Why don't many Pro Drummers use Electric Drums?

donzo74

Junior Member
I play e-kits at some rehearsal spaces. They are good for low-volume rehearsing and I especially like them because they keep me from having to bring anything to rehearsal but sticks and a few beers. I have played e-kits at several churches and once again, I was happy to not have to bring my gear, but I still prefer acoustic sets for live performances. There were times that I hit multiple instruments at once, like a bass drum and cymbal, and one or the other sound wouldn't show up in the system. Not good when you stick a big BD hit on 1 and it's not there. Also, you are at the total mercy of the sound booth and I've had people come up to me after services and tell me that they heard more of the sound of the stick hitting the pads than they did of the electronically generated sounds. Limited dynamic range may be attainable on e-drums, but nowhere near the sensitivity and range that acoustic drums provide. I won't even mention cymbal sound quality because it is not even worth my time to type it. Y'all know what's up.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Id say half for the aesthetics of it. They don't look the same. Something about even a top tier roland looks less "cool" than a real kit.
The other half sound. They dynamics are not even close. Even on an 8k ekit.. Sure VST's sound pretty good, but you don't have the touch, feel, dynamics of a real kit.

They work great. and are a fun practice tool, recording tool, toy. Live I wouldn't use one.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Why don't many Pro Drummers use Electric Drums?
Why would they? Who gets into playing drums and says "Real drums? Bah! Give me the electronic stuff!" Maybe one percent of drummers? I do not mean to disparage e-drummers, I was one for over a decade, but the thought of choosing to play edrums over actual drums (and maybe even more importantly - cymbals) to me is absurd.
 
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Nick74

Junior Member
Isn't it also a matter of style!? Visit AbletonDrummer and you'll learn about eDrums. Check out eDrum remixes like this one and learn about triggering audio and video and lighting! Not everybody likes only BluesRock, Jazz or Metal... There are Pros who are into EDM!
 
eDrums aren't for everyone.

If your like me(and most drummers) and can't just play your accoustics whenever you feel like it, eDrums are the best solution to an enjoyable practice. Top level eDrums are expensive, but the same holds true for accoustics. I don't see any pros playing Zildjian Z's, or a $100 snare on stage.

the mimic pro is definitely on the right path. I use pretty much the setup in this video for practice/rehearsal and Im getting pretty close to having them dialed in to using them live.(mine e's tho are DIY not store bought) I don't know if I would use live, I love acoustics as well and I agree you can't do certain things on E's that you can on A's. But you also can't do certain things on A's that you can with E's.


these sound pretty close to acoustics to me. lol.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
As someone who has owned top tier ekits and many akits I'll add this.

The new ekits (mimic) and VST's "SOUND" like real drums. without the feel, dynamics, touch, etc. Midi is only 127 layers. and when you hit a snare 1 inch from the same spot it sounds different, every single time. the ekit doesn't do that.

Ekits make you sound much better and more consistent than you are. That being said, I still enjoy playing them.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I think it's playing two different instruments like difference between piano and an electric organ. An e-kit could just be the pads on a table-you set it up to emulate a drum kit. You could easily just walk in with a board with all the pads-and maybe some feet triggers or the band use a drum machine (lord forbid). I guess I'm a bit of an anal-og guy.
 

Intruder

Senior Member
The thing is this though. The non-drummer listening don't give two shirts as long as it sounds good and / or can be danced to in the mix.
E-drums are are here to stay, deal with it. They will probably never be mainstream on stage. People just don't like change.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
It isn't a change it's more the difference between playing a piano and an electric organ-you go through same motions. But organs have changed from vacuum tubes in a Hammond to modern digital. So it's a digital world now and I can see an Electronica Jam band going all Digital and use an e-kit in time-things are always evolving.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Whatever floats one's boat. It's a tool to use, or not. They aren't actual drums though, so they can only be compared to other E kits. That's where the friction happens I think. It's not fair to compare and E kit to an A kit. They both make drum tones, but a plum and a pear are both fruits too. I don't compare pears to plums, only to other pears. Same deal here.

I will admit it is fun to bash them though lol because they fall so short. And no, that's not a comparison :)
 
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bud7h4

Silver Member
The thing is this though. The non-drummer listening don't give two shirts as long as it sounds good and / or can be danced to in the mix.
E-drums are are here to stay, deal with it. They will probably never be mainstream on stage. People just don't like change.
LOL is that what it is? They just don't like change? Just relics of a dying era, clinging to their ancient, obsolete ways?
Come on. I don't mind change. That's why I buy new real drums and real cymbals.
What I'm not going to do is try and replace them with something that is designed to mimic the real thing. Why would I do that? The whole reason I started drumming was to play a drum set, not merely produce the sounds by any means.

Edrums are good for many things, including some live performances. Buy they certainly aren't the future of drums lol. What they are is a supplement. They're a stand in, for when the real thing is not practical, whether it's for certain types of music, low volume, practice, etc.
 
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justadrummer

Junior Member
Omar Hakim did a clinic at "Drum Daze" in Columbus a few years back. (It might have been more than a few.) He split his clinic up between an acoustic Pearl kit and an electronic Roland kit. He said something that stuck with me. He approached acoustic and electronic drums as two similar, but different instruments, like a keyboard player approaches an acoustic piano and a Fender Rhodes.
 
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