Wrist pain/hitting too hard

Aeolian

Platinum Member
+100 to all the comments about volume levels at rehearsal. Unless you are doing a varsity tour performance rehearsal where all the sound systems and lighting rigs are being rung out, there's no need for "performance" volume levels. Rehearsals for pros are to get the arrangements down, maybe come up with a few things by playing off each other, and dial in who's feel on the song everyone else is going to follow. Typically with minimal instrumentation. Guitarists should have worked out their pedal board of doom at home. As should everyone else with their parts or effects. Maybe you run though a performance rehearsal once or twice to let them iron out some bugs, but regularly rehearsing at blazing volumes with all the toys is kind of an amateur thing. Folks that just want to turn it up to 11 and "jam", instead of prepare for gigs. If that's what you and your band are into, then you may want to invest in a small mixer and headphones so you can mic up your kit (hey, you get your toys too) and hear it (along with everyone else) at reasonable volumes.

You only get one pair of ears to a customer. There's no reason to abuse yours just to "practice" or "get tight". If I had a dime for every time I heard folks say they needed to schedule more "rehearsals" so they could "get tight"... Tight is an ability, borne of personal practice, of everyone to listen to each other and play together. It doesn't come from endless pounding away in a carpeted room.
 

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
Are you still experiencing the wrist pain? Find anything that alleviates it?
I switched to French grip on the ride, which saw the wrist pain go. I then got a twisting injury on my right arm (badly placed cymbal at a gig) soon after and switched to French on both hands for a while because of that pain. That's going now and I'm moving to a mix of French and German now.

I've learned a lot of lessons the hard way lately: about volume, grip, how my kit projects in ways I don't hear and being careful to put a cymbal in the right place.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
...and being careful to put a cymbal in the right place.
Absolutely, it's crucial, even essential to have the elements of your kit as ergonomically viable as possible, very often, the source of tension, discomfort and eventually pain comes from poor ergonomics and bad grip/postures, it's worth to really listen to what your body's telling you.
 

MJD

Silver Member
Absolutely, it's crucial, even essential to have the elements of your kit as ergonomically viable as possible, very often, the source of tension, discomfort and eventually pain comes from poor ergonomics and bad grip/postures, it's worth to really listen to what your body's telling you.
Couldn't agree more. i played someone else's kit a while back nd halfway through a song i was aching cause the ride was just way too close and angled in an uncomfortable place FOR ME. For the guy who owns the kit it's perfect, he's shorter than i am and has a different build. As to band volume if you can hear yourself you are too loud. On stage that is. I used to play guitar in bands and could never hear myself but would listen to the recordings and realize that the balance was perfect out front. Same thing applies to drums. If i can actually hear my snare then that means i'm drowning everyone else out and i need to lower the volume. The recordings from the front of the house bear me out. when i cant hear anything i'm doing the balance is perfect out front. when i can hear what i'm playing then i'm most certainly too loud. the only exception is spots where i have a true solo(no one else playing).
 

Ariffy

Member
I can't see the video unfortunately.

If I could add something it would be not to hold the sticks too tightly
 
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