Why do certain bands/jam sessions fizzle out?

markusjj

Member
I've been in a few cases where I'll jam with someone for a couple weeks or months then it just fizzles out. What's the deal?

For example, I'll jam with someone in hopes of starting a band and we just lose touch. It really makes me insecure about my abilities. Like I'm not good enough for them or something.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
It depends - it could be them. You know how musicians are!

Of course, if you've been in 20 'bands' and they all just disappear, it might indeed be you. Email a few of the ex-jammers and ask for honest feedback on your playing.

If you haven't been playing long, or don't have a good feel for the types of players you jam with, or have been picking players that expect more than you can deliver, or have simply been picking flakes to jam with, those are some real possibilities for the lack of follow-through.

If it's you, just keep practicing and seek players closer to your level of experience.

Bermuda
 

markusjj

Member
It depends - it could be them. You know how musicians are!

Of course, if you've been in 20 'bands' and they all just disappear, it might indeed be you. Email a few of the ex-jammers and ask for honest feedback on your playing.

If you haven't been playing long, or don't have a good feel for the types of players you jam with, or have been picking players that expect more than you can deliver, or have simply been picking flakes to jam with, those are some real possibilities for the lack of follow-through.

If it's you, just keep practicing and seek players closer to your level of experience.

Bermuda
Thanks Jon!

I haven't been in too many bands. One fizzling out was actually more my fault. The other band broke up because the lead vocalist got back together with his old band. He did call me a month ago to see if I wanted to start a new project so I must have done something right!

What just has been bothering me is that I have reconnected with two old friends. I jammed with one of them a month or two ago and I felt we REALLY clicked. Played a couple covers almost perfectly with no practice. We both decided we should find a bassist but we have yet to jam again even after trying to contact him. He recently apologized saying he has been really busy.

I have got the "been busy" runaround from my other friend also but we are supposed to get together tomorrow. I just have the feeling he is going to back out.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
When you say that you lose touch, exactly what do you mean? Do they return your calls and emails? Are they playing with others? Did they give you any feedback after you jammed? Were they above you or below you as far as skill? Did they like the same music that you like? Did you discuss forming a band with them? Many factors!

Have you gone to open mic nights each week and hooked up with people who are regs?
 

matt949

Senior Member
from my experience its usually cause the chemistry isnt quite there and just doesnt click like it should.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Persistence. Many cats I know suffer from the same experience. But this is also the worst time to try to get people together, around the holidays. One band I was in, other than paying gigs, we just completely shut down for the holidays.​
For others, some people just find it hard to say "sorry, not my thing". "I'll give you a call". "Good jam, we'll do this again". And then you never see or hear from them. Don't let it worry you, especially if you're young.​
 

TNA

Senior Member
I have had many bands fizzle out and I think there is one thing that needs to happen for bands to stick together. Someone has to be the leader. Not like the frontman, but the guy that is like acting band manager. He's the guy that calls everyone to try and get practices together, makes sure everyone's schedules work, books studio times, calls on gigs etc. If nobody steps into this role then yes the band does sort of lose touch after a while, because you couldn't come on this day but you forgot to tell everyone, or nobody called the bass player. It's difficult to coordinate people's schedules. Someone needs to be like the mediator, all communication goes through this one guy; you have a question you call him. In the two bands that I was in that did last longer than a year, there was always one guy that called everyone for practices. I had almost no communication with the other band members outside of practices. So if nobody is assuming this role then maybe you need to do it, but you have to be really proactive about it. You can't be lazy because you are the glue that holds the band together.

In my band the bass player handles everything. Schedules practices, books practice studio time, gets gigs, works on myspace, does all promotion, the rest of us just sort of show up and play. If the bass player suddenly stopped doing all that he is doing, we would probably rarely have practice, never play gigs, and have no sort of promotion.

Also if these are people who you are only jamming with once and then never hear from them again, it may just be that they didn't like your style, or the type of music you were playing. Many people have a hard time just saying "hey it's not my thing, but good luck" instead they just choose to not answer your calls.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
Could be just a matter of communication. Ask for honest feedback on your playing. Or your bandmates are simply chaotic with their schedules and agendas.

Also, jam sessions are kind of missing a goal when done too often. I think after some of them you have to get more serious, meaning either drop it or try to get some kind of a gig together, and put together a little set. So you know why you're practicing and rehearsing.
 
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