Will anyone ever write another 'classic'

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
What will wedding bands be playing in 10 years time?

Has there been a 'classic' written in the last 20 years?

Will wedding bands therefore still be essentially playing the same sets as they do now?

Will anyone ever write another song that will genuinly end up being a 'classic'?
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
yes, I think so...............................
:p

There does seem to me though to be a love of all things 60s, 70s, even the 80s as far as music goes but then it tails off drastically. Look at your typical wedding band set list (a decent barometer of a songs longevity I reckon) and those 3 decades are well represented, there is usually a smattering of current chart hits, maybe one or two. But those will be replaced each year. I'm not sure anyone will write a song that is considered as much of a classic as the likes of Zeppelin, the Who, Queen, etc etc.
 

larryz

Platinum Member
Not at the rate the 1960s-70s were churning out hits. I've heard the argument that radio today just doesn't play the good stuff but it's still out there. I don't think so. I listen to independent stations and the new stuff today just isn't that good.

I laugh at the story of The Turtles. Something like they were intentionally trying to write a silly stupid song to either piss off their label or because they were tired of the business by the late 60s - a song they knew would suck and it was "Elenore" which of course became a hit and is one of my fav tunes. So they couldn't write a bad song even when they tried to.

Couple that with Lennon & McCartney tossing off not Beatles-worthy discarded tunes to other artists who were having hits with them - Stones, Peter & Gordon, etc.
 

audioragegarden

Senior Member
The classics simply change from generation to generation. My classics range from "Baba O'Riley", "Purple Haze", and "Layla", to "Smells Like Teen Spirit" "Black Hole Sun" and "Rooster". I think for the next generation songs like "Seven Nation Army" and "Everlong" may likely be considered classics. It's all based on passage of time and perspective.
 

MJD

Silver Member
The classics simply change from generation to generation. My classics range from "Baba O'Riley", "Purple Haze", and "Layla", to "Smells Like Teen Spirit" "Black Hole Sun" and "Rooster". I think for the next generation songs like "Seven Nation Army" and "Everlong" may likely be considered classics. It's all based on passage of time and perspective.
This! However i think you also missed a key component that all those songs have in common and that is extremely fine compositional craftsmanship. Musical composition is a craft like any other. I've been switching over to Top 40 stations lately because there have recently been a glut of very well written pieces of music. Unfortunately it seems the composers are miles ahead of the lyricists these days but on purely musical merits things seem to be looking up.
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
The classics simply change from generation to generation. My classics range from "Baba O'Riley", "Purple Haze", and "Layla", to "Smells Like Teen Spirit" "Black Hole Sun" and "Rooster". I think for the next generation songs like "Seven Nation Army" and "Everlong" may likely be considered classics. It's all based on passage of time and perspective.
Ah but you see this is what I'm getting at. I don't think this is true. I think in 2014 we are still heralding the classics of the 60s, 70s. Whilst you and I may have favourite songs from the 90s, 2000s etc, they are likely not considered classics in the sense that they will find their way into a wedding band set list. Unless of course you hire a rock/metal specific covers band to play smells like teen spirit and black hole sun, which to me does not constitute being labelled a timeless classic. I'm a metal fan primarily so I know what you mean, in specific genres there have been some great songs. Do they appeal to everyone. no.

This! However i think you also missed a key component that all those songs have in common and that is extremely fine compositional craftsmanship. Musical composition is a craft like any other. I've been switching over to Top 40 stations lately because there have recently been a glut of very well written pieces of music. Unfortunately it seems the composers are miles ahead of the lyricists these days but on purely musical merits things seem to be looking up.
Some top 40 song writing is indeed exceptional these days. But I think the look and lyrics of artists is generally pitched at a very small and predominantly young demographic so the songs age fast and lose their relevance. Such specific song writing wasn't going on 30/40 years ago.
 

Diet Kirk

Silver Member
Not at the rate the 1960s-70s were churning out hits. I've heard the argument that radio today just doesn't play the good stuff but it's still out there. I don't think so. I listen to independent stations and the new stuff today just isn't that good.

I laugh at the story of The Turtles. Something like they were intentionally trying to write a silly stupid song to either piss off their label or because they were tired of the business by the late 60s - a song they knew would suck and it was "Elenore" which of course became a hit and is one of my fav tunes. So they couldn't write a bad song even when they tried to.

Couple that with Lennon & McCartney tossing off not Beatles-worthy discarded tunes to other artists who were having hits with them - Stones, Peter & Gordon, etc.
I think this is linked to the fact that it was a golden era for music, there was money in the labels, studios were flourishing etc. We don't seem to look back at any of the last 3 or 4 decades of music in the same way.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I think this is linked to the fact that it was a golden era for music, there was money in the labels, studios were flourishing etc. We don't seem to look back at any of the last 3 or 4 decades of music in the same way.
The last '3 or 4 decades' would bring us back to 1970-1980. High times for music production of all kinds. Actually the gloat in money/labels/studios peaked right up to the late 90s - then Napster, file sharing, digital and the new world.

Its just generational. Most of the comments here are coloured by the fact the average age here on DW is likely 40+. New 'hits' for weddings are being made by Adele or Katy Perry or ...for a new generation weddings will not take place for another 10 - 20 years.

But whichever way you slice it, people will always get up to sing for New York, New York, or Don't Stop Believing.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
I do not think there will be any more "classic" songs. Radio is way too fragmented for any song to be known by most people. Peace and goodwill.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Gee I hope so. Classic means different things to different people so I am sure there will not be any shortage of music that inspires.

What if no more music was allowed to happen and all we had is what was already recorded? I would still be more than satisfied for the rest of my life discovering things I never heard before, there's just not enough time in the day to get through it all.
 
M

Mike_In_KC

Guest
Here are four songs I expect to hear at my daughter's wedding in 2024 - assuming I have no say in the list...

"Just the Way You Are" by Bruno Mars
"Raise Your Glass" by Pink
"I Gotta Feeling" by The Black Eyed Peas
"Party Rock Anthem" by LMFAO

MM
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Not at the rate the 1960s-70s were churning out hits. I've heard the argument that radio today just doesn't play the good stuff but it's still out there.
Agreed on both points. A larger percentage of today's hits are fairly forgettable compared to the hits from the '50s, '60s and '70s when rock and pop was fresh, and generations were more optimistic and I think generally happier. That is, the impact and memories of those songs stay for a lifetime.

There are new classics, and you can usually tell the instant you hear them. R. Kelly "I Believe I Can Fly" and Green Day's "Good Riddance" (aka Time Of Your Life) immediately come to mind. I'm sure with a little thought, I could name a dozen more. But the number would pale in comparison to the perennial favorites from 3+ decades ago.

Still, the 'kids' will come out to the bars and dance to the old hits from before they were born - Creedence, Stones, Motown, etc. Classics gonna be classics.

Bermuda
 
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sbowman128675

Senior Member
I think with the dawn of the electrical age, music has been at a stand-still. The industry saw a way to make music fast and cheap, but, now that it seems that it's all repetitive, people are changing...music is changing. When drummers saw the dawn of electric drums, they integrated them into their drum sets. Now, that electronics are sounding more and more like actual instruments and are getting more and more interesting, bands are using them more and more.I just said "more and more" way to much....

I see a lot of new bands having real and electronic instruments mixed, I see people coming up with new sounds and styles all the time.

I think music is ready to evolve again. Look at Lordi and her music...it is very folk sounding. Or the new Panic At The Disco music. Or even the new Wolfmother album. All examples of music evolving again.

Music just needed to catch up to the times and it has.

I think the next 20 years are going to produce some very classic sounds that will be integral to music for the generations to come.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
The last '3 or 4 decades' would bring us back to 1970-1980. High times for music production of all kinds. Actually the gloat in money/labels/studios peaked right up to the late 90s - then Napster, file sharing, digital and the new world.

Its just generational. Most of the comments here are coloured by the fact the average age here on DW is likely 40+. New 'hits' for weddings are being made by Adele or Katy Perry or ...for a new generation weddings will not take place for another 10 - 20 years.

But whichever way you slice it, people will always get up to sing for New York, New York, or Don't Stop Believing.
^ This.

If you were 40 in 1964, you probably couldn't stand the Beatles, hated all the songs we now call classic.

If/when my now 7yr old son gets married some day, I fully expect to hear some Katy Perry.
 

porter

Platinum Member
...there have recently been a glut of very well written pieces of music. Unfortunately it seems the composers are miles ahead of the lyricists these days but on purely musical merits things seem to be looking up.
Its just generational. Most of the comments here are coloured by the fact the average age here on DW is likely 40+. New 'hits' for weddings are being made by Adele or Katy Perry or ...for a new generation weddings will not take place for another 10 - 20 years.
Absolutely. Most songs played at weddings, we have to assume, will generally be from 25+ years before the wedding, especially since they are often songs that the involved parties "grew up to" or what have you.

If/when my now 7yr old son gets married some day, I fully expect to hear some Katy Perry.
We can only hope for as beautiful a world as this.
 
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