Wide or standard

oldmetalhead

Junior Member
I have often wondered about going with wide snares instead of the standard width. Any suggestions on this? What would one gain from wide snares vs standard? And what are the various sizes?
 

Ghostin one

Senior Member
I avoid wide snares unless the snare bed was cut wide enough. I'd like to use wide snares sometimes but avoiding unwanted snare buzz wins out.

Anyway it's worth a try, it might work out for you.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
My understanding is wider snares equals more sensitivity with snares, this might be more of a nuance geared for jazz or orchestra.

I know the Gretsch 4160s from 60s and 70s (not sure if they still are) were equipped with the 42 strands as stock option, so they were snares that would accompany this width.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I tried wide snare wires one time, and didn't really care for them. I don't know if I went too cheap - they were just run of the mill 40 or 42 strand wires - or if it wasn't the right drum for it or what the deal was, but I have 20 strand Puresound Blasters on every snare I have, and those seem to be where it's at for me.
 

oldmetalhead

Junior Member
Thank you both for your info. If you are more inclined to want a very snappy sound like Dave Lombardo what would you suggest?
 

donzo74

Junior Member
Generally, from what I have seen, the wide snares are used by guys playing in very loud situations where they want the snare to cut through the mix more. The examples I'm thinking of are John Bonham (used wide snares on his LM402) and John Tempesta (has wide snares on his Tama Signature 14x7 brass drum). I don't know how Lombardo sets his up but I can see wide snares on one of his drums in one of his Drummerworld pics.

Sometimes a snare can start to sound like a tom if you are hitting it real hard. With the wide snares, you get a lot more snare sound but it changes the character of the drum sound, as well. Due to the extra contact area with the bottom head and the fact that you usually have to crank up the tension on the snares to reduce extra sympathetic buzz, they can dry up the tone of the drum and give you less bottom end. You end up with a higher pitched, dry drum sound with a lot more snare buzz sound and cut. I tried wides on my 402 Supra but I found that I enjoyed the traditional stock sound more on that drum so I went back to 20's. I have a Tama Starclassic heavy brass 14x7 and I recently put a set of 42 strand snares on it in order to set it up like the Tempesta signature drum and I do enjoy the sound of the wides on that drum. I haven't taken it on a gig yet but it sounds nice in my living room. As has been said before, your drum must have a wide snare bed to fit the wide snares or you won't be able to get the residual snare buzz under control.
 

Yunieta

Member
Generally, from what I have seen, the wide snares are used by guys playing in very loud situations where they want the snare to cut through the mix more. The examples I'm thinking of are John Bonham (used wide snares on his LM402) and John Tempesta (has wide snares on his Tama Signature 14x7 brass drum). I don't know how Lombardo sets his up but I can see wide snares on one of his drums in one of his Drummerworld pics.

Sometimes a snare can start to sound like a tom if you are hitting it real hard. With the wide snares, you get a lot more snare sound but it changes the character of the drum sound, as well. Due to the extra contact area with the bottom head and the fact that you usually have to crank up the tension on the snares to reduce extra sympathetic buzz, they can dry up the tone of the drum and give you less bottom end. You end up with a higher pitched, dry drum sound with a lot more snare buzz sound and cut. I tried wides on my 402 Supra but I found that I enjoyed the traditional stock sound more on that drum so I went back to 20's. I have a Tama Starclassic heavy brass 14x7 and I recently put a set of 42 strand snares on it in order to set it up like the Tempesta signature drum and I do enjoy the sound of the wides on that drum. I haven't taken it on a gig yet but it sounds nice in my living room. As has been said before, your drum must have a wide snare bed to fit the wide snares or you won't be able to get the residual snare buzz under control.
+1
 

donzo74

Junior Member
I haven't played with Canopus snares but I've heard others speak very highly of them. I like the cheap $10 Gibraltar 20 strand snares. They are modeled after the stock Ludwig snares and I like them for general purpose usage. They are sensitive and the end pieces are small and light so they don't distort or choke the natural sound of the drum.
 
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