bar,

or into 4 measures of 3/4, as you have done.

The last chord (F) only gets 9 beats...so you'd have to expand the score a little (to give it an equal number of beats) if you wanted to write the whole thing out in 4/4, and have it come out correctly.
 
Top